Archive for the ‘Themed Collections’ Category

What are your colleagues reading in Environmental Science: Nano?

The articles below are some of the most read Environmental Science: Nano articles in 2016. You can view the full collection of our top 10 downloaded articles here.

 

Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles
Eric S. Melby, Arielle C. Mensch, Samuel E. Lohse, Dehong Hu, Galya Orr, Catherine J. Murphy, Robert J. Hamers and Joel A. Pedersen

 

Recent advances in halloysite nanotube derived composites for water treatment
Liang Yu, Huixian Wang, Yatao Zhang, Bin Zhang and Jindun Liu

 

Environmental processes and toxicity of metallic nanoparticles in aquatic systems as affected by natural organic matter
Zhenyu Wang, Lei Zhang, Jian Zhao and Baoshan Xing

 

Effects of crystallite size on the structure and magnetism of ferrihydrite
Xiaoming Wang, Mengqiang Zhu, Luuk K. Koopal, Wei Li, Wenqian Xu, Fan Liu, Jing Zhang, Qingsong Liu, Xionghan Feng and Donald L. Sparks

 

Graphene–carbon nanotube aerogel as an ultra-light, compressible and recyclable highly efficient absorbent for oil and dyes
Wenchao Wan, Ruiyang Zhang, Wei Li, Hao Liu, Yuanhua Lin, Lina Li and Ying Zhou

 

Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Environmental Science: Nano by joining our e-alerts.

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Modelling in Environmental Nanotechnology

We are delighted to announce the publication of a themed collection on Modelling in Environmental Nanotechnology, guest edited by Mohammed Baalousha (University of South Carolina, US), Panos Georgopoulos (Rutgers University, US), Jamie Lead (University of South Carolina, US) and Dave Spurgeon (Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, UK).

This collection of papers presents state-of-the-art models for the fate, behaviour, exposure, uptake and toxicity of nanomaterials in the environment and in organisms, as well as a wide range of model types for environmental and biological processes affecting nanomaterial behaviour.

Read the full collection today: http://rsc.li/modelling

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Insights from SNO 2014 Annual Conference

In November 2014, the Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization (SNO), a non-profit, international, professional society, held its 3rd annual conference in Boston with over 220 participants in attendance. Drs. Jackie Isaacs of Northeastern University and Philp Demokritou of Harvard University co-chaired the meeting. SNO is dedicated to advancing sustainable nanotechnology around the world through education, research, and responsible growth of nanotechnology.

This themed collection is the summary of representative research papers presented at the Boston conference. Seven eminent scientists and engineers in the field of sustainable nanotechnology gave plenary lectures attended by participants from almost every U.S. state as well as many other countries. About 45% of participants were students, indicative of the recentness of the field.

Selected papers from the conference highlight how sustainable nanotechnology is leading the way to address economic development, global food supplies, as well as energy and water challenges while leaving minimal footprints that can give rise to environmental degradation.

Some of the papers represent the core aspects of sustainable nanotechnology, including biomedical applications, water treatment, green synthesis, life cycle assessments (LCA) and NanoEHS issues. Demokritou et al. present an integrated methodology for the assessment of environmental health implications during thermal decomposition of nano-enabled products.

Demokritou et al., DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00210E

An article by Vicki Grassian et al. reports an important finding that simple nanoscale materials can be complex when considering NanoEHS implications. A number of the fundamental research areas to address NanoEHS needs are suggested.

Grassian et al.

Grassian et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00112A

In a review article by Gilbertson, Wender, Zimmerman, and co-workers, the authors summarize recent advances in human and aquatic ecotoxicity life cycle impact assessment for engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and call for greater coordination between LCA modelers and experimentalists, including those who study fate and transport, environmental transformations, occupational exposure, and toxicology, to inform responsible development of nanotechnology, enabling the technology to reach its full potential.

Gilbertson et al.

Gilbertson et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00097A

The development of nanomaterials and nano-enabled products in a “greener” manner will minimize any EHS implications while maximizing the societal benefits.  Companies working with engineered nanomaterials are expected to make tradeoffs on the costs associated with increased levels of occupational safety and potential environmental impacts. For example, Isaacs et al. present a paper on the economic analysis of carbon nanotube (CNT) lithium-ion battery manufacturing. These authors present a stochastic process-based cost model to investigate the cost drivers for the manufacture of multi-walled CNT nickel manganese cobalt batteries that are targeted for satellite and computer applications. Among other things their results underscore the need for safer manufacturing practices for CNT lithium-ion batteries for application in low and high production volume products such as satellites and portable computers, respectively.

Isaacs et al.

Isaacs et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00078E

Greener nanotechnology can be the “role model” for industrial development in the 21st century. Sadik et al. demonstrate that a one-pot synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles is possible using conductive, electroactive, and biodegradable polymers. In addition to modest cytotoxicity against non-cancerous, immortalized and cancerous cell lines, the synthesized nanoparticles exhibit excellent antibacterial activity against gram negative and gram positive bacteria.

Sadik et al.

Sadik et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00053J

Pourzahedi et al. apply green chemistry and sustainable manufacturing to nanomaterial synthesis, with the goal of reducing life cycle energy use and environmental impacts. The authors use LCA to analyze and compare the environmental impacts of AgNPs produced through seven different synthesis routes (cradle-to-gate). LCA reveals both direct and indirect or upstream impacts associated with AgNPs. Results show that across synthesis routes, impacts associated with the upstream production of bulk silver itself are dominant for nearly every category of environmental impact, contributing to over 90% of life cycle burdens in some cases. The bio-based chemical reduction route has important tradeoffs in ozone depletion potential and ecotoxicity.

Pourzahedi et al.

Pourzahedi et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00075K

The release of ENMs into the environment has led to concerns about the potential risks to food safety and human health. Ebbs et al. describe the extent of ENM uptake into plant foods. The authors focus on the accumulation of zinc, copper, or cerium in carrot exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles and metal ions. They demonstrate that ENMs are no more toxic than the ionic treatments and show a reduced accumulation in the edible tissues of carrot. The results demonstrate that the understanding of ionic metal transport in plants may not accurately predict ENM transport and that an additional comparative study is needed for this and other crop plants.

Ebbs et al.

Ebbs et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00161G

Rodrigues et al. provide an assessment of the toxicity of exfoliated-MoS2 and annealed exfoliated-MoS2 towards planktonic cells, biofilms, and mammalian cells in the presence of electron donor.

Rodrigues et al.

Rodrigues et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00031A

Lee et al. report the development of precisely engineered manganese oxide nanoscale particles for the sorption of uranium as uranyl in water. They synthesize nanoparticles via thermal decomposition of manganese oleate and then phase-transfer the particles into water using ligand exchange and bilayer stabilization methods. The resulting monodisperse suspensions demonstrate significantly enhanced uranyl adsorption as a function of size, surface coating chemistries, and solution pH.

Lee et al.

Lee et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00010F

The fate of dysprosium oxide nanoparticles (Dy2O3) and their effects on natural biological systems are a growing concern. Oyanedel-Craver et al. have assessed the toxicity of nDy2O3 on Escherichia coli for concentrations between 0.02 and 2 mg/L exposed to three concentrations of NaCl and three glucose concentrations. Toxicity measurement of Dysprosium ion Dy(+3) suggest that it is the main contributor to the overall toxicity.

Oyanedel-Craver et al.

Oyanedel-Craver et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00074B

Among other applications, engineered superparamagnetic nanoparticles have broad potential in biotechnologies, high contrast magnetic resonance imaging, and advanced environmental sensing and remediation technologies. Fortner et al. present the flexible surface design strategies for a variety of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for applications in aqueous systems.

Fortner et al.

Fortner et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00089K

Chen et al. describe the aggregation and interactions of chemical mechanical planarization nanoparticles with model biological membranes, focusing on the role of phosphate adsorption.

Loon Chen et al.

Chen et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00176E

The difficulty of meeting the world’s energy demand is compounded by the growing need to protect human health and the environment. Nanotechnology will play a major role in the development of clean, affordable, and renewable energy sources. Soroush et al. demonstrate that silver nanoparticle (AgNPs)-decorated graphene oxide (GO) functionalized membranes exhibit super-hydrophilic properties with contact angles below 25°. The membranes also exhibit significant E. coli inactivation without adversely affecting the membrane transport properties. Such membrane could be employed as composites of forward osmosis and seawater desalination because of its energy efficiency.

Soroush et al.

Soroush et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EN00086F

We hope you enjoy this issue which represents a snapshot of the wider conversation on the topic of sustainable nanotechnology. We also invite you to visit us at www.susnano.org as we develop a framework for using nanotechnology to address grand global challenges in the energy, water, and food sectors while maintaining a balance between the economic, environmental, and societal issues.

Enjoy this issue!

Wunmi Sadik, President & Co-founder
Barbara Karn, Executive Director & Co-founder
Jacqueline Isaacs and Philip Demokritou, SNO 2014 Co-Chairs

Read the full collection online today: http://rsc.li/sno

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Environmental Science: Nano Themed Issue on Nanotoxicology

Are you currently doing research in an area of Nanotoxicology?

We propose to publish a unique themed issue of Environmental Science: Nano dedicated to nanotoxicology, which will be published in 2015 with the aim to provide a state-of-the-art synopsis of mechanistic knowledge obtained thus far with regard to the interactions of engineered nanomaterials with organisms in the environment, i.e. aquatic or terrestrial.

The past few years have seen an increase in research aimed at studying the toxicity of nanomaterials to organisms living in the environment. Yet, to this date, many studies are descriptive in nature: they simply report the nominal mass concentrations of nanomaterials that produce a stress response or toxic effect to individual organisms.

Therefore in this issue, we would like to present research aimed at elucidating mechanisms of nanomaterial-organism interactions based on thorough nanomaterial characterization as it presents itself upon exposure to organisms.

Associate editor Kristin Schirmer at EAWAG and co-guest editor Melanie Auffan at CEREGE are encouraging submissions from all areas of nanotoxicology, including:

  • Mechanistic interactions at the environment-organism (cell) barrier.
  • Quantification of cell or organism uptake, distribution and visualization of nanomaterials.
  • Elucidation of adaptive and/or toxic response pathways.
  • Environment–organism –nanomaterial corona.
  • Systemic stress responses (immune function, behaviour and development, and others).
  • Interference with Ecosystem Network Interactions (bioaccumulation and biomagnification, impact on symbiosis, communication and many more).

Submit your paper now!

Submission Deadline: 30th April 2015

You may contribute a Review or a Research paper – the only requirement being that it should be of the highest quality/calibre. Submitted manuscripts need to adhere to Environmental Science: Nano author guidelines, all manuscripts will still be subject to standard peer review procedures and an invitation does not mean automatic acceptance.

For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Nano and our author guidelines, please visit our website or email us at esnano-rsc@rsc.org

We hope to receive a manuscript from you or your group soon!

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Nanoceria themed issue

We are delighted to introduce our latest themed issue focused on the exciting topic of nanoceria!

This issue contains perspectives from a workshop on nanoceria held last November in California, preceding the Second Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization Conference.

Recognising that there was little communication but controversy among researchers investigating nanocerias’s beneficial and adverse effects, Robert Yokel proposed a workshop to bring together researchers to discuss its yang and yin.

This event was organized and attended by expert researchers actively investigating the beneficial and untoward effects of nanocerias.

Nanoceria is expected to have future application in fuel cells and batteries, and has shown benefit in treating numerous medical conditions that have inflammatory and oxidative injury components.

Robert A. Yokel, Guest Editor
Read his editorial online

This focused issue contains interesting perspectives and original research reports of studies focusing on nanocerias. The aim of this collection has been trying to understand the bases of nanocerias’ divergent effects.

The first part of this issue addresses what we currently know, which are the identified data gaps, and recommends what needs to be determined about the chemical, biological, human health, and environmental aspects of nanoceria.

Previously unpublished results of research studies of nanocerias comprise the second part of this collection.

This collection is the most comprehensive and current source of information on the chemistry, biology, and beneficial and untoward effects of nanocerias.

Robert’s research papers on nanoceria biodistribution and retention in rats and on adverse health perspectives of nanoceria were included in this collection. We would like to thank him for guest editing this tremendously exciting issue.

Read some of the papers included in this remarkable collection for free*:

Tutorial Review:
Exploring the properties and applications of nanoceria: is there still plenty of room at the bottom?
Kenneth Reed, Alastair Cormack, Aniruddha Kulkarni, Mark Mayton, Dean Sayle, Fred Klaessig and Brad Stadler
DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00079J

Critical Review:
Behavior of nanoceria in biologically-relevant environments
Amit Kumar, Soumen Das, Prabhakaran Munusamy, William Self, Donald R. Baer, Dean C. Sayle and Sudipta Seal
DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00052H

Articles:
Effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on asparagus lettuce cultured in an agar medium
Di Cui, Peng Zhang, Yuhui Ma, Xiao He, Yuanyuan Li, Jing Zhang, Yuechun Zhao and Zhiyong Zhang
DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00025K

Metabolomic effects in HepG2 cells exposed to four TiO2 and two CeO2 nanomaterials
Kirk T. Kitchin, Eric Grulke, Brian L. Robinette and Benjamin T. Castellon
DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00096J

Read the full collection on our website

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Nano2014 Winners!

Following our recent entry regarding the 9th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials (Nano2014), we proudly present the award winners of this inspiring conference.

This year, the conference was held from September 7th –11th in Columbia, South Carolina, and the awards were jointly granted by Environmental Chemistry and Environmental Science: Nano.

With no further delay, let’s introduce the names of the winners!

Best Poster: Daniel Starnes (University of Kentucky)
Silver Nanoparticles, they get better with age

Runner up: Seyyedali Mirshahghassemi (University of South Carolina)
Separation of oil from wastewater using iron oxide nanoparticles

Best Oral Presentation: Maryam Khaksar (University of South Australia)
In situ study of the chemical transformation of surface functionalized silver nanoparticles along the water-sediment continuum

Runner up: Van Ortega (University of Alberta)
The effects of nanoparticle exposures on the phagocytic capacity of immune cells

Congratulations to all of the winners! The judges of the prize thought the quality of the presentations were really high and, from the Environmental Science: Nano team, we would like to thank all the students that attended or presented at the meeting.

To mark this special occasion, Environmental Science: Nano is proud to announce an exciting web collection that will gather together review articles, original research papers and communications covering topics discussed at the conference.


We welcome submissions from key research areas including but not limited to:

– Physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles as related to the environment and health
– Ageing and effects of fate and behaviour
– Toxicology and ecotoxicology
– Social and regulatory sciences
– Innovation and applications of nanotechnology to environmental and health issues

For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Nano, our article types and author guidelines, please visit our website or contact us at esnano-rsc@rsc.org.

Please note that all submitted manuscripts will be subject to peer review in accordance to the journals high quality standards.

Submission Deadline: 18th December 2014

We hope to receive a manuscript from you or your group soon.

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Modelling in Environmental Nanotechnology

Modelling in Environmental Nanotechnology – an Environmental Science:Nano themed issue!


We invite you to contribute your exciting research to our special issue on Modelling in Environmental Nanotechnology.

Guest Edited by Mohammed Baalousha, Jamie Lead, Panos G. Georgopoulos and Dave Spurgeon, this themed issue will include a set of papers presenting state-of-the-art models for the fate, behavior, exposure, uptake and toxicity of nanomaterials in the environment and in organisms. This will include a wide range of model types for environmental and biological processes affecting nanomaterial behavior and effects. Review papers on the state of the science for particular model subsets, e.g. computational toxicology or bio-uptake modelling are also desired.

For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Nano, our article types and author guidelines, please visit our website or email us esnano-rsc@rsc.org. Please note that all submitted manuscripts will be subject to peer review in accordance to the journals high quality standards.

Submission Deadline: 15th March 2015

We hope to receive a manuscript from you or your group soon.
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A call for papers from the 2014 ICEENN Conference

Did you attend the 2014 ICEENN Conference?

The 9th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials (Nano2014) was held September 7th – 11th 2014, bringing together researchers, regulators, and industry to discuss the potential hazards and risks of current and future applications in the key sector of nanotechnology, along with mechanisms to bring about risk reduction while maintaining economic and social benefits.

The 9th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials

As one of the official Publishers for the conference, Environmental Science: Nano is delighted to announce an exciting web collection that will gather together review articles, original research papers and communications covering topics discussed at the conference. We welcome submissions from key research areas such as:
  • Physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles as related to the environment and health
  • Ageing and effects of fate and behaviour
  • Toxicology and ecotoxicology
  • Social and regulatory sciences
  • Innovation and applications of nanotechnology to environmental and health issues

For more information on the scope of Environmental Science: Nano, our article types and author guidelines, please visit our website or email us esnano-rsc@rsc.org. Please note that all submitted manuscripts will be subject to peer review in accordance to the journals high quality standards.

Submission Deadline: 18th December 2014

We hope to receive a manuscript from you or your group soon.
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