Latest hot articles in JEM on urban stormwater sampling and characterising titanium dioxide nanoparticles

C2EM10999A graphical abstractWilliam Selbig, Amanda Cox and Roger Bannerman discuss the development of a new water sample collection system, to improve representation of solids entrained in urban stormwater by integrating water-quality samples from the entire water column, rather than a single, fixed point. They report that development of this new depth-integrated sample arm (DISA) was able to mitigate stratification bias resulting in a more accurate representation of stormwater-borne solids than traditional fixed-point sample collection methods.

Verification of a depth-integrated sample arm as a means to reduce solids stratification bias in urban stormwater sampling
William R. Selbig, Amanda Cox and Roger T. Bannerman
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM10999A

C2EM10809G graphical abstractBojeong Kim and colleagues from Virginia Tech and Duke University have investigated the characterization and environmental implications of nano- and larger TiO2 particles in sewage sludge and soils amended with sewage. They examined the most likely route of engineered TiO2 particles entering the soil environment by using analytical electron microscopic techniques, and provided detailed information regarding their occurrence, fate and behaviour in the sewage sludge materials and in mesocosm soils that had been amended with biosolid products.

Characterization and environmental implications of nano- and larger TiO2 particles in sewage sludge, and soils amended with sewage sludge
Bojeong Kim, Mitsuhiro Murayama, Benjamin P. Colman and Michael F. Hochella
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM10809G

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One Response to “Latest hot articles in JEM on urban stormwater sampling and characterising titanium dioxide nanoparticles”

  1. Ramesh says:

    I fully support this, and simlar, approaches to sewer infrastructure provision that both decentralises service areas and removes them from dependence on the traditional sewer network [which is designed with only 20% of its piped capacity for actual sewerage flows and the other 80% for stormwater infiltration – as well as the designed ability to overflow into the environment when such flows are exceeded eg during intense storms and floods]. The danger to the community from water-borne diseases, the adverse impact on the environment, as the cost of repairing such flooded traditional infrastructure is too great to continue to be accepted especially in flood-liable areas. Post-flood reconstruction should adopt these new technologies for phased replacement of the traditional networks in all flood-liable areas.

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