The future is lead-free for perovskite solar cells

Vicki Marshall writes about an EES article in Chemistry World

A lead-free and non-toxic alternative to current perovskite solar-cell technology has been reported by researchers in the UK: tin halide perovskite solar cells. They are also cheaper to manufacture than the silicon solar cells currently dominating the market.The future is lead-free for perovskite solar cells

Nakita Noel, part of Henry Snaith’s research team at the University of Oxford, describes how perovskite materials have caused a bit of a whirlwind since they came out in 2009: ‘Everybody that’s working in the solar community is looking to beat silicon.’ Despite the high efficiency of conventional crystalline silicon solar cells (around 20%), high production and installation costs decrease their economic feasibility and widespread use.

The challenge to find a cheaper alternative led to the development of perovskite-based solar cells, as organic–inorganic metal trihalide perovskites have both abundant and cheap starting materials. However, the presence of lead in some semiconductors could create toxicology issues in the future. As Noel puts it ‘every conference you present at somebody is bound to put up their hand and ask “What about the lead – isn’t this toxic?”

Interested to find out more? Read the full article by Vicki Marshall in Chemistry World.

Read the original article in Energy & Environmental Science.

Lead-Free Organic-Inorganic Tin Halide Perovskites for Photovoltaic Applications
Nakita K. Noel, Samuel D. Stranks, Antonio Abate, Christian Wehrenfennig, Simone Guarnera, Amir Haghighirad, Aditya Sadhanala, Giles E Eperon, Sandeep K. Pathak, Michael B Johnston, annamaria petrozza, Laura Herz and Henry Snaith
Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE01076K

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Designing next-generation activated carbons for advanced energy storage applications

Activated carbons for energy storage

Activated carbons for energy storage

In this interesting and informative article, M. Sevilla and R. Mokaya review state-of-the-art synthesis methods for the preparation of activated carbons and their application in energy storage systems. Specifically, the authors detail recent developments in the control of properties such as pore size distribution, surface area and structural and chemical characteristics – and how such properties relate to performance in hydrogen storage and supercapacitors.

Activated carbons have a number of desirable features that make them attractive for use in advanced energy-storage systems. As well as being relatively light-weight, low-cost and chemically inert, they also have very large surface areas (> 1000 m2/g) and high micropore volumes in which to interact with other species. This makes activated carbons particularly useful as supercapacitor electrodes and hydrogen storage materials – where performance is strongly related to surface area and pore characteristics.

In this review, recent developments in the fabrication of activated carbons are discussed, focusing particularly on methods which allow the control of features, such as pore size distribution, surface area and physical and chemical characteristics such as texture, morphology and heteroatom-doping. The relationship between these properties and the performance of these materials as supercapacitor electrodes and their use in hydrogen storage is also looked at in detail, providing a guide for the direction of future research in this very active field.

Interested? Read the full article here:

Energy storage applications of activated carbons: supercapacitors and hydrogen storage

Marta Sevilla and Roberts Mokaya

Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, 7, 1250–1280

DOI: 10.1039/C3EE43525C

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EES Lectureship Award at Clean Energy Conference

Presentation of EES readers choice lectureship

Winner of the 2013 EES Readers Choice Award Lecture Prof. Tom Jaramillo, and EES Deputy Editor Dr Heather Montgomery

Qingdao, China was the location for the lively and informative 2nd International Conference on Clean Energy Science (ICCES2), with lectures from key figures from around the world.

Energy & Environmental Science were delighted to present Professor Tom Jaramillo with the Energy & Environmental Science Readers’ Choice Lectureship Award at the event, and Prof. Jaramillo’s talk presenting insights on how to design a sustainable and efficient catalyst for CO2 reduction was very well received.

Prof. Jaramillo was awarded the lectureship for his EES article “New insights into the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide on metallic copper surfaces” which was one of the most downloaded articles in 2013.

To keep up to date with the latest published articles in Energy & Environmental Science, and our news and related events, sign up to our EES e-alerts and news service: http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/Journals/forms/V5profile.asp.

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This week’s HOT articles

Take a look at this week’s selection! These articles are available free for a limited time:

Si-based Earth abundant clathrates for solar energy conversion
Yuping He, Fan Sui, Susan M. Kauzlarich and Giulia Galli
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE00256C, Communication Graphical abstract: Experimental demonstration of enhanced photon recycling in angle-restricted GaAs solar cells

Improving the photoelectrochemical activity of La5Ti2CuS5O7 for hydrogen evolution by particle transfer and doping
Jingyuan Liu, Takashi Hisatomi, Guijun Ma, Aki Iwanaga, Tsutomu Minegishi, Yosuke Moriya, Masao Katayama, Jun Kubota and Kazunari Domen
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE00091A, Communication

Performance of a mixing entropy battery alternately flushed with wastewater effluent and seawater for recovery of salinity-gradient energy
Meng Ye, Mauro Pasta, Xing Xie, Yi Cui and Craig S. Criddle
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE01034E, Paper

Experimental demonstration of enhanced photon recycling in angle-restricted GaAs solar cells
Emily D. Kosten, Brendan M. Kayes and Harry A. Atwater
DOI: 10.1039/C3EE43584A, Communication

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Poster prize winners at Israel Chemical Society Annual meeting 2014

(L-R) Prof. Ehud Keinan (President of the Israel Chemical Society), Dr. Lioz Etgar, Dr. Sabrina Sartori (Poster prize winner), Prof. Roy Shenhar (Organizing committee).

Energy and Environmental Science was delighted to sponsor the 79th Annual Meeting of the Israel Chemical Society, took place at Dan Panorama Hotel and Convention Center in Tel Aviv in February 4- 5, 2014.

The two-day symposium and exhibition, which was organised by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, covered both basic and applied chemistry. The meeting provided outstanding opportunities for scientists and entrepreneurs, R&D researchers and engineers, students and teachers from the academy, industry and government, to interact, exchange ideas, share their new results and create new collaborative projects.

Congratulations to Dr. Sabrina Sartori, who was awarded an Energy and Environmental Science poster prize at the poster session!
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This week’s HOT articles

Take a look at this week’s selection! These articles are available free for a limited time: Graphical abstract: A wearable thermoelectric generator fabricated on a glass fabric

Improvement of open-circuit voltage and photovoltaic properties of 2D-conjugated polymers by alkylthio substitution
Chaohua Cui, Wai-Yeung Wong and Yongfang Li
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE00446A, Paper

Towards low-cost, environmentally friendly printed chalcopyrite and kesterite solar cells
Hamed Azimi, Yi Hou and Christoph J. Brabec
DOI: 10.1039/C3EE43865A, Review Article

A wearable thermoelectric generator fabricated on a glass fabric
Sun Jin Kim, Ju Hyung We and Byung Jin Cho
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE00242C, Paper

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Toilet flushes could help power homes

Abigail Hallowes writes about a HOT EES article in Chemistry World

Researchers in South Korea have devised a way to harness the motion of water, including from raindrops or from a flushing toilet, as a sustainable energy source.

Devices that renewably generate electricity in an uncomplicated manner are in demand. Now, Youn Sang Kim and his team at Seoul National University and Korea Electronics Technology Institute (KETI) have adapted a transducer to convert the mechanical energy from water motion into electrical energy.

Interested to know more? Read the full article by Abigail Hallowes on Chemistry World.

Read the original article in Energy & Environmental Science – it’s free to download until 27th May 2014!

The Effective Energy Harvesting Method from Natural Water Motion Active Transducer (WMAT)
Youn Sang Kim, Junwoo Park, YoungJun Yang, Eungkyu Lee, Soon-Hyung Kwon, Won Keun Kim, Cheouljong han, Jeongno Lee and Siyun Park
Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE00588K, Communication

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Visible light hydrogen production with carbonate-doped TiO2 microspheres

Martina Congiu is a guest web-writer for Energy and Environmental Science. Martina is currently a Research Technician in Dr Henry Snaith’s group at the University of Oxford. During her free time from work, she loves cooking and cycling in the outskirts of Oxford.

A simple “one-pot” solvothermal method has been developed to prepare high-surface-area mesoporous TiO2 microspheres in order to extend the light absorption from the ultraviolet to the visible region of the solar spectrum.

By Martina Congiu

Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a wide bandgap semiconductor, extensively studied for photocatalysis because nontoxic, abundant, stable and photoactive. Unfortunately, bare TiO2 absorbs photons only in the ultraviolet, hence the need to find suitable dopants to enhance its absorption in the visible region.

The new nonaqueous solvothermal method carried out by Liu and co-workers, shows how it is possible to synthesize carbon-doped microspheres with high specific surface area, tunable pore diameter and grain size, high crystallinity, well-defined morphology and high visible light absorption.

Furthermore, the new material was tested as solid-state photocatalyst under visible light irradiation. The experiment showed that doped-TiO2 microspheres created with this new method have an hydrogen production rate three times higher than commercial TiO2 nanoparticles.

Interested in a better understanding about this field? Read more from the Communication:

Doping high-surface-area mesoporous TiO2 microspheres with carbonate for visible light hydrogen production
Bin Liu, Li-Min Liu, Xiu-Feng Lang, Hsin-Yi Wang, Xiong Wen (David) Lou and Eray S. Aydil
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE00472H, Communication

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Water and energy

By Jeanne.

We are delighted to share with you the third of a series of collections of recent themed issues, articles and books on the topic of water. Here we have assembled some of the groundbreaking research and transformative reviews related to water and energy – focussing on the relevance of water in dealing with the challenge of energy production and sustainability – from across our journals. Read all these articles for free until 11 May 2014!

We are delighted to share with you a series of collections of recent books, themed issues and articles on the topic of water.  These four collections – one per month – demonstrate different aspects of water: its chemistry, its wide use in reactions and as a solvent, its relationship with energy and sustainability, as well as with human health and the environment.

Image (c) Shutterstock

Here, in our third collection, we have assembled some of the groundbreaking research and transformative reviews related to water and energy – focussing on the relevance of water in dealing with the challenge of energy production and sustainability – from across our journals.

“Water splitting to generate hydrogen fuel remains one the most challenging scientific and technological problems in renewable energy,” comments Professor Michael Wasielewski, Clare Hamilton Hall Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University, and Executive Director at the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern (ISEN).  “This collection of articles highlights a broad array of promising concepts, materials and methods for achieving this goal.”

“This excellent collection of articles highlights more broadly the ongoing interest and high activity around the world in the field of water splitting, solar fuels and the use of water in energy research,” notes Philip Earis, Executive Editor for Energy & Environmental Science, Nanoscale, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Green Chemistry, and Catalysis Science & Technology.  “We are delighted to publish impactful science in this important research area across a wide range of Royal Society of Chemistry journals, as the collection nicely illustrates.”

“This year, as the IPCC prepares to release the final contributions to their Fifth Assessment Report on climate change, it is timely to consider the role of chemistry in addressing global challenges, such as food, water, raw materials and energy,” remarks Professor Lesley Yellowlees, President of the Royal Society of Chemistry. “This collection from our journals shares the latest research from scientists around the world, aiming to tackle these challenges. Featuring original research and commentary by leaders in the field, we hope that you will find this high-quality collection engaging, inspirational and informative.”

You can read all of these articles for free until 11 May 2014! We truly hope you enjoy this collection.

We have already published our collections on the Chemistry of water and Chemistry in water.  Next month, watch out for our final collection on water in health and the environment.

Did you know that the RSC has put together a webpage on Water, which brings together information on activities for scientists, policymakers, educators and young people? Take a look today…

Related book and themed issueGA?id=C3CC43203C

This book and themed issue may be of interest – have a look…

Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting
Editors: Hans-Joachim Lewerenz, Laurie Peter
Copyright: 2013
Print ISBN: 978-1-84973-647-3; PDF eISBN: 978-1-84973-773-9; DOI:10.1039/9781849737739

ChemComm themed issue on Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution


Reviews and PerspectivesGA?id=C2EE03250C

Catalysts made of earth-abundant elements (Co, Ni, Fe) for water splitting: Recent progress and future challenges
Pingwu Du and Richard Eisenberg
Energy Environ. Sci., 2012,5, 6012-6021
DOI: 10.1039/C2EE03250C, Perspective

Plasmonic solar water splitting
Scott C. Warren and Elijah Thimsen
Energy Environ. Sci., 2012,5, 5133-5146
DOI: 10.1039/C1EE02875H, Review Article

Inorganic nanostructures for photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic water splitting
Frank E. Osterloh
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 2294-2320
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35266D, Review Article
From themed collection Solar fuels

Tetrametallic molecular catalysts for photochemical water oxidation
Andrea Sartorel, Marcella Bonchio, Sebastiano Campagna and Franco Scandola
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 2262-2280
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35287G, Review Article
From themed collection Solar fuels

GA?id=C2CS35019JNano-architecture and material designs for water splitting photoelectrodes
Hao Ming Chen, Chih Kai Chen, Ru-Shi Liu, Lei Zhang, Jiujun Zhang and David P. Wilkinson
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 5654-5671
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35019J, Tutorial Review

Design and development of photoanodes for water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells
John R. Swierk and Thomas E. Mallouk
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 2357-2387
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35246J, Review Article
From themed collection Solar fuels

Carbon nanofluidics of rapid water transport for energy applications
Hyung Gyu Park and Yousung Jung
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60253B, Tutorial Review

Polyoxometalate water oxidation catalysts and the production of green fuelGA?id=C2CS35292C
Hongjin Lv, Yurii V. Geletii, Chongchao Zhao, James W. Vickers, Guibo Zhu, Zhen Luo, Jie Song, Tianquan Lian, Djamaladdin G. Musaev and Craig L. Hill
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 7572-7589
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35292C, Critical Review
From themed collection Polyoxometalate cluster science

Comparison of primary oxidants for water-oxidation catalysis
Alexander R. Parent, Robert H. Crabtree and Gary W. Brudvig
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 2247-2252
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35225G, Tutorial Review
From themed collection Solar fuels

Earth-abundant hydrogen evolution electrocatalysts
James R. McKone, Smaranda C. Marinescu, Bruce S. Brunschwig, Jay R. Winkler and Harry B. Gray
Chem. Sci., 2014,5, 865
DOI:10.1039/C3SC51711J, Minireview

Charge carrier trapping, recombination and transfer in hematite (α-Fe2O3) water splitting photoanodes
Monica Barroso, Stephanie R. Pendlebury, Alexander J. Cowan and James R. Durrant
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 2724-2734
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC50496D, Perspective, Open Access

GA?id=C3TA12453CAdvances in the design of ordered mesoporous materials for low-carbon catalytic hydrogen production
David P. Serrano, Juan M. Coronado, Víctor A. de la Peña O’Shea, Patricia Pizarro and Juan Ángel Botas
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2013,1, 12016-12027
DOI: 10.1039/C3TA12453C, Highlight

Solar hydrogen production with semiconductor metal oxides: new directions in experiment and theory
Álvaro Valdés, Jeremie Brillet, Michael Grätzel, Hildur Gudmundsdóttir, Heine A. Hansen, Hannes Jónsson, Peter Klüpfel, Geert-Jan Kroes, Florian Le Formal, Isabela C. Man, Rafael S. Martins, Jens K. Nørskov, Jan Rossmeisl, Kevin Sivula, Aleksandra Vojvodic and Michael Zäch
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012,14, 49-70
DOI: 10.1039/C1CP23212F, Perspective


Original research articles

Photocatalytic water gas shift using visible or simulated solar light for the efficient, room-temperature hydrogen generation
Francesc Sastre, Marica Oteri, Avelino Corma and Hermenegildo García
Energy Environ. Sci., 2013,6, 2211-2215
DOI: 10.1039/C3EE40656C, Paper

Modeling, simulation, and design criteria for photoelectrochemical water-splitting systemsGA?id=C2EE23187E
Sophia Haussener, Chengxiang Xiang, Joshua M. Spurgeon, Shane Ardo, Nathan S. Lewis and Adam Z. Weber
Energy Environ. Sci., 2012,5, 9922-9935
DOI: 10.1039/C2EE23187E, Paper

Electrochemical water splitting by layered and 3D cross-linked manganese oxides: correlating structural motifs and catalytic activity
Arno Bergmann, Ivelina Zaharieva, Holger Dau and Peter Strasser
Energy Environ. Sci., 2013,6, 2745-2755
DOI: 10.1039/C3EE41194J, Paper

A hybrid energy cell for self-powered water splitting
Ya Yang, Hulin Zhang, Zong-Hong Lin, Yan Liu, Jun Chen, Ziyin Lin, Yu Sheng Zhou, Ching Ping Wong and Zhong Lin Wang
Energy Environ. Sci., 2013,6, 2429-2434
DOI: 10.1039/C3EE41485J, Communication

GA?id=C3SC51511GInterrogating the photogenerated Ir(IV) state of a water oxidation catalyst using ultrafast optical and X-ray absorption spectroscopy
Michael T. Vagnini, Michael W. Mara, Michael R. Harpham, Jier Huang, Megan L. Shelby, Lin X. Chen and Michael R. Wasielewski
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 3863-3873
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC51511G, Edge Article

Photocatalytic oxidation of water by polymeric carbon nitride nanohybrids made of sustainable elements
Jinshui Zhang, Marek Grzelczak, Yidong Hou, Kazuhiko Maeda, Kazunari Domen, Xianzhi Fu, Markus Antonietti and Xinchen Wang
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 443-446
DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00644D, Edge Article

Photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water using a cobalt pentapyridine complex in combination with molecular and semiconductor nanowire photosensitizers
Yujie Sun, Jianwei Sun, Jeffrey R. Long, Peidong Yang and Christopher J. Chang
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 118-124
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC21163G, Edge Article

Cu2O|NiOx nanocomposite as an inexpensive photocathode in photoelectrochemical water splittingGA?id=C2SC20874A
Chia-Yu Lin, Yi-Hsuan Lai, Dirk Mersch and Erwin Reisner
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 3482-3487
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20874A, Edge Article

Organic semiconductor for artificial photosynthesis: water splitting into hydrogen by a bioinspired C3N3S3 polymer under visible light irradiation
Zizhong Zhang, Jinlin Long, Lifang Yang, Wenkai Chen, Wenxin Dai, Xianzhi Fu and Xuxu Wang
Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 1826-1830
DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00257K, Edge Article

Passivating surface states on water splitting hematite photoanodes with alumina overlayers
Florian Le Formal, Nicolas Tétreault, Maurin Cornuz, Thomas Moehl, Michael Grätzel and Kevin Sivula
Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 737-743
DOI: 10.1039/C0SC00578A, Edge Article

Cobalt analogs of Ru-based water oxidation catalysts: overcoming thermodynamic instability and kinetic lability to achieve electrocatalytic O2 evolution
Matthew L. Rigsby, Sukanta Mandal, Wonwoo Nam, Lara C. Spencer, Antoni Llobet and Shannon S. Stahl
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 3058-3062
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20755A, Edge Article

Mesoporous g-C3N4 nanorods as multifunctional supports of ultrafine metal nanoparticles: hydrogen GA?id=C2SC20289Ageneration from water and reduction of nitrophenol with tandem catalysis in one step
Xin-Hao Li, Xinchen Wang and Markus Antonietti
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 2170-2174
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20289A, Edge Article

Photoelectrochemical properties of LaTiO2N electrodes prepared by particle transfer for sunlight-driven water splitting
Tsutomu Minegishi, Naoyuki Nishimura, Jun Kubota and Kazunari Domen
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 1120-1124
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC21845C, Edge Article

Amorphous molybdenum sulfide films as catalysts for electrochemical hydrogen production in water
Daniel Merki, Stéphane Fierro, Heron Vrubel and Xile Hu
Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 1262-1267
DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00117E, Edge Article

GA?id=C1SC00117E

Electrochemical water splitting by gold: evidence for an oxide decomposition mechanism
Oscar Diaz-Morales, Federico Calle-Vallejo, Casper de Munck and Marc T. M. Koper
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 2334-2343
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC50301A, Edge Article

A light-assisted, polymeric water oxidation catalyst that selectively oxidizes seawater with a low onset potential
Jun Chen, Pawel Wagner, Lei Tong, Danijel Boskovic, Weimin Zhang, David Officer, Gordon G. Wallace and Gerhard F. Swiegers
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 2797-2803
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC50812A, Edge Article

GA?id=C2SC21145AUnraveling the existence of dynamic water channels in light-harvesting proteins: alpha-C-phycocyanobilin in vitro
Hossam Elgabarty, Peter Schmieder and Daniel Sebastiani
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 755-763
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC21145A, Edge Article

Wilkinson’s iridium acetate trimer as a water-oxidation catalyst
Alexander R. Parent, James D. Blakemore, Gary W. Brudvig and Robert H. Crabtree
Chem. Commun., 2011,47, 11745-11747
DOI: 10.1039/C1CC15501F, Communication
From themed collection Artificial Photosynthesis

Template-free synthesis of Ta3N5 nanorod arrays for efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting
Chao Zhen, Lianzhou Wang, Gang Liu, Gao Qing (Max) Lu and Hui-Ming Cheng
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 3019-3021
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC40760H, Communication

Two-step fabrication of a porous γ-In2Se3 tetragonal photocatalyst for water splitting
Ding Wei, Zhengguo Lin, Zhentao Cui, Shuangyue Su, Dingkun Zhang, Minhua Cao and Changwen Hu
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 9609-9611
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC45598J, Communication

Quantum confinement controlled photocatalytic water splitting by suspended CdSe nanocrystalsGA?id=C1CC16082F
Michael A. Holmes, Troy K. Townsend and Frank E. Osterloh
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 371-373
DOI: 10.1039/C1CC16082F, Communication
From themed collection Artificial Photosynthesis

Mechanisms for proton release during water oxidation in the S2 to S3 and S3 to S4 transitions in photosystem II
Per E. M. Siegbahn
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012,14, 4849-4856
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP00034B, Paper

Synthesis of WO3@Graphene composite for enhanced photocatalytic oxygen evolution from water
Jingjing Guo, Yao Li, Shenmin Zhu, Zhixin Chen, Qinglei Liu, Di Zhang, Won-Jin Moon and Deok-Min Song
RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 1356-1363
DOI: 10.1039/C1RA00621E

GA?id=C3RA00030CDirect growth of carbon nanotubes on Ni/TiO2 as next generation catalysts for photoreduction of CO2 to methane by water under visible light irradiation
Wee-Jun Ong, Meei Mei Gui, Siang-Piao Chai and Abdul Rahman Mohamed
RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 4505-4509
DOI: 10.1039/C3RA00030C

New spinel oxide catalysts for visible-light-driven water oxidation
Franziska Conrad, Matthias Bauer, Denis Sheptyakov, Stephen Weyeneth, Dominik Jaeger, Kathrin Hametner, Pierre-Emmanuel Car, Jörg Patscheider, Detlef Günther and Greta R. Patzke
RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 3076-3082
DOI: 10.1039/C2RA20169K

Enhanced methane and hydrogen yields from catalytic supercritical water gasification of pine wood sawdust via pre-processing in subcritical water
Jude. A. Onwudili and Paul T. WilliamsGA?id=C3RA41362D
RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 12432-12442
DOI: 10.1039/C3RA41362D

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Power up with body heat

Charlotte Still writes about a HOT EES article in Chemistry World

A thermoelectric generator that converts body heat into electricity could make replacing or recharging batteries in wearable electronics a task of the past.

As the electronics market continues to expand there is a growing need for new ways to charge devices like smart watches and wearable medical sensors. However, conventional organic-based thermoelectric (TE) generators do not produce a high enough power output for use in wearable devices. And previously reported inorganic-based systems tend to use bulky, rigid and heavy ceramic substrates that increase thermal energy loss and limit their power output and energy conversion efficiency. The TE generator developed by Byung Jin Cho and his team at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology uses a glass fabric that is thinner, lighter and more flexible than other devices reported to date.

Interested to know more? Read the full article by Charlotte Still on Chemistry World.

Read the original article in Energy & Environmental Science – it’s free to download until 15th May 2014!

Wearable Thermoelectric Generator Fabricated on Glass Fabric
Sun Jin Kim, Ju Hyung We and Byung Jin Cho
Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE00242C, Paper

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