Cross-journal web collection featuring work presented at IAP2018

 

Selected articles based on presentations made at the IAP2018 Conference will be published in three journals of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Environmental Science series, i.e., Environmental Science: Processes & ImpactsEnvironmental Science: Water Research & Technology and Environmental Science: Nano. Authors will be encouraged to submit to the journal that is most appropriate for their paper based on its scope. All articles will be collated into a cross-journal web collection after publication. Information on how to apply to publish in a given journal, will be available during the conference.

 

The deadline for submission of all manuscripts is 31st October, 2018. 

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Environmental Science journals offer comprehensive coverage of the latest high quality research in environmental science & engineering:

  • Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) – rsc.li/espi
    Led by Editor-in-Chief Kris McNeill (ETH Zurich) ESPI publishes work which advances our understanding of environmental chemistry in natural matrices – Submit to ESPI
  • Environmental Science: Nano – rsc.li/es-nano 
    Led by Editor-in-Chief Professor Peter Vikesland (Virginia Tech) Environmental Science: Nano publishes research on nanomaterial applications and interactions with environmental & biological systems – Submit to ESNano
  • Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology – rsc.li/es-water
    Led by Editor-in-Chief David Cwiertny (University of Iowa) Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology publishes water research relevant to engineered systems and the built environment – Submit to ESWRT

Our team of expert Associate Editors are committed to providing you with efficient and attentive service throughout the publication process; our average time to first decision is under 40 days*

The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world’s leading chemistry community, advancing excellence in the chemical sciences. As a not-for-profit organisation we are committed to supporting the global scientific community; providing continual support for authors and researchers and investing in future generations of scientists.
Learn more about the portfolio at rsc.li/envsci

Please note that all submissions will be subject to initial assessment by the Editors and subsequent peer review, as per the usual standards of the journals. 

*Average time from receipt to first decision in 2017

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The Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Contaminated Environments 2018

The Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Contaminated Environments

6th June, Burlington House, London

Image result for the-geochemistry-and-mineralogy-of-contaminated-environments

 

The aim of this meeting is to explore how understanding the geochemistry and mineralogy of the natural environment can help us to predict the fate and behaviour of contaminants, and mitigate their impacts.

The deadline for standard registration closes on 18th May. Please register using the RSC booking portal and find further information about the meeting including confirmed speakers and contact details on our Conference and Events database.

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Congratulations to the winner of NOSA Early Career Scientist Aerosologist Award 2018

We are delighted to announce the winner of the NOSA Early Career Scientist Aerosologist Award 2018. Jana Johansson (pictured below) from Stockholm University has been awarded the prize for the best Ph.D. thesis of 2017 by the Nordic Society for Aerosol Research (NOSA).

“I have a MSc in Chemistry and a PhD in Applied Environmental Science, both from Stockholm University. I defended my thesis in June of 2017. Its title is ‘Sources, transport and fate of perfluoroalkyl acids in the atmosphere’. Perfluoroalkyl acids are persistent anthropogenic chemicals present in humans, biota and in the abiotic environment globally. Several potential sources have been proposed to explain the presence of perfluoroalkyl alkyl acids in the atmosphere. My research is focused on increasing our understanding of their relative importance on the global scale. One of the main findings presented in my thesis is that perfluoroalkyl acids are strongly enriched in sea spray aerosol. Consequently, the global oceans may act as an important source of perfluoroalkyl acids to the atmosphere. As a post doc, I am now setting up studies to test this hypothesis as well as studies aimed at determining the importance of sea spray as a vector for ocean-to-atmosphere transport of other anthropogenic and biogenic substances.”

“During my time as a PhD student I noticed that there is quite a big divide between contaminant scientists and aerosol scientists. As a result, our view of the atmospheric transport of pollutants is sometimes overly simplistic. To address some of the questions which have remained unanswered in my field during the last decade, I collaborated with scientists from the atmospheric aerosol unit of the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (Stockholm University). Receiving recognition from the aerosol community has encouraged me to continue this work as part of my post doc”, says Jana Johansson.

Congratulations to Jana on this outstanding achievement. We wish her all the best with her future research on sea spray aerosols.

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Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography Summer Meeting (ASLO) 2018

Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography Summer Meeting (ASLO) 2018 takes place in Victoria, BC, Canada from 10-15th June 2018.

This meeting will encourage you to bring your knowledge, curiosity, and creativity to connect with each other and to share your passion for water!

 

The full scientific program will be posted in April 2018 so keep checking the conference website here for details. To register for the conference, click here.

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International Conference on Computational Chemistry and Toxicology in Environmental Science 2018

The International Conference on Computational Chemistry and Toxicology in Environmental Science 2018 will be held at the National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan from 4th May 2018 to 6th May, 2018.

 

Topics of interest include Environmental multimedia model, Environmental Computational Chemistry and Computational Toxicology. For further details including other topics of interest, invited speakers, plenary lectures and information on the organising committee, see the conference website.

Organizer: National Chung Hsing University

Implementer: Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University

Contact personProfessor Chia Ming Chang

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Outstanding Reviewers for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts in 2017

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) in 2017, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Matthew Baker, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Dr Antonio Di Guardo, University of Insubria

Dr Todd Gouin, TG Environmental Research

Dr Elisabeth Janssen, Eawag

Dr Douglas Latch, Seattle University

Dr Zhe Li, Stockholm University

Professor Michael McLachlan, Stockholm University

Dr  Katherine Peter, University of Washington Tacoma

Dr Ruiyang Xiao, Central South University

Dr Xianming Zhang, University of Toronto

We would also like to thank the ESPI board and the Environmental Chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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11th Annual Conference on Persistent Organic Pollutants

11th Annual Conference on Persistent Organic Pollutants will be held in Birmingham, UK between 25th-26th April 2018

There will be plenary talks given by leading international figures at the start of the programme for each morning and afternoon.  These will be supported by a full programme of oral and poster presentations.  The conference is aimed at researchers, consultants and policy-makers with interests in persistent organic pollutants.

Dates of Event
25th April 2018 – 26th April 2018
Last Booking Date for this Event
5th April 2018

Registration fees: 

£192.50 (late registration full delegate) without overnight accommodation.

£55 (Student/NGO delegate) without overnight accommodation on 25 April.

For more information, see the conference website.

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COGER 2018, 37th Annual Open Meeting

COGER 2018 will be held at the Manchester Conference Centre, UK between 11th-13th April, 2018.

The meeting will start at midday on Wednesday 11th April and finish at midday on Friday 13th April 2018. The main purpose of the COGER Open Meeting is an informal discussion of active and proposed research concerning all aspects of environmental radioactivity. The informal nature of the meeting makes it particularly attractive to students or first time presenters. Presentations that might help the COGER community engage with the ‘impact’ agenda are particularly welcome, especially from non-academic stakeholders.

Confirmed speakers include Prof Richard Wakeford at The University of Manchester, UK. 

LOCATION & DATES 

Manchester Conference Centre, UK 11th-13th April 2018

DEADLINES:

 Standard Registration – 19th March

Abstracts (Oral and and Poster) – 19th March

To more information, please see the conference website or the RSC Events Database to download the registration form and relevant templates.

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Emerging Investigator Series – Raoul-Marie Couture

We are delighted to introduce our latest Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts Emerging Investigator, Raoul-Marie Couture!

Raoul-Marie Couture is an aquatic geochemist studying coupled elementary cycles in lakes, waterlogged soils and freshwater sediment, with a focus on such systems within the boreal zone. He holds a BSc in Chemistry (2004) from Laval University and a PhD in Water Sciences (2010) from the University of Quebec, Canada. After his graduate studies he held a post-doctoral fellowship at the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Research Assistant Professor position in the Ecohydrology Group at the University of Waterloo. From 2013 to 2018, he was researcher, then head of the section for Catchment Processes at the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) in Oslo, Norway. Form March 1st 2018 onward he is Associate Professor in the Chemistry department at Laval University. His research aims to understand how the biogeochemical cycling of key elements responds to human activities and climatic factors, with the overarching goal of improving water quality. To acheve his research goals, he combines field work, instrumental analysis and process-oriented computer modelling. His publications have touched on the modelling of biogeochemical processes controlling seasonal anoxia and algae blooms in lakes, the speciation and fate of contaminant metals and metalloids, and the modelling of sediment-water interactions during early diagenesis. He lives in Quebec city with his spouse and two daughters.

Read his Emerging Investigators series article: “Geochemistry of trace elements associated with Fe and Mn nodules in the sediment of limed boreal lakes and find out more about him in the interview below:

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on the geochemistry of trace elements in the sediment of limed boreal lakes. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

This article reflects my continuous interest in sediment redox processes and in metal and metalloid diagenesis. Since my first article in 2008, my research has evolved to consider multiple lake systems at once, and how they respond to multiple pressures such as atmospheric deposition, long-term changes in land use and climate, and to geoengineering measures.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

I am just about to start a new position as a professor in the chemistry department at Laval University. I am looking forward to building a research group in aquatic geochemistry to work the impact of current environmental changes on water quality. I am particularly excited about the opportunity to work on a wide range of water quality issues in various settings, from populated agricultural catchments to boreal and arctic landscapes.

In your opinion, what is the biggest environmental impact posed by the release of trace elements into the water column?

The release of trace elements – especially those that are potentially toxic – to the water column can have a significant environmental impact. In the natural environment, it is a threat to aquatic ecosystems, with often severe impact on the food web from phytoplankton to fish. In drinking water reservoirs, it is a direct threat to water quality and to human health.  Understanding on how trace elements can remain sequestered in the sediment contributes to reducing their environmental impacts.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

The most challenging aspect of my research is the combination of field work, laboratory experiments and computer-based modelling. Understanding the coupled cycling of major and trace elements in the aquatic environment requires balancing project resources along these three axes.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I can be found at the upcoming workshop on Restoration of Eutrophic Lakes in Lahti, Finland, June 4-5 2018 (https://lahtilakes2018.fi/) and at the upcoming Goldschmidt 2018 conference in Boston, USA, Aug. 17-18, 2018.

How do you spend your spare time?

I enjoy spending time with my spouse and two young daughters. These days I am also learning the ins and outs of improving the old house that we recently bought in Quebec City.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Choosing between art and natural sciences was a difficult decision when the time came to select an undergraduate program – my other choice would have been architecture.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

I have experienced that the demands on the time of young researchers is hard to balance, especially with the needs of a young family. Learning early to manage our time efficiently strikes me as an important skill.  For instance, knowing in advance the criteria for advancement has helped me to seize the right opportunities.

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The environmental geochemistry and biology of hydraulic fracturing – Themed Issue

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) seeks your high-impact research for our upcoming Themed Issue on The environmental geochemistry and biology of hydraulic fracturing.

Guest Edited by Rob Jackson (Stanford University), Paula Mouser (University of New Hampshire), Desiree Plata (Yale University) and Avner Vengosh (Duke University), this Themed Issue aims to showcase original reasearch, reviews and perspectives on the topic of environmental processes in hydraulic fracturing.

Horizontal Drilling with Hydraulic Fracturing (HDHF) has enabled rapid increases in oil and gas supplies, with these technologies now being applied for hydrocarbon development in shale basins across the globe. Concerns regarding the environmental impacts of HDHF technologies have spawned new research over the past 10 years.

In this special issue, we seek to report state-of-the-art knowledge across a broad range of chemical classes (e.g., methane, light, and noble gases, hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic compounds, inorganic chemicals, isotope tracers, radioactive elements, and heavy or rare earth metals) and disciplinary perspectives (e.g., environmental microbiology, geochemistry and biogeochemistry, fluid dynamics and hydrology, as well as public health and policy considerations) that integrate new research findings in environmental processes. The overarching goal of the collection will be to highlight the significant advancements made toward understanding the potential environmental impacts and vulnerabilities of HDHF technologies, assemble important novel contributions in the field, and identify current limitations or uncertainties in the research to motivate pointed future study.

The submission window for this Themed Issue closes on 27th July 2018. If you would like to submit to this Themed Issue,  please get in touch with the Editorial Office (espi-rsc@rsc.org) to register your interest.

Guest Editors: (from left to right) Rob Jackson (Stanford University), Paula Mouser (University of New Hampshire), Desiree Plata (Yale University) and Avner Vengosh (Duke University).

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