Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Congratulations to the poster prize winners at ISACS 2017!

The latest International Symposium on Advancing the Chemical Sciences (ISACS) was held recently in Manchester, UK, and focused on Challenges in Inorganic Chemistry. The conference covered all aspects of inorganic chemistry, including organometallic, coordination, main group, bioinorganic, and materials chemistry, and boasted a great line-up of internationally-renowned plenary speakers.

 

Professor Richard Layfield, Conference organizer and Dalton Transactions Associate Editor, presented poster prizes. The winners of the Dalton Transactions poster prizes were Nikolaos Tsoureas and Monojit Ghosal Chowdhury. Nikolaos is a post-doctoral research associate, working with Professor Geoffrey Cloke at the University of Sussex, UK. He presented a poster entitled “Synthesis and reactivity of syn-bimetallic titanium hydrides“. Monojit is a PhD researcher in the group of Professor Sundargopal Ghosh at the Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India, and presented a poster entitled “Electron precise diborane units stabilized in the coordination sphere of group 5 transition metals: A new outcome“. The winners are pictured below with a Chemistry World poster prize winner Jasmine Cross who is working towards a PhD with Dr James Walton at Durham University, UK.

Monojit Chowdhury (left) and Richard Layfield (right)

Jasmine Cross (left), Nikolaos Tsoureas (centre), and Richard Layfield (right)

 

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Register Now for the 1st Applications of Photoactive Coordination Compounds conference

The 1st Applications of Photoactive Coordination Compounds conference, a preconference of the 22nd International Symposium on the Photophysics and Photochemistry of Coordination Compounds, will be held July 5th to the 7th in St Andrews, UK.

The conference website is open for registration and abstract submission. Poster abstract submission closes May 1st, General registration closes June 2nd.

The conference boasts a series of internationally renowned plenary and invited speakers:

Stefan Bernhard (Carnegie Mellon)
Luisa De Cola (Université de Strasbourg)
Ifor Samuel (University of St Andrews)
Kirk Schanze (University of Florida)
Chihaya Adachi (Kyushu University)
Paola Ceroni (University of Bologna)
Yun Chi (National Tsing Hua University)
Garry Hanan (University of Montreal)
Masako Kato (University of Hokkaido)
Max Massi (Curtin University)
Eric Meggers (Philipps-Universitat Marburg)
Jerry Meyer (University of North Carolina)
Ken Sakai (Kyushu University)
Mark Thompson (University of Southern California)

 

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Celebrate Canadian Chemistry with the RSC!

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Chemistry Conference, and the 150th birthday of Canada itself, we’ve released a special cross-journal web collection that highlights the excellence and breadth of Canadian research.

 

It’s free to access until June 18th and features papers in Dalton Transactions and twenty other RSC journals. It contains contributions from our Editorial and Advisory Boards, including Dalton Transactions Associate Editor Warren Piers, who also acts as a guest editor.

 

 

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Poster Prize Winner at the University of California Chemical Symposium

Left: Crystal structure of spin frustrated TiCrIr2B2 with Cr3 triangles and trigonal planar B4 unites.

Right: No-spin polarized (top) and spin polarized (bottom) crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) curves for Cr−Cr interaction in TiCrIr2B2.

Congratulations to the Poster Prize winner at the University of California Chemical Symposium (UCCS): Yuemei Zhang. Yuemei is currently working in the group of Boniface Fokwa at the University of California Riverside. Her poster was entitled “Magnetic Ordering, Frustration and Possible Spin Liquid State from 1D Cr3-Triangles in the TiCrIr2-xOsxB2 Series“.

The meeting was supported by ten UC departments (UC Davis, UCLA, UC San Diego, UC Berkeley, UC Riverside, UC Santa Cruz, UC Irvine, UC Santa Barbara, UC Merced, and UC San Francisco). All areas of chemistry, including inorganic, organic, biological, analytical and physical chemistry were represented and the symposium provided an excellent opportunity for graduate students and postdocs to not only present their work in a multidisciplinary environment, but also take part in different workshops to further their career and establish connections with professionals from industry, government and alternative science jobs.

The prize was presented by the RSC Editorial Development Manager, Americas, Dr Jennifer Griffiths.

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Intercalation Chemistry celebration through ISIC19: this year in Assisi, Italy

The 19th Edition of the International Symposium on Intercalation Compounds (ISIC19) will focus on the peculiar properties of intercalation materials. These solids have experienced a great development in recent years and represent now an established specific domain of solid-state research and materials sciences. The design and the characterization of intercalation compounds with advanced functional properties demands interdisciplinary competency in fields such as chemistry, solid-state physics and biology. This Symposium offers a unique opportunity for the Intercalation Compounds Community to bring together information, results and ideas that will stimulate further exploration in the field of intercalation compounds.

Registration deadline: April 20th, 2017

Find out more here 

 

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A very warm welcome to Richard Layfield

Please join us in welcoming Professor Richard Layfield who has recently joined the Dalton Transactions Editorial Board as an Associate Editor. Based at The University of Manchester, U.K, where he is Professor of Inorganic Chemistry and Assistant Vice-Dean for Research, his research interests include lanthanide organometallic chemistry, 3d transition metal amide chemistry and carbene chemistry, applications of coordination/organometallic chemistry in molecular magnetism (particularly single-molecule magnets). He also has some interests in catalytic transformations involving heavier p-block elements.

When joining the Board, Professor Layfield said:

“I am very much looking forward to working with the Dalton Transactions team, and to contributing to developing the Editorial Board’s vision for the journal.”

Recent articles by Professor Layfield published in Dalton Transactions include:

Magnetic frustration in a hexaazatrinaphthylene-bridged trimetallic dysprosium single-molecule magnet
Richard Grindell, Veacheslav Vieru, Thomas Pugh, Liviu F. Chibotaru and Richard A. Layfield
Dalton Trans., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C6DT01763K

Molecular and electronic structures of donor-functionalized dysprosium pentadienyl complexes
Benjamin M. Day, Nicholas F. Chilton and Richard A. Layfield
Dalton Trans., 2015,44, 7109-7113, DOI: 10.1039/C5DT00346F

Reactivity of three-coordinate iron–NHC complexes towards phenylselenol and lithium phenylselenide
Thomas Pugh and  Richard A. Layfield
Dalton Trans., 2014,43, 4251-4254, DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53203H

Sonja N. König, Nicholas F. Chilton, Cäcilia Maichle-Mössmer, Eufemio Moreno Pineda, Thomas Pugh, Reiner Anwander and Richard A. Layfield
Dalton Trans., 2014,43, 3035-3038, DOI: 10.1039/C3DT52337C
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Malcolm Green’s 80th Birthday Symposium

We are delighted to announce the success of Malcolm Green‘s 80th Birthday Symposium that was held at the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory and Balliol College, University of Oxford, UK, on 14th May 2016. Malcolm was presented with a copy of a collection of his articles published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, highlighting his vast contribution to Inorganic Chemistry over the last 50 years. Please join us in wishing Malcolm a very Happy Birthday!

Image credit: Polly Arnold

Image credits: Karl Harrison

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Nitrogen Reduction By Homogeneous Fe Complexes Revisited

Geographer Vaclav Smil described the Haber-Bosch process as the “detonator of the human population explosion” in the twentieth century, in his Nature Millennium Essay.1 Today, nearly 80% of nitrogen atoms in human tissue have been through the Haber-Bosch process;2 where nitrogen gas is converted to ammonia converted into industrial fertilizers.

The Haber-Bosch process has now entered its second century. High temperatures and pressures and a catalyst composed of magnetite (Fe3O4), wüstite (FeO) and iron(0) metal,  push the equilibrium of a mixture of pure hydrogen, nitrogen and ammonia gas towards the formation of ammonia.  Today, one of the greatest challenges of industrial chemistry is to find an alternative catalyst and process.

In 1991 Leigh et. al. reported the nitrogen of nitrogen by a homogeneous Fe complex with two chelating phosphine ligands.3 They were able to reduce N2 to ammonia (isolated as NH4+) under strongly acidic conditions. However, following this discovery, verification and mechanistic questions remained.

The previously unreported dimer

In a recent article, ‘Teaching old compounds new tricks: efficient N2 fixation by simple Fe(N2)(diphosphine)2 complexes‘ published in Dalton Transactions, , Ashley and co-workers report their investigation of the Leigh compound. They have persued a peak that was previously unaccounted for in the 31P NMR spectrum which has led them to isolate a unique dimer of this complex, bridged by molecular N2.  Comparing the reactivities of this dimer with the two monomers that feature different simple chelating phosphine ligands, they unambiguously report yields of NH3 and N2H4 after reaction with triflic acid, and discern dependences based on ligand, temperature, and solvent.

This hitherto unreported dimeric compound, and the impressive NH3/N2H4 yields achieved with the monomers tested, add a significant piece to the puzzle of how iron-mediated N2 activation occurs.

Read the full article here:

Teaching old compounds new tricks: efficient N2 fixation by simple Fe(N2)(diphosphine)2 complexes
Laurence R. Doyle, Peter J. Hill, Gregory G. Wildgoose and Andrew E. Ashley
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6DT00884D

1V. Smil Nature 1999, 400, 415.

2R. W. Howarth Harmful Algae 2008, 8, 14.

3J. G. Leigh and M. Jimenez-Tenorio, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1991, 113, 5862.

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The 6th International IMBG Meeting & Advanced Courses

6th International IMBG MeetingDalton Transactions and Metallomics are proud to be sponsoring poster prizes for the 6th International IMBG Meeting on Chemistry & Biology of Iron-Sulfur Clusters.
The meeting will be held on 13-18 September 2015, in Villard de Lans, a village located near Grenoble, France, in the beautiful surrounding of the Vercors mountains. It will include a two-day Advanced Course followed by a two and half day Conference.

Click here for full information and register today!

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Call for papers: Themed issues

Dalton Transactions coverWe are delighted to announce four new Dalton Transactions themed issues:

Metallodrugs: Activation, Targeting and Delivery
Deadline: 12th April 2016
Guest Editors: Professor Dr Nils Metzler-Nolte (Ruhr-Universität Bochum), Professor Dr Zijian Guo (Nanjing University)

In 1965, a seminal paper by Barnett Rosenberg appeared in Nature, describing the anti-proliferative properties of a very simple inorganic compound, now known to all of us as Cisplatin. This discovery, and the subsequent clinical approval of Cisplatin, has led to thousands of papers, and it has arguably initiated the field of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Now, 50 years after Rosenberg’s discovery, the field has matured and, beyond Cisplatin, many other compounds have been explored for their anti-proliferative activity. Moreover, chemical creativity has shifted from the mere discovery of new active agents, and elucidation of their mode of action (as difficult as that may be at times) to issues such as delivery of anti-proliferative agents to cancer cells, activation of inorganic prodrugs, and very creative approaches to targeting malignant cells exclusively.

A Themed Issue of Dalton Transactions now seeks to explore these frontiers in the art of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Crucially, the Issue will aim to provide an overview of current progress in three focal points of inorganic drug development: activation (for example, by light, enzymes or external stimuli), targeting (that is, bioconjugates, using the EPR effect, and so on) or selective delivery (to cancer cells or intra-cellularly, by nanoparticles or other carrier systems, and so on).

Although certainly important, the discovery of new compounds or elucidation of a mode of action are not topics for this issue — but Dalton Transactions is of course an excellent place for dissemination of such results in a regular Paper.

Small molecule activation
Deadline: 30th April 2016
Guest Editors: Professor Martin Albrecht (University of Bern), Professor Eric Clot (University of Montpellier), Professor Giulia Licini (University of Padova), Professor Barbara Milani (University of Trieste)

Small molecule activation constitutes one of the main frontiers of inorganic and organometallic chemistry, with much effort directed towards the development of new processes for the selective and sustainable transformation of abundant small molecules such as H2O, NH3, N2, O2, CO, or CO2 into high-value chemical feedstocks and energy resources.

This themed issue will focus on homogenously catalysed activation of small molecules, as well as stoichiometric reactions that further our understanding towards such ends. We invite submissions covering any relevant aspect of small molecule activation including: organometallic chemistry, (electro)catalysis, photochemistry, mechanistic studies, spectroscopy, synthesis, and developments in materials science.

Reactions Facilitated by Ligand Design
Deadline: 10th May 2016
Guest Editor: Professor Jason Love (The University of Edinburgh)

This issue will focus on transformations involving inorganic complexes where a ligand design approach has been used to produce a demonstrable change in reactivity. Papers can be submitted from any area of inorganic or organometallic chemistry, including catalysis, small molecule activation, C–X bond activation, bioinorganic chemistry and supramolecular chemistry. Ligand classes could include pincers, carbenes, macrocyclic ligands, phosphines or metallocenes, with approaches for goal-oriented ligand design involving aspects such as redox non-innocence, steric hindrance, secondary coordination sphere effects and manipulation of Lewis pairs.

Molecular Spintronics: The role of Coordination Chemistry
Deadline: 17th May 2016
Guest Editors: Professor Eugenio Coronado (University of Valencia), Professor Masahiro Yamashita (Tohoku University)

This issue intends to show the impact of coordination chemistry in the emerging field of Molecular Spintronics.

Coordination chemistry provides many examples of molecules that can be useful in this field: from metal complexes that can be incorporated into spintronic devices, as spin collectors or spin filters, to magnetic molecules that can behave as bits of memory or even as spin qubits.

This issue will cover the three different facets of the field, namely: 1) the use of molecules in the development of a new generation of spintronic devices; 2) the miniaturization of the device to reach the single-molecule limit (molecular nanospintronics); and 3) The search for molecular spin qubits of interest in quantum computing.

In this multidisciplinary field, chemists work in close interaction with solid-state physicists, including theoreticians as well as experimentalists, and materials scientists. Contributions coming from the three scientific communities in which these scientists are integrated – Spintronics, Molecular Electronics and Molecular Magnetism – are expected.

Does your research fit into any of these subject areas? If so, we would welcome your contribution. Please see below for further details on how to submit:

How to submit

All types of manuscript – communications, full papers and Perspectives, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to normal peer review and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission which themed issue you would like to be considered for.

Interested in submitting  paper? Please contact us for more information

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