Archive for the ‘Board News’ Category

Introducing Editorial Board Member Young-Shin Jun

In the second post of our Introducing series, we’re very pleased to introduce Editorial Board member Young-Shin Jun to the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts blog readers!

Young-Shin Jun is an Associate Professor of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering at Washington University (St. Louis, USA), where she leads the Environmental NanoChemistry Laboratory. She is a 2011 U. S. National Science Foundation CAREER award recipient. Her research focuses on interfacial reactions in complex aqueous systems. Her research group’s projects include elucidating physicochemical reaction mechanisms occurring during water reuse through aquifer storage, treatment, and recovery to secure underground sources for drinking water; improving our understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants and nanoparticles; and providing more environmentally sustainable CO2 sequestration strategies. Prior to her position at Washington University, she conducted postdoctoral research in Nanogeoscience at the University of California at Berkeley/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA. She holds an S.M. and Ph.D. in Environmental Chemistry from Harvard University (Cambridge, USA). She received her B.S. and M.S. in Environmental Science and Engineering at Ewha Womans University (Seoul, Korea).

RESEARCH VISION: “In the face of unprecedented demands for energy and clean water, we simply must find ways to secure sustainable supplies of both.  At the same time, we must respect and restore the environment and reduce our emission of greenhouse gases. Maintaining a sustainable energy-water nexus is a grand environmental challenge, one which environmental scientists and engineers are uniquely positioned to undertake.  At complex environmental interfaces, various combinations of reactions can often occur simultaneously. A full understanding of dynamic interfaces at the molecular scale is essential in predicting the geochemical cycling of elements and the fate and transport of contaminants. This knowledge, in turn, will help us to develop better remediation methods for polluted sites, to design sustainable carbon sequestration and utilization, and to enhance our understanding of biomineralization and our development of environmentally benign bio-inspired materials. To advance our understanding of environmental interfacial reactions, my research group, the Environmental NanoChemistry Laboratory, in the Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering at Washington University, has been providing in situ, real-time quantitative and qualitative information from unique experimental approaches. The dynamic environmental systems studied include nanoparticles’ formation and their transformation in natural and engineered aqueous systems, managed aquifer recharge, and energy-related subsurface operations. By providing crucial information for upscaling that is presently not available, we hope this research can benefit the larger scale engineering processes needed to make major impacts.”
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Introducing Editorial Board member Nora Savage

Beginning a small series of blog posts introducing the newest Editorial Board members of Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, in this week’s post we are pleased to introduce Nora Savage and her research vision:

Nora Savage

Nora obtained her bachelors degree in Chemical Engineering in 1992 from Prairie View A&M University, in Prairie View, Texas.  She received two Masters Degrees (in Environmental Engineering and Environmental Science) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, in Madison, Wisconsin in1995, and a doctoral degree in Environmental Science from the same institution in 2000. Her current position is that of environmental engineer at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Washington, DC in the Office of Research and Development (ORD).  Her focus areas include nanotechnology, pollution prevention, and sustainable life cycle approaches for emerging technologies. 

Nora is one of the Agency representatives on the Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology (NSET) subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council that implements and coordinates activities and strategies of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) and has served in this role since 2001.  Recently she served as Co-Chair of the NNI’s Strategic Plan Task Force, the inter-agency work group that developed the 2011 NNI Strategic Plan. Nora has authored and co-authored numerous articles on nanotechnology in leading journals, including the Journal of Nanoparticle Research and Toxicological Sciences.  She was lead editor for the book “Nanotechnology for Water Applications” and has contributed chapters to several other books, including the Oxford Handbook of Nanoscience and Technology, vol. III.

Nora is currently the Chair of the 2013 Environmental Nanotechnology Gordon research Conference.

NORA’S RESEARCH VISION: “Currently the approaches for addressing human health and ecological protection involve assessing, controlling/mitigating exposure to individual contaminants based upon experimental or observed toxicity. Toxicity (hazard) and exposure data are accumulated and risks are assessed based upon single compounds or very simple mixtures. Many scientists and policy makers have called for better approaches for assessing and managing risks to existing and emerging compounds.
The development of “green” compounds is challenged by the creation of engineered nanomaterials with identical chemical formulas yet which exhibit different properties depending upon shape, size, and surface characteristics. As these novel compounds move through and between both environmental and biological media and undergo transformations, attendant properties are often altered as well. Consequently, it is not sufficient to amass toxicity data of the original or starting material if the goal is the protection of public and environmental health. The compound must be characterized throughout all life cycle stages. Subsequently toxicity testing upon the transformed compound or material would then provide more accurate information.
Multi-disciplinary research is required to achieve characterization of compounds through all life cycle stages. For example, engineers can explore processes and offer material mass balances, material scientist can provide detailed data on structure, morphology and other material properties, biologists and ecologists can provide information concerning movement through biological and ecological media, and social scientists can provide critical information on compound or product usages and behavioral patterns controlling exposure. Such research would also derive immense benefits from multi-cultural research teams. As challenges faced increase in complexity, solutions are achieved faster when analyzed by people of diverse backgrounds and experiences and with diverse approaches and perspectives,
By exploiting the novel properties of engineered nanomaterials with multi-disciplinary, international teams examining the resultant transformations as these compounds move through the ecosystem, improved data characterizing the environment will result. As scientific knowledge improves about how altered states of engineered nanomaterials result in altered properties, better understanding of complex mixtures will result. This will enable more accurate correlations of causal links among observed adverse biological and ecological effects, exposure, behavior, and compound concentrations. This knowledge will help usher in the development of true “green” compounds. The ultimate goal would be improved environmental assessments which can then pave the way towards more holistic public and environmental health protection.”
 

 

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Dioxin 2012 Symposium

Cairns convention centre This year’s International Symposium on Halogenated Persistent Organic Pollutants will be held in Cairns, Australia, at the Cairns Convention Centre. The conference runs from 26-31 August 2012.

Each year, the International Dioxin Symposium provides an excellent opportunity for the presentation and discussion of the most current scientific research on POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants) across all disciplines, including analytical and environmental chemistry, molecular biology, human health, risk assessment and risk management.

This year’s Symposium Chairs are Jochen Mueller and Caroline Gaus, from the National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox) at the University of Queensland.

Cairns at nightA wide range of core topics on analytical and environmental chemistry, environmental and human toxicology, epidemiology, exposure assessment, as well as regulation, risk assessment and management will be covered. Dioxin 2012 will also feature discussion on important global and current regional issues, focusing on topics such as emerging contaminants, marine and eco-toxicology, and chemical regulation and policy. For more information on this exciting conference and details of how to register, please see the website.

In attendance at the conference will be Professor Beate Escher, Editorial Board Member and Associate Editor for the Journal of Environmental Monitoring. I’m sure she’d be delighted to meet you.

Important dates for your diaries:

Abstract submission opens – 7 March 2012
Registration – Now open
Abstract submission deadline – 14 May 2012
Notifications to submitters – 15 June 2012
Early bird registration closes – 22 June 2012

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Meet the Editorial Board: Shinsuke Tanabe

Ps. This is our favourite photo!

Dr Shinsuke Tanabe is a Professor at the Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Japan and is the Program Leader of the Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) Program. He established the Environmental Specimen Bank at Ehime University and his lab are currently involved in global monitoring of trace and radioactive elements, classic and novel persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), especially in developing countries in Asia and Africa. They are also involved in measuring the in situ, in vivo and in ovo toxic implications of persistent chemicals like dioxins and related chemicals (DRCs) on wildlife and humans.

As you can see, his research covers the “Source, Transport and Fate” and “Exposure and Impacts” areas of our scope:

Silver speciation in liver of marine mammals by synchrotron X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies
Emiko Nakazawa, Tokutaka Ikemoto, Akiko Hokura, Yasuko Terada, Takashi Kunito, Takahito Yamamoto, Tadasu K. Yamada, Fernando C. W. Rosas, Gilberto Fillmann, Shinsuke Tanabe and Izumi Nakai
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10115C

Spatial and temporal evolution of imposex in dogwhelk Nucella lapillus (L.) populations from North Wales, UK
Isabel Benta Oliveira, Christopher Allan Richardson, Ana Catarina Sousa, Shin Takahashi, Shinsuke Tanabe and Carlos Miguez Barroso
DOI: 10.1039/B906766C

Brominated flame retardants in the environment of Asia-Pacific: an overview of spatial and temporal trends
Shinsuke Tanabe, Karri Ramu, Tomohiko Isobe and Shin Takahashi
DOI: 10.1039/B709928B

Environmental Specimen Bank in Ehime University (es-BANK), Japan for global monitoring
Shinsuke Tanabe
DOI: 10.1039/B602677J

We asked him what he thinks will be future environmental issues:
“Emerging POPs are exclusively man-made but extremely toxic to humans, present in all our organs and tissues. The effect of POPs on humans is well known but their toxic implications will become a hot cake for scientists to deal with in the future. Also, radioactivity is actively making human life bright at present but may make it gloomy in future if emissions from atomic power plants are not controlled. There will be a need for continuous assessment of pollution from the thousands of such plants in the future.”

View the profiles for the rest of the Editorial Board here.

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Meet our Editorial Board: Wunmi Sadik

Wunmi Sadik is Professor of Chemistry & Director, Center for Advanced Sensors & Environmental Systems, at State University of New York at Binghamton (SUNY-Binghamton). Her research areas include interfacial molecular recognition processes, sensors, and new measurement approaches and their application to solving problems in biological systems, energy and the environment. Professor Sadik was the Guest Editor for our Environmental Nanotechnology themed issue in 2011.

Her expertise covers the “Emerging Contaminants and Nanotechnology” area of our scope and you may also be interested in some of her recent articles:

Sensors as tools for quantitation, nanotoxicity and nanomonitoring assessment of engineered nanomaterials
O. A. Sadik, A. L. Zhou, S. Kikandi, N. Du, Q. Wang and K. Varner
DOI: 10.1039/B912860C

Foreword: JEM Spotlight: Environmental monitoring of airborne nanoparticles
Omowunmi (Wunmi) A. Sadik
DOI: 10.1039/B917248N

Environmental nanotechnology
Wunmi Sadik
Editorial From themed issue Environmental Nanotechnology

And her thoughts on the future of environmental nanotechnology? “The last decade has witnessed an explosion of interest in the science and technology of engineered nanomaterials. Research and development in the next decade will focus on the overall sustainability of nanotechnology including the need to develop standardized nanomaterials, characterization parameters, metrological tools and protocols for a better understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological and environmental systems.

View the profiles for the rest of the Editorial Board here.

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Meet our Editorial Board: Kristopher McNeill

Professor Kristopher McNeill is a professor at ETH Zurich and chairs the Environmental Chemistry group where his research is focussed on environmental organic chemistry, with a particular emphasis on developing a molecular-level understanding of environmentally important processes.  His group have current projects on the fate of emerging contaminants, natural organic matter photochemistry, the environmental chemistry of proteins, and metal-mediated defluorination reactions.

His research covers the “Source, Transport and Fate” area of our scope, and his latest article in the journal is on developing a probe to investigate the production and fate of the OH. radical in sunlit waters:

Terephthalate as a probe for photochemically generated hydroxyl radical
Sarah E. Page, William A. Arnold and Kristopher McNeill
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00160K

We asked him what he thought would be a challenge for environmental chemists in the coming years:
The challenge that environmental organic chemists face going into the future is that problems are moving out of our comfort zone of small, charge-neutral, hydrophobic molecules to large, polyfunctional, and/or less well-defined species. The rule book of how one approaches the environmental chemistry of things like biomacromolecules or carbon nanomaterials still needs to be written.”

View the profiles for the rest of the Editorial Board here.

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Meet our Editorial Board: Liang-Hong Guo

Professor Liang-Hong Guo is a principal investigator and group leader at the Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. His current research interests include biosensors and bioassays for quantitative determination of environmental chemicals and chemical toxicity testing, interactions of environmental chemicals with biological molecules and their toxicological implications, and nanomaterials for water purification.

Professor Guo’s expertise covers the “Novel Analytical Tools and Measurement Technologies” area of our scope, and he of course thinks this will be an important development area for the future, “Newly developed research tools in the life science fields will gain popularity in the study of environmental toxicology. Nanotechnology-based devices for large-scale water purification will also be demonstrated“.

Professor Guo will also be providing regular updates on the latest environmental news from China, read his first two columns here:

News from China
Liang-Hong Guo
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM90044G

News from China
Liang-Hong Guo
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM90029C

View the profiles for the rest of the Editorial Board here.

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Meet our Editorial Board: Beate Escher

Professor Beate Escher is Deputy Director of the National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox) in Brisbane, Australia, where she researches mode-of-action based environmental risk assessment, including methods for initial hazard screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and pesticides with an emphasis on mixtures, and especially effect assessment of transformation products and disinfection by-products. One of her goals is to close the gap between exposure and effect assessment through approaches linking bioavailability to internal exposure and effects via understanding and modelling of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic processes.

Her research expertise covers “Exposure and Impacts” and “Novel Analytical Tools and Measurement Technologies” areas of our scope.  Take a look at some of her recent research in these areas:

Recovery of a freshwater wetland from chemical contamination after an oil spill
Haipu Bi, David Rissik, Miroslava Macova, Laurence Hearn, Jochen F. Mueller and Beate Escher
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00406E

Advantages of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic modelling in aquatic ecotoxicology and risk assessment
Roman Ashauer and Beate I. Escher
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00234H

JEM Spotlight: Monitoring the treatment efficiency of a full scale ozonation on a sewage treatment plant with a mode-of-action based test battery
Beate I. Escher, Nadine Bramaz and Christoph Ort
DOI: 10.1039/B907093A

We asked her what areas of environmental science she thought would gain significance in the next few years:
“Areas of growing significance will be the disinfection by-products and transformation products of organic micropollutants.”

View the profiles for the rest of the Editorial Board here.

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Meet our Editorial Board: Jon Ayres

Jon Ayres is Professor of Environmental & Respiratory Medicine at the University of Birmingham and a respiratory physician.  He has advised the Government and a variety of learned societies on air pollution and health issues related to the environment for a number of years.  His clinical interests are focussed on occupational and environmental lung disease and his research is directed towards understanding the health effects of indoor and outdoor air pollution and the health risks of nanomaterial exposure.

“The only way we can understand the true risks from exposure to environmental hazards is to construct robust exposure–response functions for a range of exposure–outcome pairings. This is somewhat easier for outcomes which follow closely on exposures but much harder for those where the relevant exposures precede outcomes by long periods of time. We therefore have to define better ways of determining those exposures in objective rather than subjective ways – a huge challenge!”

– Jon Ayres

Professor Ayres’ expertise covers the “Exposure and Impacts” category of the scope of JEM. For Board members covering other areas of our scope check out the profile article of our Editorial Board.

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Meet our new Editorial Board Chair: Frank Wania

Frank Wania is Professor of Environmental Chemistry at the University of Toronto, where his research is focussed on the environmental fate and transport of organic contaminants, with a view to gaining a mechanistic understanding of contaminant enrichment processes through a combination of field work, laboratory experimentation and model simulations. Current projects he is working on deal with the development and application of passive air sampling techniques for semi-volatile organic contaminants, the interaction of contaminant fate and climate, the identification of new environmental contaminants by theoretical means, and the quantification of the role of snow in the environmental fate of pollutants.

Professor Wania’s expertise covers the following categories of the scope of JEM: “Source, Transport and Fate” and “Novel Analytical Tools and Measurement Technologies”, with a growing interest in aspects of “Exposure and Impacts”.

For some examples of his latest research in these areas why not try these hot papers:

Mercury fate in ageing and melting snow: Development and testing of a controlled laboratory system
Erin Mann, Torsten Meyer, Carl P. J. Mitchell and Frank Wania
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10297D

Visualising the equilibrium distribution and mobility of organic contaminants in soil using the chemical partitioning space
Fiona Wong and Frank Wania
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10109A

Global climate change and contaminants—an overview of opportunities and priorities for modelling the potential implications for long-term human exposure to organic compounds in the Arctic
James M. Armitage, Cristina L. Quinn and Frank Wania
DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10131E

We asked Professor Wania what he thinks the future holds for environmental chemistry:
I expect some of the most interesting work to arise from collaborative projects, e.g. when modellers and field researchers join forces to design clever field experiments, or when environmental scientists work across the boundaries that have developed over the years, e.g. between the atmospheric science community and the environmental organic chemists.”

You can also read his Editorial for his ambitions for the journal as “the periodical of choice for cutting-edge research on environmental processes and impacts here or view the profiles for the rest of the Editorial Board here.

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