Archive for October, 2011

International Symposium on Advanced Complex Inorganic Nanomaterials Poster Prizes

EES was delighted to sponsor three poster prize awards at the International Symposium on Advanced Complex Inorganic Nanomaterials which was held in Namur, Belgium on 11-14 September 2011.

The meeting was a great success with around 270 participants from 37 different countries. The three EES poster prizes were awarded to:

1) Experimental and theoretical study of TiO2 anatase nanoparticles surfaces properties

Olivier Durupthy, Fabien Dufour, Asmae Bouzoubaa, Yuheng Wang, Sophie Cassaignon and Corinne Chaneac, Université P. M. Curie, Paris, France

2) Synthesis and formation process of e-Fe2O3 magnetic nanowire

Marie Yoshikiyo, Shunsuke Sakurai, Kotaro Tomita, Asuka Namai, Shin-ichi Ohkoshi, University of Tokyo, Japan

3) Optimization and characterization of synthesis of Ce doped Tatanium oxide nanotubes

Shunta Sakai, Takashi Oba, Cao Wai, Hani E. Elsayed-Ali and Takuya Suzuk, University of Kitakyushu, Japan


Submit your lastest research to EES today!

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Bacteria-based biocomputing for direct electric currents

EES Perspective article:

This perspective focuses on biological computing, particularly recent advances in the use of whole, live bacterial cells for simple biocomputing functions.

Bacteria-based biocomputing with Cellular Computing Circuits to sense, decide, signal, and act
Michaela A. TerAvest, Zhongjian Li and Largus T. Angenent
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1EE02455H

biocomputing

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Core-shell Pt/IrNi/C electrocatalysts show high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

Platinum has been the electrode material of choice for the oxygen reduction reaction which takes place in fuel cells. However it is expensive, and previous research using alloys of Pt with Co, Ni and Fe have required high Pt ratios.

Now researchers working at the Brookhaven National Laboratory have synthesized nanoparticles with a carbon-supported IrNi core and a surface monolayer of platinum. These nano-electocatalysts have an approximately 3 times higher Pt mass activity than currently available commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts.

Read the full details of this HOT EES paper:

Bimetallic IrNi core platinum monolayer shell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction
Kurian A. Kuttiyiel, Kotaro Sasaki, YongMan Choi, Dong Su, Ping Liu and Radoslav R. Adzic
DOI: 10.1039/C1EE02067F

experimental scheme

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Top ten most-read EES articles in September

This month sees the following articles in EES that are in the top ten most accessed in September:

A general strategy toward graphene@metal oxide core–shell nanostructures for high-performance lithium storage 
Weiwei Zhou, Jixin Zhu, Chuanwei Cheng, Jinping Liu, Huanping Yang, Chunxiao Cong, Cao Guan, Xingtao Jia, Hong Jin Fan, Qingyu Yan, Chang Ming Li and Ting Yu 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee02168k 

A self-assembled hierarchical nanostructure comprising carbon spheres and graphene nanosheets for enhanced supercapacitor performance 
Chun Xian Guo and Chang Ming Li 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01676h 

Graphene based new energy materials 
Yiqing Sun, Qiong Wu and Gaoquan Shi 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 1113-1132 
DOI: 10.1039/c0ee00683a 

Challenges in the development of advanced Li-ion batteries: a review 
Vinodkumar Etacheri, Rotem Marom, Ran Elazari, Gregory Salitra and Doron Aurbach 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 3243-3262 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01598b 

A perspective on solar-driven water splitting with all-oxide hetero-nanostructures 
Coleman X. Kronawitter, Lionel Vayssieres, Shaohua Shen, Leijin Guo, Damon A. Wheeler, Jin Z. Zhang, Bonnie R. Antoun and Samuel S. Mao 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 3889-3899 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee02186a 

Recent developments in nanostructured anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries 
Liwen Ji, Zhan Lin, Mataz Alcoutlabi and Xiangwu Zhang 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 2682-2699
DOI: 10.1039/c0ee00699h 

Tri-functional hierarchical TiO2 spheres consisting of anatase nanorods and nanoparticles for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells 
Jin-Yun Liao, Bing-Xin Lei, Dai-Bin Kuang and Cheng-Yong Su 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 4079-4085 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01574e 

Organic solar cells: A new look at traditional models 
Jonathan D. Servaites, Mark A. Ratner and Tobin J. Marks 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01663f 

Lithium-ion batteries. A look into the future 
Bruno Scrosati, Jusef Hassoun and Yang-Kook Sun 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 3287-3295 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01388b 

Carbon nanotube-coated macroporous sponge for microbial fuel cell electrodes 
Xing Xie, Meng Ye, Liangbing Hu, Nian Liu, James R. McDonough, Wei Chen, H. N. Alshareef, Craig S. Criddle and Yi Cui 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2012, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee02122b 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to EES? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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PCET2011 Conference sponsored by EES

Energy & Environmental Science was delighted to sponsor the 1st International Conference on Proton Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET2011) held in the Loire Valley, France from 9-13th October.

Energy & Environmental Science (EES) also plans to publish a collection of high-profile feature articles in a special issue to highlight some of the great research from this important first meeting bringing together the various disciplines involved with PCET.

Read some of the speakers recent articles published in EES:

“Fast food” energy
Daniel G. Nocera
DOI: 10.1039/C003891C

Water electrolysis and photoelectrolysis on electrodes engineered using biological and bio-inspired molecular systems
Phong D. Tran, Vincent Artero and Marc Fontecave
DOI: 10.1039/B926749B

EES themed issue, 2011, Issue 7
Biomimetic approaches to artificial photosynthesis
Guest Editors: Leif Hammarström and Michael Wasielewski

PCET

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New power for smart garments

Scientists in the US have taken the first steps towards designing a flexible and lightweight fabric that can act as a power supply for smart garments.

Electronic textiles, or ’smart’ textiles, are fabrics that have built-in functions such as sensing, data storage and communication. But as with all electronics, they require a power source. Conventional batteries are too bulky to wear, so a power source that can be combined and integrated into the garment is highly desirable.

Previous attempts to make wearable energy storage devices involved the use of nonwoven materials not usually used in clothes and expensive active materials like carbon nanotubes and nanowires.

Yury Gogotsi and colleagues at Drexel University, Philadelphia, have taken everyday fabrics like woven cotton and polyester materials and impregnated them with porous carbon powders, taking advantage of the natural porous nature of these materials. Using common techniques like screen printing, ink-jet printing and dip-coating, textile electrodes can be made on a large scale without the expense of new processes needing to be designed.

Smart battery woven into smart garments

A battery can be integrated into a garment by impregnating woven cotton and polyester fabrics with porous carbon

‘Our work makes a significant advancement in this area as our electrodes can store 400-700 times the energy per area of previously reported literature while also being flexible, non-toxic and has great potential to be integrated into textiles and clothing,’  says Gogotsi.   

The woven and knitted fabrics have empty space between individual fibres and between yarns, and it is into these spaces that the carbon powders are inserted, allowing ion transfer. The team were able to achieve higher mass loadings and capacitance levels on comparison with previous techniques.  

‘The relatively simple approach to engender conductivity to textile substrates has broad impact,’ comments Tushar Ghosh, a specialist in textile engineering from North Carolina State University, US. ‘The work contributes to the body of knowledge necessary for energy harvesting and storage in textiles of the future.’   

Although more work is needed to get a finished product, the hope is to develop this technology into a number of smart garment devices that can be used in a variety of fields such as healthcare, the army and even aerospace exploration. 

Rebecca Brodie   

Read the paper from Energy & Environmental Science:

Carbon coated textiles for flexible energy storage
Kristy Jost, Carlos R. Perez, John K. McDonough, Volker Presser, Min Heon, Genevieve Dion and Yury Gogotsi
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee02421c

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Energy powered by a grape

A miniature biofuel cell can generate electricity using the sugars in grapes, according to researchers in Japan.

The device has a needle bioanode that can be inserted into the grape, and a gas diffusion biocathode that uses oxygen in the air to oxidise the sugars. The maximum power produced was 26.5µW at 0.34V, which was used to power a light emitting diode (LED), which indicated the level of sugar in the grape.

The device could be used in the same way to test blood sugar levels (a test was done by inserting the needle into an animal vein) to monitor health.

Read this exciting EES paper now:

Enzymatic biofuel cells designed for direct power generation from biofluids in living organisms
T Miyake, K Haneda, N Nagai, Y Yatagawa, H Onami, S Yoshino, T Abe and M Nishizawa,
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee02200h

grape power

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Can we test geo-engineering?

Researchers in the US and Canada simulated solar radiation management (SRM), a form of geo-engineering that involves reflecting sunlight to reduce global warming.

Suggested approaches are to increase the amount of light-scattering stratospheric aerosols or increase the reflectivity of low-altitude marine clouds. The idea has attracted renewed interest but there are enormous uncertainties about the risks and effectiveness of SRM.

 The team used a HadCM3L programme for the simulations and came to the conclusion that solar geo-engineering could be tested to reduce uncertainty about climate response, but tests would require decades of modulated climate forcing.

 Read the EES article today hot off the press!

Can we test geoengineering?
D G MacMynowski, D W Keith, K Caldeira and H-J Shin,
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01256h

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PCET 2011: off to a great start!

PCET 2011, the 1st International Conference on Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer, got off to an exciting and dynamic start yesterday.

This conference is the first of its kind; aiming to bring together all the different research areas that are working on proton and and electron transfer. So far it has sparked lively debate, with lectures going on until 11pm on the first evening!

The first two lectures aimed to give an insight into the diverse research areas which study proton-coupled electon transfer. Joanne Stubbe gave the opening lecture on the biological aspects of PCET and its role in enzyme activity. The next talk was by Jean-Michel Saveant, who discussed PCET and electochemistry.

EES are sponsoring PCET 2011 and we were delighted to host the Verre de l’amite last night where the debate and discussion went on late into the night! It’s going to be an exciting week…!

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Top Ten most-read EES articles in August

This month sees the following articles in EES that are in the top ten most accessed in August:

Superhydrophobic conjugated microporous polymers for separation and adsorption 
An Li, Han-Xue Sun, Da-Zhi Tan, Wen-Jie Fan, Shu-Hao Wen, Xiao-Juan Qing, Gui-Xian Li, Shi-You Li and Wei-Qiao Deng 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 2062-2065 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01092a 

Challenges in the development of advanced Li-ion batteries: a review 
Vinodkumar Etacheri, Rotem Marom, Ran Elazari, Gregory Salitra and Doron Aurbach 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 3243-3262 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01598b 

Multilayer nanoassembly of Sn-nanopillar arrays sandwiched between graphene layers for high-capacity lithium storage 
Liwen Ji, Zhongkui Tan, Tevye Kuykendall, Eun Ji An, Yanbao Fu, Vincent Battaglia and Yuegang Zhang Energy
Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 3611-3616 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01592c 

Lithium-ion batteries. A look into the future 
Bruno Scrosati, Jusef Hassoun and Yang-Kook Sun 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 3287-3295 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01388b 

Stretchable, elastic materials and devices for solar energy conversion 
Darren J. Lipomi and Zhenan Bao 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 3314-3328 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01881g 

Recent developments in nanostructured anode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries 
Liwen Ji, Zhan Lin, Mataz Alcoutlabi and Xiangwu Zhang 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 2682-2699 
DOI: 10.1039/c0ee00699h 

All-carbon-nanofiber electrodes for high-energy rechargeable Li–O2 batteries 
Robert R. Mitchell, Betar M. Gallant, Carl V. Thompson and Yang Shao-Horn 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 2952-2958 
DOI:10.1039/c1ee01496j 

Graphene based new energy materials 
Yiqing Sun, Qiong Wu and Gaoquan Shi 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 1113-1132 
DOI: 10.1039/c0ee00683a 

A high-performance asymmetric supercapacitor fabricated with graphene-based electrodes 
Jintao Zhang, Jianwen Jiang, Hongliang Li and X. S. Zhao 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01354h 

In situ TEM electrochemistry of anode materials in lithium ion batteries 
Xiao Hua Liu and Jian Yu Huang 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/c1ee01918j 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to EES? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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