Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

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The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) today each became signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, reasserting the commitment of both organizations to enhancing the scholarly publishing experience for researchers worldwide who are involved in chemistry and allied fields.

The commitment by these two global chemistry publishers to undertake new workflow integration with technology infrastructure provided by ORCID, a not-for-profit organization that provides unique identifiers for researchers and scholars, will enable both societies to provide unambiguous designation of author names within chemistry and across the broader sciences. This partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations that is too often a source of confusion for those who must rely on the published scientific record.

By becoming signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, these two major chemical societies are voicing their intent to collect ORCID iDs for all submitting authors through use of the ORCID API, and to display such identifiers in the articles published in their respective society journals. The integration of such activities within the publishers’ workflows means authors will benefit from automated linkages between their ORCID record and unique identifiers embedded within their published research articles, ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

During the publishing process, ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry will automatically deposit publications to Crossref, which in turn will coordinate with ORCID to link and update the publishing activity populated to authors’ respective ORCID profiles, thus attributing each published work to the correct researcher. Existing holders of an ORCID iD will encounter a one-time prompt to grant permission for the linkage. If authors do not have an ORCID iD, they can easily enroll without navigating away from the publishers’ manuscript submission site. If users wish to revoke integrated ORCID profile access at any time, they can elect to do so through their ACS, Royal Society of Chemistry or ORCID accounts.

Both ACS Publications and the Royal Society of Chemistry understand the importance of attributing accurately the scholarly contributions of research scientists in the context of their other professional activities. “ACS has supported ORCID since the outset of the initiative,” says Sarah Tegen, Ph.D., Vice President of Global Editorial & Author Services at ACS Publications. “We are pleased now to align with the Royal Society of Chemistry in this endeavor, as both societies underscore our willingness not only to encourage and assist our respective authors in establishing their unique ORCID profiles, but also to help tackle the broader challenge of researcher name disambiguation in the scholarly literature. With the integration of author ORCID iDs in our publishing workflows, we will ensure that researchers receive proper credit for their accomplishments.”

Emma Wilson, Ph.D., Director of Publishing at the Royal Society of Chemistry adds, “We have been a supporter of ORCID since 2013, recognizing the benefits it brings to researchers; ORCID can and will make a huge difference to our authors’ ability to gain full credit for their work. ORCID will also help researchers meet the requirements of their research funders — for example, a number of funders have already announced that all grant applicants must now include a researcher’s ORCID iD. A unified system that integrates and links research-related information with accurate and timely linkage to the publishing output of authors has the potential to simplify and speed up their grant applications — something we know is important to researchers.”

“The ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry have been long-standing supporters of ORCID,” says Laurel Haak, Ph.D., Executive Director, ORCID. “We are pleased to see ORCID integration into ACS and Royal Society of Chemistry Publications systems. This will be a substantial benefit to researchers in the chemistry community, both in improving search and discovery of research articles, and for attribution and recognition of researchers’ contributions to the discipline.”

About the American Chemical Society and ACS Publications

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

ACS Publications, a division of the American Chemical Society, is a nonprofit scholarly publisher of 50 peer-reviewed journals and a range of eBooks at the interface of chemistry and allied sciences, including physics and biology. ACS Publications journals are among the most-cited, most-trusted and most-read within the scientific literature. Respected for their editorial rigor, ACS journals offer high-quality service to authors and readers, including rapid time to publication, a range of channels for researchers to access ACS Publications’ award-winning web and mobile delivery platforms, and a comprehensive program of open access publishing options for authors and their funders. ACS Publications also publishes Chemical & Engineering News — the Society’s newsmagazine covering science and technology, business and industry, government and policy, education and employment aspects of the chemistry field.

About the Royal Society of Chemistry

The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world’s leading chemistry community, advancing excellence in the chemical sciences. With over 50,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the U.K.’s professional body for chemical scientists; a not-for-profit organisation with 175 years of history and an international vision for the future. We promote, support and celebrate chemistry. We work to shape the future of the chemical sciences — for the benefit of science and humanity.

About ORCID

ORCID’s vision is a world where all who participate in research, scholarship and innovation are uniquely identified and connected to their contributions across disciplines, borders and time. ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities. It provides open tools that enable transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions and affiliations. The organization provides this service to help people find information and to simplify reporting and analysis. ORCID is a not-for-profit organization, sustained by fees from member organizations. Its work is open, transparent and non-proprietary. The organization strives to be a trusted component of research infrastructure with the goal of providing clarity in the breadth of research contributions and the people who make them.

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Introducing our new Associate Editor

We are delighted to introduce Wei-Guo as a new Associate Editor for Environmental Science: Nano.

Wei-Guo joins Greg Lowry, Iseult Lynch and Kristin Schirmer as Associate Editors handling submissions to the journal.

Dr. Wei-Guo Song is a Professor in the Institute of Chemistry at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (ICCAS). He is also a Professor at the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences. He obtained his BSc. from Peking University in 1992, and his PhD from University of Southern California in 2001. He joined ICCAS in 2005, and received National Distinguished Young Scholar award in 2007.

His research group focuses on the design of nano porous materials and their properties. More specifically, he is interested in using nano porous materials as adsorbents for inorganic pollutants, and as heterogeneous catalysts for catalytic degradation of organic pollutants. He is also interested in developing high performance catalysts including noble metal catalysts, solid acid/base catalysts, non-metal catalysts, etc. for fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

———-

Please join us in welcoming Wei-Guo to Environmental Science: Nano.

Interested in the latest news, research and events of the Environmental Science journals? Find us on Twitter: @EnvSciRSC

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Environmental Science: Nano winners at ICEENN

Nano 2015 logo

Many congratulations to Olga Zaytseva and Miguel Ángel Gómez González on their poster prize success at the 10th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials, which took place from 6th-10th September 2015 at the University of Vienna, Austria.

As one of the globally leading conferences on environmental nanoscience and nanoecotoxicology, the 10th ICEENN brought together researchers, regulators and industry to discuss the recent advances in the investigations of risks of current and future applications in the key sector of nanotechnology, along with procedures of risk management to maintain the economic and social benefits of the sector. Sessions dealt with key research areas such as analysis of nanomaterials, toxicology and ecotoxicology, and innovation and applications of nanotechnology to environmental issues.

Olga Zaytseva of Hohenheim University, Stuttgart, produced a winning poster entitled ‘Phytotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in soybean (Glycine max.)‘, while Miguel Ángel Gómez González of the Spanish National Research Council, Madrid, won with his poster entitled ‘Arsenic speciation in contaminated soils by AF4/SP-ICPMS and XAS techniques: Role of colloids in the mobilization of arsenic‘.

The judges of the prizes thought the quality of the presentations and posters was really high and, from the Environmental Science: Nano team, we would like to thank all the students that attended or presented at the meeting.

For more details on ICEENN 2015 please visit the conference website.

Presentation for the prize winners of ICEENN 2015

Many congratulations on this achievement from the Environmental Science: Nano team

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2015 SNO Emerging Investigator

The SNO Emerging Investigator designation gives recognition to emerging scientists and engineers working in the area of sustainable nanotechnology.  In recognition of this designation, a certificate and a US$1500 prize will be presented at the 2015 SNO Conference.

Criteria and eligibility include:

  1. Investigators who are within the first 10 years post Ph.D.
  2. An impactful body of independent work and publications in the area of sustainable nanotechnology: environmental, societal, or economic.
  3. Attendance at the 2015 SNO Conference in Portland, Oregon November 8th – 10th 2015 and a high quality paper submission to Environmental Science: Nano within one year after receiving the award.

The nomination consists of a single (1-page max) nomination letter, a second (1-page max) support letter and a 2-page CV (self-nominations are not accepted). The nomination letter should describe how the nominee’s research impacts the field of sustainable nanotechnology.

The support letter should focus on the nominee’s teaching, service and leadership in the field of sustainable nanotechnology. Both the nomination and support letters can be made by SNO members and Environmental Science: Nano Editorial and Advisory  Board members.  Nominations are not restricted to the US or UK.

Letters and CVs are due to Environmental Science: Nano Editor-in-Chief Vicki H. Grassian (vicki-grassian@uiowa.edu) by September 15, 2015.

The selected Emerging Investigator will be honored at the SNO Awards dinner on Sunday November 8, 2015.

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2nd National Environmental Eco-Toxicology Conference

The 2nd National Environmental Eco-Toxicology Conference was held in Xiamen, China, 25th-28th of April, 2015.

This exciting conference was jointly organised by the Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Xiamen University and the Institute of Urban Environment of CAS.

More than 700 attendees shared new ideas and recent development on the are six topics discussed during this conference:

  • Screening and assessment of high risk chemical contaminants
  • Transfer and distribution of chemical contaminants in the environment and organisms
  • Chemical hazards evaluation
  • Toxicology mechanism of chemical ecology
  • Toxicological mechanism of chemical health effects
  • Chemical risk management


During the conference, the Environmental Science (ES) journals sponsored three poster prizes. Let’s introduce the winners!

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts: ‘Study on the toxicity behavior of organic phosphate ester flame retardant to pattern fish’, by Liwei Sun (Zhejiang Institute of Technology)

Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology: ‘Bioaccumulation behaviour of short chain chlorinated paraffins in Antarctic ecosystem’, by Huijuan Li and Aiqian Zhang (Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences)

Environmental Science: Nano: ‘Proinflammatory effects of silver nanoparticles and silver ions on human skin keratinocytes’, by Yang Di, Wei Hong-ying, Wang Bin, Fan Jing-pu, Qin Yu, Liu Yue, Guo Xin-biao and Deng Fu-rong (Peking Universty)

Congratulations to all the winners!

The judges of the prize thought the quality of the posters was really high and, from the Environmental Science team, we would like to thank all the researchers that attended or presented at the conference.

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Environmental Science: Nano

Here is a few reminders of the great benefits of publishing with Environmental Science: Nano:

Free colour on all figures

– No page charges or limits

Fast Publication (<100 days on average)

– Wide exposure: free access to all content for the first two years after launch*

– Individual promotion of HOT articles

– Papers processed by peers in the field

– High quality content

– Indexed in ISI

– Free electronic reprints

NIH Compliant

– Simple and effective submission process


Submit now!

*Environmental Science: Nano was launched in 2014. Access is free through a registered RSC Publishing account.

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John Jeyes Award 2014

Professor Vicki Grassian, Chair of Environmental Science: Nano was awarded the John Jeyes Award 2014 this week for her pioneering contributions to the chemistry of environmental interfaces, heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and the environmental implications of nanomaterials.

The John Jeyes Award, founded in 1975, is a biennial award for chemistry in relation to the environment. John Jeyes was a prolific inventor and scientist who in 1877 invented one of the first disinfectants, which is still used today. This is one of the six awards and prizes that are given by the Environment, Sustainability and Energy Division of the Royal Society of Chemistry.


The picture shows Environmental Science:Nano Executive Editor, Harpal Minhas, presenting
Vicki Grassian with the John Jeyes award at the 2014 SNO Conference.

Vicki Grassian, Founding Director of the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Institute at the University of Iowa, has mentored over one hundred students and postdocs in her laboratory with many of them now having their own research programs focused on energy and the environment and developed the chemical sciences track of the undergraduate degree program in environmental science.


“The John Jeyes Award is wonderful recognition of the research that has been done by the students and postdoctoral associates who have worked in my laboratory”


We would like to congratulate Vicki on her achievement and take this opportunity to thank her for her pioneering contributions to Environmental Science: Nano , bringing together a variety of communities to publish their work on nanoscience and the implications for the environment, health and sustainability.

Vicki’s latest Environmental Science: Nano paper ‘Iron oxide nanoparticles induce Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, induce biofilm formation and inhibit antimicrobial peptide function‘ (C3EN00029J) is included in a dedicated themed collection of papers celebrating the 2014 RSC Prize and Award winners.


Each year the Royal Society of Chemistry gives out over 60 awards and prizes that recognise excellence in the chemical sciences. Our 2015 awards and prizes are open for nomination now, why not nominate someone today?

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SNO Emerging Investigator

And the winner is….Debora Rodrigues

The SNO Emerging Investigator gives recognition to emerging scientists and engineers working in the area of Sustainable Nanotechnology. Environmental Science: Nano is pleased to announce the inaugural winner is Professor Debora Rodrigues. Professor Rodrigues research on carbon-based materials is well recognized and covers both applications of nanomaterials for improving water quality and implications on the safety of nanomaterials.  As an independent investigator, she has published widely in these areas.  In 2012 she received a U.S. National Science Early CAREER Award  “Toxicology of graphene-based nanomaterials: A molecular biotechnology approach”.  At the University of Houston, Professor Rodrigues is known as an outstanding researcher, a passionate educator and a role model.  Editor-in-Chief Vicki Grassian says that Professor Rodrigues was selected because of her pioneering and outstanding contributions to the field of sustainable nanotechnology including nanotoxicology and applications of nanotechnology in water remediation.


The picture shows Environmental Science: Nano Editor-in-Chief, Vicki Grassian (Left) and Executive Editor, Harpal Minhas (right) presenting Debora Rodrigues (middle) with her award at the 2014 SNO Conference.


About Debora

After completing her Ph.D. in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Michigan State University in 2007, Debora moved to Yale University focusing her research on investigating the antimicrobial effects of carbon nanotubes on viruses and bacteria as well as their impact on soil microbial community. In 2010 she became an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Houston.

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Most accessed Environmental Science: Nano articles in Q2 2014


Here are the Top 10 most accessed Environmental Science:Nano articles from April – June 2014

Surface chemistry, charge and ligand type impact the toxicity of gold nanoparticles to <it>Daphnia magna</it>
Jared S. Bozich, Samuel E. Lohse, Marco D. Torelli, Catherine J. Murphy, Robert J. Hamers and Rebecca D. Klaper
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 260-270
DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00006D

Recent advances in BiOX (X = Cl, Br and I) photocatalysts: synthesis, modification, facet effects and mechanisms
Liqun Ye, Yurong Su, Xiaoli Jin, Haiquan Xie and Can Zhang
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 90-112
DOI: 10.1039/C3EN00098B

Zeolite and mesoporous silica nanomaterials: greener syntheses, environmental applications and biological toxicity
Sean E. Lehman and Sarah C. Larsen
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 200-213
DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00031E

Tracking dissolution of silver nanoparticles at environmentally relevant concentrations in laboratory, natural, and processed waters using single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS)
D. M. Mitrano, J. F. Ranville, A. Bednar, K. Kazor, A. S. Hering and C. P. Higgins
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 248-259
DOI: 10.1039/C3EN00108C

Synthesis and characterization of isotopically labeled silver nanoparticles for tracing studies
Adam Laycock, Björn Stolpe, Isabella Römer, Agnieszka Dybowska, Eugenia Valsami-Jones, Jamie R. Lead and Mark Rehkämper
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 271-283
DOI: 10.1039/C3EN00100H

Green synthesis and formation mechanism of cellulose nanocrystal-supported gold nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic performance
Xiaodong Wu, Canhui Lu, Zehang Zhou, Guiping Yuan, Rui Xiong and Xinxing Zhang
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 71-79
DOI: 10.1039/C3EN00066D

Localized fluorescent complexation enables rapid monitoring of airborne nanoparticles
Fanxu Meng, Maria D. King, Yassin A. Hassan and Victor M. Ugaz
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 358-366
DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00017J

Deposition of nanoparticles onto polysaccharide-coated surfaces: implications for nanoparticle–biofilm interactions
Kaoru Ikuma, Andrew S. Madden, Alan W. Decho and Boris L. T. Lau
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 117-122
DOI: 10.1039/C3EN00075C

Silver nanoparticle protein corona composition compared across engineered particle properties and environmentally relevant reaction conditions
Richard Eigenheer, Erick R. Castellanos, Meagan Y. Nakamoto, Kyle T. Gerner, Alyssa M. Lampe and Korin E. Wheeler
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 238-247
DOI: 10.1039/C4EN00002A

Bioavailability of inorganic nanoparticles to planktonic bacteria and aquatic microalgae in freshwater
Nadia von Moos, Paul Bowen and Vera I. Slaveykova
Environ. Sci.: Nano, 2014,1, 214-232
DOI: 10.1039/C3EN00054K

Take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Environmental Science: Nano? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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Environmental Effects of Nano International Conference

The 9th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials

September 7-11, 2014


The 9th International Conference on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials (Nano2014) aims to bring together researchers, regulators, and industry to discuss the potential hazards and risks of current and future applications in the key sector of nanotechnology, along with mechanisms to bring about risk reduction while maintaining economic and social benefits.

Human exposure and hazard will be key aspects of the conference and the program will contain multiple sessions related to:

1) physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles as related to the environment and health,

2) fate, behavior and transformations,

3) toxicology and ecotoxicology,

4) social and regulatory sciences,

5) innovation and applications of nanotechnology to environmental and health issues.

Don’t miss out – submit your abstracts by 15th June 2014!

Registration can be completed online and you must be registered by 30th June 2014 in order to attend this conference

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