Emerging Investigator Series: Jingkun Jiang

We are delighted to introduce our latest Environmental Science: Nano Emerging Investigator, Jingkun Jiang! 

Dr. Jingkun Jiang is a professor at School of Environment, Tsinghua University.  He received a BS and a MS in Environmental Science and Engineering from Tsinghua University.  He holds a PhD degree in Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis.  Prior to joining Tsinghua in 2010, he worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Particle Technology Laboratory of Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Minnesota.

Dr. Jiang’s research activities involve various topics in aerosol science and technology. He has published 90 peer-reviewed journal articles.  He received a number of awards including  Smoluchowski award (2018), Asian Young Aerosol Scientist Award (2015), and A&WMA Doctoral Dissertation Award (2009).  He is serving as an editor for Aerosol Science & Technology, a guest editor for Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics, an editorial board member for Journal of Aerosol Science, and the deputy director for State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control.

Read his recent Emerging Investigator Series article: “Dispersed transition metals on a nitrogen-doped carbon nanoframework for environmental hydrogen peroxide detection” and find out more about him in his interview below:

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on environmental hydrogen peroxide detection using a nitrogen doped carbon nanoframework. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

My first article as the leading author is entitled “model for nanoparticle charging by diffusion, direct photoionization, and thermionization mechanisms”.  Over the years, our research activities have involved various topics in aerosol science and technology:  aerosol instrumentation; particle formation and emission from combustion sources; atmospheric new particle formation; synthesis and application of aerosol nanoparticles; aerosol nanotoxicology; metagenomics of airborne microorganism.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

The most excited aspect is to work with talented students to address questions that have puzzled me and others for years.

In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage of the presented method for the detection of H2O2 over traditional methods?

A grand challenge for many disciplines is to develop/adopt emerging data acquisition technologies (e.g. sensors) and big-data analysis. In comparison to traditional methods, the presented method is an example towards this direction using nanotechnologies.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

Finding a balance between working (research, teaching, and service) and spending time with family.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

International aerosol conference 2018; Asian aerosol conference 2019; European aerosol conference 2019

How do you spend your spare time?

Spending time with family and playing with kids; biking; traveling.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

A farmer

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Understand that the challenges can be different when working in different countries and stay focused at the beginning.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Emerging Investigator Series: Leanne Gilbertson

Dr. Gilbertson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Before joining the faculty, Dr. Gilbertson was a postdoctoral associate in the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale University where she focused on elucidating and validating engineered nanomaterial structure-property-function and structure-property-hazard parametric relationships. She received her MS and PhD degrees from Yale University in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, supported through an NSF Graduate Research and EPA STAR Fellowships. She received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry with a minor in education from Hamilton College in 2007, after which she spent several years as a secondary school teacher before returning to graduate school. Her research group at the University of Pittsburgh is currently engaged in projects aimed at informing sustainable design of emerging materials and technologies proposed for use in areas at the nexus of the environment and public health. Dr. Gilbertson is the recipient of the 3M non-tenured faculty award and the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award. To find out more about her research group, please visit leannegilbertson.com and follow her on Twitter @lmgLab.

Read her Emerging Investigator Series article: “It’s not all about the ion: support for particle-specific contributions to silver nanoparticle antimicrobial activity and find out more about her in the interview below:

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on support for particle-specific contributions to silver nanoparticle antimicrobial activity. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

Silver is a fascinating element, particularly when it takes the form of a nanoparticle and we start manipulating particle parameters such as size, shape and surface chemistry. To date, we are unable to predict the complex behavior of silver nanoparticles when they are introduced into natural (and even laboratory) systems. Yet, the ability to do so has the potential to advance innovative solutions to relevant global challenges. One particular challenge central to this current work is the rise in antimicrobial resistance.

We are tackling fundamental questions surrounding the chemical behavior of silver nanoparticles in biologically relevant systems. Ultimately, we seek to better learn how to leverage particle design to tune behavior for different applications. Our work published earlier this year in ES: Nano highlights the influence of different biological growth media chemistries on the evolution of silver ion release and particle surface chemistry, which differentially impacted the measured cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles. This Emerging Investigator Series paper aims to bridge the fundamental science and applications of silver nanoparticles by identifying open questions surrounding how particle parameters influence cytotoxicity and important methodological considerations towards isolating contributions of the nanoparticle and the released ions. Informed by findings from this study, we are experimentally targeting specific particle parameters to better resolve the multi-faceted, dynamic interactions between silver nanoparticles and microbial systems.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

Findings in this paper identify key gaps in our mechanistic understanding of silver nanoparticle-bacteria interactions. These gaps hinder our ability to rationally design nanoparticles and tune properties for different applications. As a result of this work, we now have an experimental roadmap to pursue research that fills these gaps and answers critical fundamental research questions. Pursuing these questions will have significant influence on how we use silver nanoparticles as antimicrobials, having a positive impact public and environmental health.

In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage of using nanoparticles for antimicrobial agents?

Nanoparticles have multiple facets (size, surface chemistry, shape) that we can control and there are many possible combinations of the particle parameters to explore for enhancing antimicrobial selectivity and efficacy. The antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles, in particular, are what makes them so attractive for use in wide ranging applications such as coatings for medical devices and food preparation surfaces, incorporation into wound dressings, antifoulants, and disinfectants in water treatment. In addition, nanoparticles introduce the ability to deliver multiple mechanisms of action to a target organism, which is of particular interest to designing solutions that combat antimicrobial resistance. A lot has been learned from the ‘antimicrobial age’ in terms of what not to do. The design of next generation antimicrobials must be grounded in fundamental science and consider human behavior. We are not suggesting that nanoparticles will be a drop-in replacement for chemical antimicrobials, rather that we need to be thoughtful about how we design them, where and how we use them.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

The most challenging and exciting aspect of this research is working with a complex and unpredictable material system in a complex and oftentimes ill-defined biological system. There are many factors to consider in trying to isolate particle influences on cytotoxicity, which involves extensive analytical characterization and makes designing experiments particularly challenging (just ask my student and lead author, Lisa!). Another challenge is the fact that silver nanoparticles have been extensively studied and therefore, it is assumed that we know everything there is to know about silver nanoparticles in environmental and biologically-relevant systems. A primary motivation to pursue the research described in this Emerging Investigator Series paper was to show the exciting and important research questions that remain. There is still much to learn mechanistically about how these particles behave and this information is necessary to inform how to intentionally manipulate the material based on the exposure environment and intended application.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I always enjoy meeting new people and catching up with colleagues at conferences. This fall I will be co-chairing a session at the upcoming ACS national meeting in Boston August 19-23, 2018. I will be presenting at my first AIChE annual meeting, which will be held here in Pittsburgh October 28-November 2, 2018. I also look forward to participating in the Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization conference November 8-10, 2018 in DC and the QEEN II workshop October 9-10, 2018 in DC.

How do you spend your spare time?

In my ‘spare’ time, I enjoy running, gardening, and anything that enables me to spend as much time outside as possible. The outdoors and physical activity help clear my mind and recalibrate.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Teaching. This is kind of a cop out because I get to do this now, but it is only one part of my job. I find it incredibly rewarding to motivate and inspire others through science and to work with and mentor students. I taught high school chemistry and coached soccer and lacrosse before going to graduate school. This was one of the most enjoyable jobs I’ve ever had.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Scientists and engineers are inherently curious and interested in solving problems. My advice would be to find a project that you are truly interested in so that your inherent curiosity motivates the work you do.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NANOCON 2018 – 10th Anniversary International Conference on Nanomaterials – Research & Application

NANOCON 2018 – 10th Anniversary International Conference on Nanomaterials – Research & Application
17th (10 a.m.) – 19th (1 p.m.) October 2018
Hotel Voronez I, Brno, Czech Republic, EU
https://www.nanocon.eu

Conference abstracts will be accepted into five themed sessions:

  • Nanomaterials for Electronic, Magnetic and Optic Applications. Carbon Nanostructures, Quantum Dots.
  • Industrial and Environmental Applications of Nanomaterials.
  • Bionanotechnology, Nanomaterials in Medicine.
  • Monitoring and Toxicity of Nanomaterials.
  • Advanced Methods of Preparation and Characterization of Nanomaterials.

Highly ranked keynote and invited speakers already confirmed their attendance. The plenary lectures will be given by Prof. Dr. Paras N. Prasat (University at Buffalo, New York State, U.S.A.) focusing on photonics and biology to impact on energy and health care, and Prof. Dr. Antonio H. Castro Neto (National University of Singapore and Boston University/USA), one of the leading theorists in the study of graphene.

Confirmed speakers include also: Prof. Dr. Wilfried Vandervorst (IMEC, Leuven, Belgium), Prof. Dr. Andrei V. Kabashin(CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, France), Dr. Antonín Fejfar (Institute of Physics CAS, Prague, Czech Republic), Prof. Dr. Karl-Heinz Ernst (Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf, Switzerland) and others. More on Invited speakers is available at the web page of the conference here.

Important deadlines:

  • Abstract submission 31st August
  • Registration 17th September
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Emerging Investigator Series: Liwu Zhang

Prof. Liwu Zhang joined the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at Fudan University in November 2014. Prior to his faculty appointment, he did his postdoctoral work under the supervision of Prof. Jeremy J. Baumberg (FRS) at the Nanophotonics Centre in Cavendish Laboratory and collaborated with Dr. Erwin Reisner from the Department of Chemistry at University of Cambridge. Before that, he was an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow under the supervision of Prof. Detlef Bahnemann in the Hannover University. He received a PhD in Chemistry from Tsinghua University under the supervision of Prof. Yongfa Zhu. He is a recipient of the Marie Curie Intra-European Research Fellow award. He has over a decade of experience in environmental chemistry and a strong background in environmental nanotechnology and has published more than 50 highly cited papers in this field. His work have been cited for >3000 times, and he has an h-index of 25.

Read his Emerging Investigators series article: ‘Heterogeneous reactions of sulfur dioxide on mineral dust nanoparticles: from single component to mixed components” and find out more about him in the interview below:

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on heterogeneous reactions of sulfur dioxide on mineral dust nanoparticles. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

My first article focused on fabricating nanoparticles for photocatalytic pollutants decomposition. Before I joined Fudan University in 2014, most of my research work were related to photocatalysis for environment and energy application. In 2014, I went back from UK to China and begun my independent research career, it was also the time that haze problem was very serious in China and attracting wide public attention. I am very curious about the chemistry process during the formation of particulate matters (PM2.5) in the atmosphere. The heterogeneous reaction plays an important role in the formation and growth of PM2.5. Therefore, I started my research in this field, as reported in this Emerging Investigator Series paper.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

Find the reason and make the sky blue again in China.

In your opinion, what is the most important environmental implication of heterogeneous reactions of sulfur dioxide on mineral dust nanoparticles?

Formation of sulfate aerosols through heterogeneous conversion of SO2 is of great concern worldwide; however, the detailed mechanism is still not comprehensively understood. Particles in haze are complex mixtures comprising various species, and limited attention has been paid to the heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 on multi-composition aerosols up to now. This work could help understand the adsorption of SO2 on multicomposition aerosols and provide important parameters for atmospheric chemistry models.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

Sensitive in situ techniques for the study of heterogeneous reaction.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

Conference on Environmental Science or Environmental nanotechnology.

How do you spend your spare time?

Play with my 3 years old daughter and 10 months old son.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Electronic engineer.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Stay hungry, stay foolish.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

NanoTox 2018 – 9th International Conference on Nanotoxicology

NanoTox 2018 – 9th International Conference on Nanotoxicology will take place this year between 18th-21st September 2018 at Dorint-Hotel Neuss, Germany. 

NanoTox Logo

The special focus of NanoTox 2018 will be “New tools in risk assessment of nanomaterials” such as read-across, grouping and categorization. This event will offer a platform for all interested scientists, industry partners and regulatory bodies to discuss the latest results and developments in nanosafety research.

The full list of plenary speakers is available on the conference website including the portal to submit posters and register before the deadline below.

Key deadlines: 

Last Minute Poster Submissions 29 June 2018

Early Bird Registration 20 July 2018

Appearance in the list of participants 31 August 2018

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing our New Associate Editors – John Fortner & Zhang Lin

We are delighted to announce that Professor John Fortner (Washington University in St. Louis, USA) and Professor Zhang Lin (South China University of Technology, China) join the Environmental Science: Nano team as Associate Editors.

Professor Fortner and Professor Lin join Iseult Lynch, Joel Pedersen, Kristin Schirmer and Wei-Guo Song as Associate Editors handling the peer review of submissions to the journal.

John Fortner is the InCEES Career Development Associate Professor at Washington University in St. Louis. His research is primarily focused on advancing water-related technologies and engineering novel material interfaces as they relate to critical environmental-based health, security and energy challenges. He has extensively studied the environmental fate, (photo) reactivity and applications (e.g. novel water treatment membranes) of engineered carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene-based materials.

Read John’s recent ES:Nano paper on Superparamagnetic nanomaterials for As and Cr sorption

Submit your high impact work to Professor Fortners’s office: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/esn

 

Zhang Lin is a Professor in School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology. Her research group focuses on the crystal growth kinetics of nanoparticles and the relevant environmental applications. More specifically, she is interested in recycling of heavy metal from nanowaste, especially from industrial sludge or from nano-adsorbents after usage. She is also interested in studying the bio-mineralization processes of heavy metals by indigenous microorganism, the structure, properties, and transformation of biogenic nanoparticles.

Read Zhang’s latest ES:Nano paper on Lead adsoption by Ti3AlC2 nanomaterials

Submit your high impact work to Professor Lin’s office: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/esn

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Emerging Investigator Series – Peng Wang

We are delighted to introduce our first Environmental Science: Nano Emerging Investigator of 2018, Peng Wang!

Professor Peng Wang is currently an associate professor in the Environmental Science and Engineering program at KAUST. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) in 2008 and started his independent research as an assistant professor at KAUST in 2009. His research focuses on rational design, synthesis, and application of nanomaterials toward sustainable-energy driven clean water production.

Read his Emerging Investigator Series article The rise of nano-enabled photothermal materials for water evaporation and clean water production by sunlight and find out more about him in the interview below:

1. Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on the rise of photothermal materials for clean water production. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

Solar-driven water evaporation and distillation is an ancient technology, but has been rejuvenated in the past four years thanks to the contribution from nanotechnology. I did not work on this until early 2015. Ever since, my group has been working on photothermal nanomaterial selection and optimization along with photothermal structural design. Our first paper on this topic was in July 2015 in which we reported a solar-to-water-evaporation efficiency of 56%. In our latest work, we could achieve a nearly 100% energy efficiency. We have very recently extended our research on photothermal materials into new applications, including atmospheric water harvesting, highly viscous oil spill cleanup, smart windows, etc.

2. What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

The potential to produce more energy efficient water production/treatment technologies and to bring benefits to the society.

3. In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage of solar-driven nano-enabled clean water production over traditional methods?

The CO2 emission free is the biggest advantage of solar-driven nano-enabled clean water production. It also offers hope towards green and zero-liquid discharge desalination processes.

4. What do you find most challenging about your research?

Scaling up of the technologies is very challenging as cost consideration along with other unexpected problems often come along and frustrate me.

5. In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I will be attending IWA LET at Nanjing this may and Gordon Research Conference on Solar Energy Conversion at Hong Kong in June. I, along with my colleague, Professor Suzana Nunes, are putting together a symposium on Nano-Enabled Water Technologies: Opportunities and Challenges, to be held at KAUST tentatively in March 2019.

6. How do you spend your spare time?

I do and enjoy regular mid-distance running and play regular badminton games with friends.

7. Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Probably a lawyer, which is my wife’s profession. Haha, I actually never give this possibility any serious thoughts.

8. Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

As a passionate environmental nano scientist who actually spent his entire PhD working on soil, I would say ‘it takes very bold courage to give up on the old and start the new. However, your passion will always take you to the right place.’

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Outstanding Reviewers for Environmental Science: Nano in 2017

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Environmental Science: Nano in 2017, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Arturo Keller, University of California Santa Barbara

Dr Cyrill Bussy, University of Manchester

Dr Dana Kuehnel, UFZ Centre for Environmental Research

Dr Jose Peralta-Videa, University of Texas at El Paso

Dr Laura  Sigg, Eawag

Dr Matteo Minghetti, Oklahoma State University

Dr Navid Saleh, University of Texas at Austin

Dr Patricia Holden, University of California Santa Barbara

Professor Xiangke Wang, North China Electric Power University

Dr Zhang Lin, South China University of Technology

We would also like to thank the Environmental Science: Nano board and the Environmental Nanotechnology community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing our New Associate Editor – Joel Pedersen

We are delighted to announce that Professor Joel Pedersen  joins the Environmental Science: Nano team as an Associate Editor.

 

Professor Pedersen joins Greg Lowry, Iseult Lynch, Kristin Schirmer and Wei-Guo Song as Associate Editors handling the peer review of submissions to the journal. More information about his research interests is given below:

Professor Pedersen holds appointments in the Departments of Soil Science, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he serves as a Research Theme Leader in the NSF-funded Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology. His research focuses primarily on environmental interfacial chemistry, in particular the interfacial processes affecting the behavior of nanoparticles, biomacromolecules, and organic microcontaminants in natural and engineered environments.

 

Submit your high impact work to Professor Pedersen’s office:

 mc.manuscriptcentral.com/esn


Read a recent Open Access paper by Joel Pedersen published in Environmental Science: Nano:

Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles
Eric S. Melby, Arielle C. Mensch, Samuel E. Lohse, Dehong Hu, Galya Orr, Catherine J. Murphy, Robert J. Hamers and Joel A. Pedersen

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New Editorial Board members for Environmental Science: Nano

We are delighted to announce three new members are joining the Environmental Science: Nano Editorial Board!

Dr. Zhang Lin is a Professor in School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology. Her research group focuses on the crystal growth kinetics of nanoparticles and the relevant environmental applications. More specifically, she is interested in recycling of heavy metal from nanowaste, especially from industrial sludge or from nano-adsorbents after usage. She is also interested in studying the bio-mineralization processes of heavy metals by indigenous microorganism, the structure, properties, and transformation of biogenic nanoparticles.
Dr Jerome Rose is CNRS Senior Scientist at the CEREGE Laboratory and serves as adjunct faculty at Rice and Duke Universities (USA). His research focuses on the behaviour and toxicity of colloids and contaminants from laboratory to field scale. He is employing intensively synchrotron and Lab Xray-based techniques to study mechanisms at a molecular level. Since 2001 he has been involved in research on the environmental and health implications of nanotechnologies. His group determined the molecular and thermodynamic mechanisms responsible of the enhanced reactivity of iron nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm and discovered double wall Ge-imogolite nanotubes. More recently the team unravelled the environmental exposure level and mechanisms to nanoparticles from various commercial products by taking into account the various stages of their life cycle.
Nathalie Tufenkji earned the Ph.D. degree in Chemical and Environmental Engineering from Yale University in 2005. She is presently Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at McGill University where she holds the Tier I Canada Research Chair in Biocolloids and Surfaces. She works in the area of (bio)colloid-surface interactions with applications in protection of water resources, antimicrobial materials, and sustainable nanotechnologies for use in environmental remediation, agriculture and medicine.

Read some of the high-impact research published in Environmental Science: Nano by our new Editorial Board members below:

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii displays aversive swimming response to silver nanoparticles
Michael R. Mitzel, Nicholas Lin, Joann K. Whalen and Nathalie Tufenkji

Enhanced removal of roxarsone by Fe3O4@3D graphene nanocomposites: synergistic adsorption and mechanism
Chen Tian, Jian Zhao, Jing Zhang, Shengqi Chu, Zhi Dang, Zhang Lin and Baoshan Xing

Structural and physical–chemical behavior of a CeOnanoparticle based diesel additive during combustion and environmental release
M. Auffan, M. Tella, W. Liu, A. Pariat, M. Cabié, D. Borschneck, B. Angeletti, G. Landrot, C. Mouneyrac, L. Giambérini and J. Rose

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)