Archive for the ‘Themed Collections’ Category

Aquatic Photochemistry Themed Issue

The field of aquatic photochemistry is diverse and strong, therefore our Editorial Board member, Kristopher McNeill presents a themed issue covering a range of topics and sub-disciplines within environmental science, representing current aquatic photochemical research.

Kristopher found the process of guest editing the aquatic photochemistry themed issue rewarding. ‘From the very start, I had an enthusiastic response to my call for papers and, when looking at the collection in its final form, I was extremely happy with the quality and breadth of the science that it reflected’ he says.

‘I was especially happy with the contributions of the young investigators; from whom I am sure we will be seeing a lot more in the future.’ Kristopher selected 2 critical reviews and a paper by young investigators who contributed to this collection and for a limited time only, these articles are free* to access. Click the following links to download the full articles.

Critical Reviews:

Photo-transformation of pharmaceutically active compounds in the aqueous environment: a review
Shuwen Yan and Weihua Song
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00502J

The role of indirect photochemical degradation in the environmental fate of pesticides: a review
Christina K. Remucal
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00549F

Paper:

Photometric hydroxyl radical scavenging analysis of standard natural organic matter isolates
J. E. Donham, E. J. Rosenfeldt and K. R. Wigginton
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00663H

Kristopher’s research paper on photochemically produced hydroxyl radical in artic surface water was included in this collection. We would like to thank him for guest editing this exciting issue; his paper will be free* to access until Friday 20th June 2014.

Evidence for dissolved organic matter as the primary source and sink of photochemically produced hydroxyl radical in arctic surface waters
Sarah E. Page, J. Robert Logan, Rose M. Cory and Kristopher McNeill
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00596H

*Access is free until 20.06.14 through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Passive Sampling Themed Issue

Philipp Mayer, Frank Wania and Charles S. Wong introduce an Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts themed issue on passive sampling.

This themed collection showcases some of the latest developments in passive sampling research – which has now progressed well beyond measuring aqueous concentrations of legacy contaminants. The contributions in this collection contain a wide range of different passive sampling approaches which were applied to water, air, soil vapours, sediments and even fish tissue. Improved sampler designs and materials are being developed and tested, contributing to the increasing popularity of passive sampling. The apparent simplicity of passive sampling is at the core of its true potential and betrays a wealth of opportunity for future research and monitoring.

To celebrate this collection, the following articles are free* to access – for a limited time only!

Passive sampling systems for ambient air mercury measurements

A review of passive sampling systems for ambient air mercury measurements
Jiaoyan Huang, Seth N. Lyman, Jelena Stamenkovic Hartman and Mae Sexauer Gustin
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00501A

Application of passive sampling methods for measurement of Hg concentrations and deposition is useful for understanding source and trends.

Evaluation of DGTEvaluation of DGT as a long-term water quality monitoring tool in natural waters; uranium as a case study
Geraldine S. C. Turner, Graham A. Mills, Michael J. Bowes, Jonathan L. Burnett, Sean Amos and Gary R. Fones
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00574G

DGT can be used as a long-term water quality environmental monitoring tool.

Low density polyethylene passive samplers

Field calibration of low density polyethylene passive samplers for gaseous POPs
Mohammed A. Khairy and Rainer Lohmann
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00493G

A field calibration study of low density polyethylene for measuring atmospheric concentrations of persistent organic pollutants was performed in East Providence (RI) USA.

*Access is free until 13.06.14 through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Real time sampling of welding fumes

Sampling from realistic scenarios often poses a problem, however Chang et al. have sampled fume particles from real time welding in order to gain more detailed information on the occupational hazards posed to welders. 

One of the key mechanisms responsible for the cardiopulmonary effects welders may experience is oxidative stress.  It was hypothesised that nanoparticles, resulting from the combustion during welding, would carry the greatest ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) burden for cells.

welding, nanoparticles, occupational healthBy sampling the air as welding was taking place and fractionating it into coarse (2.5–10 µm), fine (0.1–2.5 µm) and nano (<0.1 µm) the group were able to analyse for water-soluble metals, total elemental analysis (49 metals) and ROS using a bio-assay (rat alveolar macrophages).

By comparing the sampling results to the activities being carried out at the time, crucial information was gleaned as to how individual activities uniquely contributed to particulate exposure.  In addition it was confirmed that the nano-sized particles had the highest ROS activity level, suggesting that mass dose may not be the most informative measure of the toxicity associated with these activities.

Anyone interested in air sampling, occupational health and exposure studies and designing experiments to incorporate real-life, real-time scenarios would find this HOT article of interest. It’s in Issue 1 and free to access for the next four weeks* and you can download it here

Physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of welding fume derived particles generated from real time welding processes
Cali Chang, Philip Demokritou, Martin Shaferc and David Christiani
DOI: 10.1039/c2em30505d

 *Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. Registration is quick, free and simple

Published on behalf of Sian Evans, Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts web science writer. Sian is a PhD student based in Bath, United Kingdom

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HOT article: zinc versus zinc oxide nanoparticle toxicity

Zn and ZnO nanoparticles are used in plenty of consumer products, including disinfectants, so compiling information on their toxicity and impact in different environments is crucial to ensure safe usage.

Zikri Arslan at Jackson State University led a team of USA-based researchers to investigate the toxicity of Zn and ZnO nanoparticles in marine aquatic systems. Their study of brine shrimp larvae in sea water published in Issue 1 shows accumulation of the nanoparticles inside the guts and an inability of the shrimp to remove the accumulations.

The shrimp don’t appear to suffer any ill effects over 24 hours, but 96 hours after exposure their mortality rate escalated with the increasing accumulation of nanoparticles. This toxicity is associated with a triggering of oxidative stress.

The team showed that Zn nanoparticles are more toxic to shrimp than zinc oxide nanoparticles in the same conditions and this could be because zinc nanoparticles release more Zn2+ ions. Size is also a factor, with smaller nanoparticles being more toxic than larger ones.

For the detail, have a read of the whole article in Issue 1. Issue 1 is a themed issue on anthropogenic nanoparticles in the environment, which is free to access!*

Comparative evaluation of impact of Zn and ZnO nanoparticles on brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae: effects of particle size and solubility on toxicity
Mehmet Ates, James Daniels, Zikri Arslan, Ibrahim O. Farah and Hilsamar Félix Rivera
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30540B

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. Registration is quick, free and simple

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JEM Emerging Investigators 2012

Our latest issue is dedicated to Emerging Investigators – highlighting the research of the best and brightest young minds in environmental science and engineering. This is the third year we have produced an issue dedicated to new researchers to the field, and we are delighted that 2010 Emerging Investigators David Cwiertny and Tamar Kohn guest edited this issue with us.

David Cwiertny and Tamar Kohn discuss the unique nature of the young environmental science field in their editorial and the challenges facing new researchers, from marketing work to funding agencies to communicating science to the public.

The issue contains plenty of HOT research, including fluvial transport of arsenic, groundwater contamination at an ex-uranium mine, Cr VI formation during chlorination of drinking water, interactions of organic matter and gold nanoparticles, effect of water treatment on antibiotic resistance and improving the measurement accuracy for water-soluble composition of PM2.5.

View the rest of the issue here

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Issue 2 now online – including a collection of articles from AIRMON 2011

Welcome to our second issue of the year, which includes a collection of articles from AIRMON 2011 – the Symposium on Modern Principles of Air Monitoring and Biomonitoring held in Norway last June.  Professor Yngvar Thomassen introduces papers in the issue which cover topics from bioaerosol exposure in the workplace to beryllium exposure, to interlaboratory studies to understand method performance in trace element determination.

The images on the cover both have an aerosol theme, the first highlighting the article from Nils Petter Skaugset et al. presented at AIRMON 2011 on the exposure of aluminium production workers to beryllium,

Occupational exposure to beryllium in primary aluminium production
Nils Petter Skaugset, Dag G. Ellingsen, Kari Dahl, Ivar Martinsen, Lars Jordbekken, Per Arne Drabløs and Yngvar Thomassen
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10539F

The second is from Subbarao V. Ravva et al. on the sampling and influence of environmental conditions on airborne bacteria:

Bacterial communities in urban aerosols collected with wetted-wall cyclonic samplers and seasonal fluctuations of live and culturable airborne bacteria
Subbarao V. Ravva, Bradley J. Hernlem, Chester Z. Sarreal and Robert E. Mandrell
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10753D

The issue also includes our regular Environmental Digest from Mike Sharpe, collating the latest environmental news including the Durban talks, a new directive on waste electrical and electronic equipment and the EU ban on phosphate detergents.

Other hot papers in this issue:

Interlaboratory evaluation of trace element determination in workplace air filter samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
Kevin Ashley, Stanley A. Shulman, Michael J. Brisson and Alan M. Howe
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10695C

Occurrence and fate of androgens, estrogens, glucocorticoids and progestagens in two different types of municipal wastewater treatment plants
Shan Liu, Guang-Guo Ying, Jian-Liang Zhao, Li-Jun Zhou, Bin Yang, Zhi-Feng Chen and Hua-Jie Lai
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10783F

Enantioselective aquatic toxicity of current chiral pesticides
Quan Zhang, Cui Wang, Xiaofeng Zhang, Daqing Jin, Changjiang Huang and Meirong Zhao
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10687B

View the issue

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Meet our Editorial Board: Wunmi Sadik

Wunmi Sadik is Professor of Chemistry & Director, Center for Advanced Sensors & Environmental Systems, at State University of New York at Binghamton (SUNY-Binghamton). Her research areas include interfacial molecular recognition processes, sensors, and new measurement approaches and their application to solving problems in biological systems, energy and the environment. Professor Sadik was the Guest Editor for our Environmental Nanotechnology themed issue in 2011.

Her expertise covers the “Emerging Contaminants and Nanotechnology” area of our scope and you may also be interested in some of her recent articles:

Sensors as tools for quantitation, nanotoxicity and nanomonitoring assessment of engineered nanomaterials
O. A. Sadik, A. L. Zhou, S. Kikandi, N. Du, Q. Wang and K. Varner
DOI: 10.1039/B912860C

Foreword: JEM Spotlight: Environmental monitoring of airborne nanoparticles
Omowunmi (Wunmi) A. Sadik
DOI: 10.1039/B917248N

Environmental nanotechnology
Wunmi Sadik
Editorial From themed issue Environmental Nanotechnology

And her thoughts on the future of environmental nanotechnology? “The last decade has witnessed an explosion of interest in the science and technology of engineered nanomaterials. Research and development in the next decade will focus on the overall sustainability of nanotechnology including the need to develop standardized nanomaterials, characterization parameters, metrological tools and protocols for a better understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological and environmental systems.

View the profiles for the rest of the Editorial Board here.

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Hot article: Exposure of workers in aluminium smelters to beryllium

Data published in recent years has raised concern that the current occupational exposure limits (OELs) may not be low enough to protect workers from the toxic effects of exposure to beryllium.  Beryllium is present in aluminium ores, and therefore workers in the primary production process of aluminium may be at risk from exposure, even at low levels, to Be.

Yngvar Thomassen and coworkers have investigated the exposure of workers across 7 Norwegian aluminium smelters, collecting a total of 480 samples across two sampling campaigns.  Water soluble Be, Al, F and Na inhalable, thoracic and respirable aerosol fractions were determined, providing information on the amount and composition of the particulate matter which will be useful in better understanding the potential risks of occupational Be exposure.

Download the full article to read the authors discussion of  their results and potential implications – this hot article is currently free to access for 4 weeks:

Occupational exposure to beryllium in primary aluminium production
Nils Petter Skaugset, Dag G. Ellingsen, Kari Dahl, Ivar Martinsen, Lars Jordbekken, Per Arne Drabløs and Yngvar Thomassen
J. Environ. Monit., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10539F

This article is part of our forthcoming collection from the AIRMON 2011 conference, the 7th International Symposium on Modern Principles for Air Monitoring and Biomonitoring held on June 19–23 this year in Loen, Norway.  Check back soon for more hot articles in the collection.

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Issue 5 now online – themed issue on environmental nanotechnology

Our latest issue is a collection of articles on the theme of environmental nanotechnology, guest edited by JEM Editorial Board member, Wunmi Sadik.

On the outside front cover we have a HOT article from Rai Kookana on the sorption properties of fullerenes in soil – showing that they may form colloidal nanoparticles which affects the way they partition:

Sorption of nano-C60 clusters in soil: hydrophilic or hydrophobic interactions?
Mohsen Forouzangohar and Rai S. Kookana
J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 1190-1194
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00689K

The inside front cover highlights work from Paul Westerhoff on the removal of TiO2 nanomaterials from waste water:

Occurrence and removal of titanium at full scale wastewater treatment plants: implications for TiO2 nanomaterials
Paul Westerhoff, Guixue Song, Kiril Hristovski and Mehlika A. Kiser
J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 1195-1203
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10017C

Other HOT articles in this issue also include:

Effects of silver and cerium dioxide micro- and nano-sized particles on Daphnia magna
Birgit K. Gaiser, Anamika Biswas, Philipp Rosenkranz, Mark A. Jepson, Jamie R. Lead, Vicki Stone, Charles R. Tyler and Teresa F. Fernandes
J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 1227-1235
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10060B

Challenges for physical characterization of silver nanoparticles under pristine and environmentally relevant conditions
Robert I. MacCuspie, Kim Rogers, Manomita Patra, Zhiyong Suo, Andrew J. Allen, Matthew N. Martin and Vincent A. Hackley
J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 1212-1226
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10024F

View the issue online here

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HOT: sorption of nano-fullerene clusters in soil – hydrophillic or hydrophobic?

C60 molecules are well as hydrophobic compounds with a high KOC value.  But what happens when fullerene molecules are released into the environment?  

Mohsen Forouzangohar and Rai Kookana from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation have expanded on previous work that considered environmental C60 sorption on a purely molecular basis and assumed phase partitioning into soil organic matter is the main mechanism for the sorption of the hydrophobic C60 molecules.  They have shown that they may actually exist in the form of nano-C60 clusters in the environment – rather than as C60 molecules – and that hydrophobic interactions of this compound with soil organic matter are not likely to be the dominant mechanism governing its mobility in the environment.  Instead, net surface charge and hydrophilic interactions are expected to play a much more significant role, which could lead to much higher aqueous concentrations of the fullerenes in the environment than previously anticipated.

This interesting article is the cover article from our themed issue on Environmental Nanotechnology and it’s free to access for 6 weeks:

Sorption of nano-C60 clusters in soil: hydrophilic or hydrophobic interactions?
Mohsen Forouzangohar and Rai S. Kookana
J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 1190-1194
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00689K

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