Archive for the ‘Themed Collections’ Category

Halogenated (semi)volatile organic compounds (“X(S)VOCs”) Themed Issue

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on Halogenated (semi)volatile organic compounds (“X(S)VOCs”).

Guest Edited by Elizabeth Edwards (University of Toronto), Lucy Carpenter (University of York), Sarah Blossom (University Arkansas Medical Science) and ESPI Associate Editor Paul Tratnyek (Oregon Health & Science University) this issue will focus especially on chlorinated solvents (TCE), their metabolites, disinfection byproducts (THMs), etc. and their environmental occurrence, fate, effects, and remediation. A wide range of contributions are encouraged, from any compartment (air, soil, water, biota, etc.).

Submissions for this Themed Issue are due by 1st November 2019 – if you would like to submit to this Themed Issue, please contact the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editorial Office at espi-rsc@rsc.org to let us know.

 

Guest Editors (Left to Right): Elizabeth Edwards (University of Toronto), Lucy Carpenter (University of York), Sarah Blossom (University Arkansas Medical Science) and ESPI Associate Editor Paul Tratnyek (Oregon Health & Science University)

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Cryosphere Chemistry: Themed Issue in ESPI

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on Cryosphere Chemistry.  

Guest Edited by Rose Cory and Kerri Pratt (University of Michigan) this issue will showcase studies on chemical processes in sea ice, snow, glaciers, ice sheets, permafrost soils as well as studies on waters draining permafrost soils. A wide range of contributions are encouraged, from atmospheric chemistry (e.g. atmospheric aerosols and trace gases) to biogeochemistry (e.g. chemical weathering or organic matter chemistry). Laboratory, field or modeling studies from diverse environments (e.g. glaciers, high latitude and high altitude systems) are welcomed.

Submissions for this Themed Issue are due by 29th February 2020 – if you would like to submit to this Themed Issue, please contact the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editorial Office at espi-rsc@rsc.org to let us know.

 

Guest Editors (Left to Right): Rose Cory (University of Michigan) and Kerri Pratt (University of Michigan)

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Themed Issues in the Environmental Science journals

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Environmental Science journals Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Environmental Science: Nano and Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology are home to a diverse array of impactful research. Each journal publishes topic-based themed issues covering a variety of exciting areas in the field of envionmental science and engineering.
Here, we’ve collated our topic-based themed collections across the three journals for you to easily navigate to content most relevant to you, and also explore exciting new areas. We hope you enjoy reading the papers in these collections!

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PFAS: Themed Issue

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on PFAS.

Guest Edited by Lutz Ahrens (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences), Jonathan Benskin (Stockholm University), Ian Cousins (Stockholm University), Michelle Crimi (Clarkson University, USA) and Chris Higgins (Colorado School of Mines, USA), this issue will showcase studies which advance our understanding of the unique properties of PFASs and the risks these chemicals pose to the environment and human health, along with innovative approaches for chemical analysis, exposure assessment, modelling, and remediation of PFASs.

Examples of specific topics of interest for this Themed Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Sources, transport and fate of PFASs.
  • Bioaccumulation in wildlife and human exposure pathways, including PFAS temporal and spatial trends in humans and wildlife.
  • Emerging analytical methods for addressing the number and diversity of PFASs (e.g. total oxidation, suspect- and non-target screening, total organic fluorine, targeted approaches for emerging PFASs).
  • Ecotoxicology and human toxicology, including mechanisms of action.
  • Risk characterization and management.
  • Regulation (e.g. short-chain and alternative PFASs).

This issue will be part a pair of Themed Issues on PFASs organized in collaboration with ESPI’s sister journal Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology (ESWRT). The ESPI Themed Issue will focus on occurrence, fate, behaviour and effects of PFAS; whereas the ESWRT issue will focus on treatment, remediation, and management of PFASs. Find out more about the ESWRT issue here.

Submissions for this Themed Issue are due by 31st May – If you would like to submit to this Themed Issue, please contact the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editorial Office at espi-rsc@rsc.org to let us know.

Guest Editors: Left to Right – Lutz Ahrens (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden), Jonathan Benskin (Stockholm University), Ian Cousins (Stockholm University), Michelle Crimi (Clarkson University, USA) and Chris Higgins (Colorado School of Mines, USA)

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Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Collections

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) is the home for high-impact research that advances our understanding of environmental chemistry in natural matrices. Here, we’ve brought together all of our latest Article Collections, Themed Issues, and Editor’s Choice collections to enable you to easily navigate to content most relevant to you. We hope you enjoy reading the papers in these collections!

Ongoing Collections:

Themed Issues: 

 


Editors’ Choice Collections: 

 

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The environmental geochemistry and biology of hydraulic fracturing – Themed Issue

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on The environmental geochemistry and biology of hydraulic fracturing.

Guest Edited by Rob Jackson (Stanford University), Paula Mouser (University of New Hampshire), Desiree Plata (Yale University) and Avner Vengosh (Duke University), this Themed Issue aims to showcase original research, reviews and perspectives on the topic of environmental processes in hydraulic fracturing.

Horizontal Drilling with Hydraulic Fracturing (HDHF) has enabled rapid increases in oil and gas supplies, with these technologies now being applied for hydrocarbon development in shale basins across the globe. Concerns regarding the environmental impacts of HDHF technologies have spawned new research over the past 10 years.

In this special issue, we seek to report state-of-the-art knowledge across a broad range of chemical classes (e.g., methane, light, and noble gases, hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic compounds, inorganic chemicals, isotope tracers, radioactive elements, and heavy or rare earth metals) and disciplinary perspectives (e.g., environmental microbiology, geochemistry and biogeochemistry, fluid dynamics and hydrology, as well as public health and policy considerations) that integrate new research findings in environmental processes. The overarching goal of the collection will be to highlight the significant advancements made toward understanding the potential environmental impacts and vulnerabilities of HDHF technologies, assemble important novel contributions in the field, and identify current limitations or uncertainties in the research to motivate pointed future study.

The submission window for this Themed Issue closes on 27th July 2018. If you would like to submit to this Themed Issue,  please get in touch with the Editorial Office (espi-rsc@rsc.org) to register your interest.

Guest Editors: (from left to right) Rob Jackson (Stanford University), Paula Mouser (University of New Hampshire), Desiree Plata (Yale University) and Avner Vengosh (Duke University).

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Modeling in Environmental Chemistry: Themed Issue

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on Modeling in Environmental Chemistry

Edited by ESPI Associate Editor Matthew MacLeod (Stockholm University) and Guest Editors Todd Gouin (TG Environmental Research) and Tom McKone (University of California), this issue will showcase original research, perspectives, and reviews, relating to the use of modeling strategies to understand environmental systems. The scope of this issue is broad, and includes but is not limited to the following topics:

  • Global modeling of pollutants
  • Environmental fate modeling
  • Bioaccumulation modeling
  • Exposure assessment
  • Modeling in regulatory risk assessments
  • Toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic modelling

The submission window for this Themed Issue closes at the end of October 2017 – if you would like to submit to this Themed Issue, please contact the ESPI Editorial Office at espi-rsc@rsc.org to register your interest.

Guest Editors: Left to Right – Matthew MacLeod (Stockholm University) Todd Gouin (TG Environmental Research) and Tom McKone (University of California)

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Emerging Investigator Series: Cora Young

We are delighted to be able to bring you the first in interview for our Emerging Investigators Series in Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts

Cora completed her undergraduate and doctoral studies in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Toronto. Under the supervision of Prof. Scott Mabury, her Ph.D. research focused on the atmospheric chemistry of polyfluorinated compounds and their role as long-lived greenhouse gases and sources of persistent compounds to the environment. She went on to a postdoctoral position in Boulder, CO with Dr. Steven Brown at the University of Colorado and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). There, she developed novel, state-of-the-science instruments and used them to measure reactive atmospheric trace gases and determine their impact on the oxidative potential of the atmosphere. Cora joined the Department of Chemistry at Memorial University as an Assistant Professor in September 2012.

Read her Emerging Investigators article “A 14-year depositional ice record of perfluoroalkyl substances in the High Arctic“, which is featured in Issue 1 of the journal, and find out more in the interview below:

Are you within 10 years of receiving your PhD? Do you have an independent research career? Then you could be eligible for our Emerging Investigator Series! find out more at rsc.li/emerging-espi

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on improving the understanding of transport of perfluoroalkyl substances in the High Arctic. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

One of my first papers as a graduate student also involved looking at long-range transport of perfluoroalkyl substances to the Devon Ice Cap and was published ten years ago. As instrumentation improves and we develop better analytical methods, we are able to learn so much more about how pollutants impact our environment. We were able to look at four times as many chemical species as the original study, which greatly increases our understanding of the environmental fate of these compounds. We have also expanded our research network to include Northern community members and Arctic researchers with complementary expertise, which allows us to interpret and apply our results more effectively.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

We have some new environmental field and laboratory samples, including ice cores and biomass burning smoke samples, that I am excited to analyze using analytical techniques recently developed in my group.

In your opinion, what is the biggest impact to the environment presented by perfluoroalkyl substances?

Perfluorinated compounds have no natural degradation pathways in the environment. When we emit these chemicals to the environment, they will remain for the foreseeable future. We know that many perfluoroalkyl molecules bioaccumulate and could affect the health of humans or animals, which is cause for concern because there is no going back to an environment uncontaminated with these chemical species.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

I find field work simultaneously the most rewarding and the most difficult aspect of my research. Addressing environmental chemistry questions often means challenging collection of samples (such as those from ice caps) or the design and/or operation of complex instrumentation under harsh conditions.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

Canadian Chemistry Conference and Exhibition in Toronto, Ontario (June 2017) and Healthy Buildings Europe in Lublin, Poland (July 2017). I can also be found online at cjygroup.com and on Twitter @SVOCora.

How do you spend your spare time?

I don’t have too much of it right now! When I do have free time, I enjoy travelling, walking, hiking, reading, and yoga.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

It’s hard to imagine my life without science! If I wasn’t a scientist, I would want to do something that still involved science, like science communication or conservation management.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Seek out a supportive career network of mentors, collaborators, and colleagues. I have been fortunate to have wonderful mentors from my doctoral and post-doctoral work, and throughout the environmental chemistry community. My excellent collaborators from other academic institutions, Environment Canada (who were collaborators on this project), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration improve the quality and impact of my research and make it more fun to do!

To find out more about the series and submit an article, click here.

 

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What are your colleagues reading in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts?

The articles below are some of the most read Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts articles in 2016. You can view the full collection of our top 10 downloaded articles here.

 

Assessment of the long-term impacts of PM10 and PM2.5 particles from construction works on surrounding areas
Farhad Azarmi, Prashant Kumar, Daniel Marsh and Gary Fuller

 

The dilemma in prioritizing chemicals for environmental analysis: known versus unknown hazards
Sobek Anna, Bejgarn Sofia, Rudén Christina and Breitholtz Magnus

 

Role of snow and cold environment in the fate and effects of nanoparticles and select organic pollutants from gasoline engine exhaust
Yevgen Nazarenko, Uday Kurien, Oleg Nepotchatykh, Rodrigo B. Rangel-Alvarado and Parisa A. Ariya

 

Environmental transmission of diarrheal pathogens in low and middle income countries
Timothy R. Julian

 

Immobilized materials for removal of toxic metal ions from surface/groundwaters and aqueous waste streams
Iwona Zawierucha, Cezary Kozlowski and Grzegorz Malina

 

Keep up-to-date with the latest issues of Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts by joining our e-alerts.

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AIRMON 2014 Themed Collection

We are delighted to announce the publication of our latest themed issue dedicated to AIRMON 2014.

This themed collection gathers together reviews, primary research articles and communications from the 8th International Symposium on Modern Principles of Air Monitoring and Biomonitoring .

There is a growing need for air and biological monitoring within the preventive context of identifying health hazards at the workplace and in the environment and of keeping them under control. In recent years there has been continuous development in this field, and it is essential to promote knowledge of newly developed methods and strategies.
The symposium was an opportunity for an interchange of ideas among researchers, specialists in exposure assessment strategies and analytical air sampling methodologies, policy makers and practitioners in occupational health and environmental science. We are honoured to be the official Publisher for papers from AIRMON 2014 in Marseilles, France.


Editorial


Introduction to papers published from the AIRMON symposium, Marseille, France, 15–19 June 2014
Peter Görner
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2015, 17, 259-260
DOI: 10.1039/C5EM90004B


Papers


Development and field testing of a miniaturized sampling system for simultaneous sampling of vapours and droplets
Dietmar Breuer, George C. Dragan, Claudia Friedrich, Carsten Möhlmann and Ralf Zimmermann
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts
, 2015, 17, 278-287
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00602J


Influence of combined dust reducing carpet and compact air filtration unit on the indoor air quality of a classroom
Paul T. J. Scheepers, Jeroen J. de Hartog, Judith Reijnaerts, Gwendolyn Beckmann, Rob Anzion, Katrien Poels and Lode Godderis
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2015, 17, 316-325
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00506F


A laboratory study of the performance of the handheld diffusion size classifier (DiSCmini) for various aerosols in the 15–400 nm range
S. Bau, B. Zimmermann, R. Payet and O. Witschger
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2015, 17, 261-269
DOI
: 10.1039/C4EM00491D


An evaluation of the “GGP” personal samplers under semi-volatile aerosols: sampling losses and their implication on occupational risk assessment
George C. Dragan, Dietmar Breuer, Morten Blaskowitz, Erwin Karg, Jürgen Schnelle-Kreis, Jose M. Arteaga-Salas, Hermann Nordsieck and Ralf Zimmermann
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts
, 2015, 17, 270-277
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00468J


Measurement of organic and elemental carbon in downtown Rome and background area: physical behavior and chemical speciation
Pasquale Avino, Maurizio Manigrasso, Alberto Rosada and Alessandro Dodaro
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts
, 2015, 17, 300-315
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00471J


Evaluation of bioaerosol exposures during hospital bronchoscopy examinations
Jacques Lavoie, Geneviève Marchand, Yves Cloutier, Stéphane Hallé, Sylvie Nadeau, Caroline Duchaine and Gilbert Pichette
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2015, 17, 288-299
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00359D


We hope you enjoy reading this collection as much as we did!

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