Archive for the ‘Prizes’ Category

Canadian Ecotoxicity Workshop – Poster Prize Winner!

We are delighted to announce the winner of the Canadian Ecotoxicity Workshop that took place in Vancouver from 30th September – 3rd October 2018. The best poster was awarded to Jordana Van Geest of Golder Associates with her poster title: “A sulfite and total dissolved solids (TDS) toxicity interaction study for coal mine influenced waters in British Columbia.” The award was presented by Curtis Eickhoff at the annual general meeting luncheon that took place on Wednesday 3rd October.

On behalf of the Royal Society of Chemistry, we would like to congratulate Jordana on this outstanding achievement.

Poster prize winner at Canadian Ecotoxicity Workshop 2018: Jordana Van Geest

 

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27th Symposium on Environmental Chemistry Prize Winners!

The 27th Symposium on Environmental Chemistry was held in Naha, Japan between 22-25 May 2018. The conference was chaired by Professor Kiwao Kadokami and was comprised of a number of plenary lectures, talks and posters on topics covering the breadth of environmental chemistry.

On behalf of the Environmental Science Journals, we would like to congratulate the following prize winners for contributing their outstanding posters.

Left to Right: Hiromitsu Urakami (RSC) , Sumika Ono (Ehime University), Alto Sonoda (Kagoshima University), Collins Nimako (Hokkaido University), Mai Shindo (Shizuoka University) and Professor Kiwao Kadokami (Committee Chair)

Environmental Science: Nano winner: 

Alto Sonoda (Kagoshima University)
Poster title: ‘Device for Measuring Dermal Exposure Rate of Flame Retardants via Direct Contact with Products.’

Environmental Science: Water Research and Technology winner: 

Sumika Ono (Ehime University)
Poster title:‘Development of highly sensitive analytical method for thyroid hormones in the brain using LC-MS/MS’

Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts 

Collins Nimako (Hokkaido University)
Poster title: ‘Evaluation of Neonicotinoid Insecticide exposure in the humans in Kumasi, Ghana’

Mai Shindo (Shizuoka University)
Poster title: ‘Analysis and leaching of trace elements in Sakurajima ash fall samples’

Congratulations once again to all awardees! 

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Congratulations to the winner of NOSA Early Career Scientist Aerosologist Award 2018

We are delighted to announce the winner of the NOSA Early Career Scientist Aerosologist Award 2018. Jana Johansson (pictured below) from Stockholm University has been awarded the prize for the best Ph.D. thesis of 2017 by the Nordic Society for Aerosol Research (NOSA).

“I have a MSc in Chemistry and a PhD in Applied Environmental Science, both from Stockholm University. I defended my thesis in June of 2017. Its title is ‘Sources, transport and fate of perfluoroalkyl acids in the atmosphere’. Perfluoroalkyl acids are persistent anthropogenic chemicals present in humans, biota and in the abiotic environment globally. Several potential sources have been proposed to explain the presence of perfluoroalkyl alkyl acids in the atmosphere. My research is focused on increasing our understanding of their relative importance on the global scale. One of the main findings presented in my thesis is that perfluoroalkyl acids are strongly enriched in sea spray aerosol. Consequently, the global oceans may act as an important source of perfluoroalkyl acids to the atmosphere. As a post doc, I am now setting up studies to test this hypothesis as well as studies aimed at determining the importance of sea spray as a vector for ocean-to-atmosphere transport of other anthropogenic and biogenic substances.”

“During my time as a PhD student I noticed that there is quite a big divide between contaminant scientists and aerosol scientists. As a result, our view of the atmospheric transport of pollutants is sometimes overly simplistic. To address some of the questions which have remained unanswered in my field during the last decade, I collaborated with scientists from the atmospheric aerosol unit of the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (Stockholm University). Receiving recognition from the aerosol community has encouraged me to continue this work as part of my post doc”, says Jana Johansson.

Congratulations to Jana on this outstanding achievement. We wish her all the best with her future research on sea spray aerosols.

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