Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Professor David Lou is awarded the 2017 Energy & Environmental Science Readers’ Choice Lectureship

We are delighted to announce that Professor David Lou been selected by the EES Editorial Board as the winner of the 2017 “Energy & Environmental Science Readers’ Choice Lectureship”.

Professor David Lou

The Lectureship is awarded annually to one outstanding young scientist (within 10 years of receiving their PhD) who has published in the journal. The winner is selected by the EES Editorial Board from a shortlist of authors of the most-read articles from each issue of EES in the previous year; three of Professor Lou’s 2016 articles were shortlisted.

Professor David Lou received his BEng (1st class honors, 2002) and MEng (2004) degrees from the National University of Singapore. He obtained his PhD degree in chemical engineering from Cornell University in 2008. Right after graduation, he joined Nanyang Technological University (NTU) as an Assistant Professor. He was promoted to Associate Professor in September 2013, and Full Professor in September 2015. He has published ~272 papers with >42,500 citations, and has an H-index of 122 as of December 2017. His research interests are focused on designed synthesis of nanostructured materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage and photo/electrocatalysis. He is an Associate Editor for Journal of Materials Chemistry A.

Professor Lou will give his award lecture at an international energy conference in 2018 and is invited to contribute a Review article to EES.

Read Professor Lou’s Lectureship-winning research:

Self-supported formation of hierarchical NiCo2O4 tetragonal microtubes with enhanced electrochemical properties
Fei-Xiang Ma, Le Yu, Cheng-Yan Xu and Xiong Wen (David) Lou
Energy Environ. Sci., 2016, 9, 862-866. DOI: 10.1039/C5EE03772G

Carbon coated porous nickel phosphides nanoplates for highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction
Xin-Yao Yu, Yi Feng, Buyuan Guan, Xiong Wen (David) Lou and Ungyu Paik
Energy Environ. Sci., 2016, 9, 1246-1250. DOI: 10.1039/C6EE00100A

Bismuth oxide: a versatile high-capacity electrode material for rechargeable aqueous metal-ion batteries
Wenhua Zuo, Weihua Zhu, Dengfeng Zhao, Yunfei Sun, Yuanyuan Li, Jinping Liu and Xiong Wen (David) Lou
Energy Environ. Sci., 2016, 9, 2881-2891. DOI:  10.1039/C6EE01871H

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Energy & Environmental Science Impact Factor increases to 29.518

 

Energy & Environmental Science (EES) is delighted to announce its Impact Factor has increased to 29.518*.

This continued increase in Impact Factor cements EES‘ position as the leading journal in the field, further strengthening its position at the top of three Journal Citation Reports categories (Energy & Fuels; Engineering, Chemical; and Environmental Sciences), and moving the journal up to 3rd in the Chemistry, multidisciplinary category. As the home of exceptionally high quality, agenda-setting research relating to energy conversion and storage, alternative fuel technologies and environmental science, the 5-year Impact Factor of 24.781 means that research published in the journal has lasting impact and the Immediacy Index of 6.751 means articles are highly visible within the community as soon as they are published.

Our broad scope and the interdisciplinary nature of research published in the journal, coupled with our rigorous peer review and rapid times to publication of 52 days** from receipt to acceptance, ensures your work will quickly attract the attention it deserves.

We would like to thank all our authors, readers, reviewers and Editorial & Advisory Board members for making EES the number 1 journal in the field

Find the all the RSC’s journals newly published 2016 Impact Factors* here.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2016 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters).

**2016 average

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Outstanding Reviewers for Energy & Environmental Science in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Energy & Environmental Science in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Katsuhiko Ariga, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba
Professor Juan Bisquert, Universitat Jaume I
Professor Jaephil  Cho, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
Dr Seth Darling, Argonne National Laboratory
Dr Chengdu Liang, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Professor Xiong Wen (David) Lou, Nanyang Technological University
Professor Gaoquan Shi, Tsinghua University
Dr Yexiang Tong, Sun Yat-Sen University
Dr Sheng S Zhang, U.S. Army Research Laboratory
Professor Xinbo ZHANG, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC)

We would also like to thank the Energy & Environmental Science board and the Energy community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Dr Wolfgang Tress is awarded the 2016 Energy & Environmental Science Readers’ Choice Lectureship

We are delighted to announce that Dr Wolfgang Tress been selected by the EES Editorial Board as the winner of the 2016 “Energy & Environmental Science Readers’ Choice Lectureship” for his 2015 article, “Understanding the rate-dependent J–V hysteresis, slow time component, and aging in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells: the role of a compensated electric field”.

The Lectureship is awarded annually to one outstanding young scientist (within 10 years of receiving their PhD) who has published in the journal. The winner is selected by the EES Editorial Board from a shortlist of authors of the most-read articles from each issue of EES in the previous year.

Wolfgang Tress is currently working as a scientist at LPI, EPFL in Switzerland, with general interests in developing and studying novel photovoltaic concepts and technologies. His research focuses on the device physics of perovskite solar cells; most recently, investigating recombination and hysteresis phenomena in this emerging material system. Previously, he was analyzing and modeling performance limiting processes in organic solar cells.

Dr Tress will give his award lecture at the upcoming International Conference on Hybrid and Organic Photovoltaics (HOPV 17) meeting taking place in Lausanne, Switzerland from 21-24 May 2017. Register now to join us – the abstract submission deadline for oral presentations is the 8th February 2017.

Read Dr Tress’ Lectureship-winning research:

Understanding the rate-dependent J–V hysteresis, slow time component, and aging in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells: the role of a compensated electric field
W. Tress, N. Marinova, T. Moehl, S. M. Zakeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja Nazeeruddin and M. Grätzel
Energy Environ. Sci., 2015, 8, 995-1004. DOI: 10.1039/C4EE03664F

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Top 10 Reviewers for Energy & Environmental Science

In celebration of Peer Review Week, with the theme of Recognition for Review – we would like to highlight the top 10 reviewers for Energy & Environmental Science in 2016. They have been selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal.

Top 10 reviewers for Energy & Environmental Science
Dr Andrea Listorti, Universita del Salento
Dr Sheng S. Zhang, U.S. Army Research Laboratory
Professor Jaephil Cho, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
Dr Seth Darling, Argonne National Laboratory
Dr Chengdu Liang, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Professor David Mitlin, University of Alberta
Dr Zhenhai Wen, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Dr Kanzunori Takada, National Institute for Materials
Dr Falk Harnisch, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig
Dr Eva L. Unger, Lund University

We would like to say a massive thank you to these reviewers as well as the Energy & Environmental Science board and all of the community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

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CO2 photoreduction: shining a light on surface activation

CO2 photoreduction

Harnessing sunlight to produce fuel from CO2

Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 to solar fuels such as methane or methanol may be a promising route to sustainably meet our energy needs. Yet many existing photocatalysts suffer from poor product selectivity and efficiency, caused in part by the competing hydrogen evolution reaction that can occur in the presence of water.

Jinlong Gong and colleagues at Tianjin University, China, highlight recent strategies used to improve the adsorption and activation of CO2 at the catalyst surface – an important and under-researched step in this process – and discuss conditions influencing the reaction pathways leading to the photoreduction products. They also review how chemisorption of the molecule can be enhanced by tailoring properties such as catalyst surface area, surface defects and noble metal co-catalysts, and how factors such as electrolyte pH and CO2 absorption mode can influence product distribution.


Want to know more? Read this review article online, which is free to access until 6 May 2016:

CO2 photo-reduction: insights into CO2 activation and reaction on surfaces of photocatalysts” by X. Chang et al., DOI: 10.1039/C6EE00383D

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Water splitting using a single catalyst

Electrochemical water splitting typically requires two catalysts, one to evolve oxygen and one for hydrogen. However, scientists lead by Xile Hu at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland, have discovered that nickel phosphide can act as a catalyst, evolving both hydrogen oxygen from water simultaneously. Nickel phosphide was loaded onto a carbon electrode in an alkaline electrolyser which lead to the material adopting a core-shell structure, with a nickel phosphide core and an active nickel oxide species on the outside. The team observed successful water splitting, with the evolution of both hydrogen and oxygen and a current density of 10mA/cm2 at a low water splitting potential of 1.63V.

Want to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Osman Mohamed.

Or, take a look at the original article which is free to access until 7th August 2015:

Ni2P as a Janus catalyst for water splitting: the oxygen evolution activity of Ni2P nanoparticles” by L-A. Stern et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01155H

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Electricity harvested from magnetic noise

In Korea, Jungho Ryu and colleagues at the Korea Institute of Materials Science, have designed a magneto–mechano–electric generator that harvests magnetic energy from the environment.  It is made from a magnetostrictive single crystal composite that elongates and contracts in a low frequency magnetic field. The strain induced in this material outputs a voltage and Ryu’s team have demonstrated that their device can harvest energy from a vacuum pump cable to power 35 light emitting diodes. They are conducting further studies to improve its power density and the materials science community is excited about how this technology could be utilised in the future.

Want to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Heather Powell.

Or, take a look at the original article which is free to access until 15th June 2015:

Ubiquitous magneto-mechano-electric generator” by J. Ryu et al., DOI:10.1039/C5EE00414D

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Membrane-less water splitting device

A water splitting electrolyser typically contains an ion-conducting membrane which separates the electrodes and keeps the oxygen and hydrogen apart, preventing explosion. However, these membranes are expensive and thus the development of a membrane-less electrolyser is an exciting advance. Researchers at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, led by Demetri Psaltis, have developed such a device by exploiting the Segré–Silberberg effect. The oxygen and hydrogen are kept separate as the distance between the two electrodes is less than a few hundred micrometres and they do not mix because lift forces in the narrow passage push them towards the wall they evolved from.This is a microfluidic device that provides promising proof-of-concept and the group are now attempting to scale up.

Want to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Isobel Marr.

Or, take a look at the original article which is free to access untill 1st June 2015:

A membrane-less electrolyzer for hydrogen production across the pH scale” by S. Mohammad H. Hashemi,  Miguel A. Modestino and Demetri Psaltis, DOI:10.1039/C5EE00083A

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Register now for HOPV15

You are invited to participate in the International Conference on Hybrid and Organic Photovoltaics 2015, to be held in Rome, Italy, from 10-13 May 2015.

HOPV has been consolidated since 2009 as a unique forum for the advances in hybrid and organic photovoltaics. Now the 7th edition chaired by Prof. Filippo de Angelis and Prof. Mike McGehee, kindly invite you to present your latest research and participate in a major event in Rome, 10-13 May 2015. Of course the generous progress of perovskite solar cells will form a key part of the conference. The conference format is a full three days, multiple symposia meeting, with outstanding figures of the field as keynotes and invited speakers, and with also room for plenty of contributed talks by participant scientists and unlimited poster presentation.
 
Energy and Environmental Science is sponsoring three HOPV15 poster prize awards, with a first prize of 200 euros, second prize of 150 euros, and third prize of 100 euros.

HOPV15 banner

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