Archive for the ‘Themed Issues’ Category

Highlights from the upcoming Coordination Programming themed issue

We will shortly be publishing a themed issue titled “Coordination Programming: Science of Molecular Superstructures towards Chemical Devices” in Dalton Transactions. As a taster of what is coming, the following is a selection of articles from the issue that is recommended as HOT by our referees.


Relative anion binding affinity in a series of interpenetrated coordination cages
Marina Frank, Johannes M. Dieterich, Sabrina Freye, Ricardo A. Mata and Guido H. Clever

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51709H, Communication

Relative anion binding affinity in a series of interpenetrated coordination cages


Guest responsivity of a two-dimensional coordination polymer incorporating a cholesterol-based co-ligand
Kazuki Kajitani, Tomomi Koshiyama, Akihiro Hori, Ryo Ohtani, Akio Mishima, Kohei Torikai, Makoto Ebine, Tohru Oishi, Masaki Takata, Susumu Kitagawa and Masaaki Ohba

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51465J, Communication

Guest Responsivity of a Two-Dimensional Coordination Polymer Incorporating a Cholesterol-Based Co-Ligand


Programmed multiple complexation for the creation of helical structures from acyclic phenol–bipyridine oligomer ligands
Shigehisa Akine, Hiroki Nagumo and Tatsuya Nabeshima

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51240A, Paper

Programmed multiple=


Plasmon-induced oxidation of gold nanoparticles on TiO2 in the presence of ligands
Yohei Konishi, Ichiro Tanabe and Tetsu Tatsuma

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51495A, Paper

Plasmon-induced oxidation of gold nanoparticles on TiO2 in the presence of ligands


Programming MOFs for water sorption: amino-functionalized MIL-125 and UiO-66 for heat transformation and heat storage applications
Felix Jeremias, Vasile Lozan, Stefan K. Henninger and Christoph Janiak

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51471D, Paper

Programming MOFs for water sorption: Amino-functionalized MIL-125 and UiO-66 for heat transformation and heat storage applications


Ternary metal Prussian blue analogue nanoparticles as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries
Masashi Okubo and Itaru Honma

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51369F, Communication

Ternary metal Prussian blue analogue nanoparticles as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries


A bis(terpyridine)iron network polymer on carbon for a potential energy storage material
Kuo-Hui Wu, Hiroaki Maeda, Tetsuya Kambe, Ken Hoshiko, Eunice Jia Han Phua, Ryota Sakamoto and Hiroshi Nishihara

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51186C, Communication

A bis(terpyridine)iron network polymer on carbon for a potential energy storage material

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Dalton Discussion 14 – Advancing the chemistry of actinides

Now welcoming abstract submissions for Dalton Discussion 14 – Advancing the Chemistry of Actinides

16th–18th September 2013, Edinburgh, UK

Confirmed speakers: Geoff Cloke, University of Sussex, UK
  Melissa Denecke, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  Laurent Maron, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France
  Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley, USA
  Nik Kaltsoyannis, University College London, UK
  Marinella Mazzanti, CEA, Grenoble, France
  Paula Diaconescu, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  Jonathan Lloyd, University of Manchester, UK

This Dalton Discussion aims to highlight the burgeoning role, and exciting prospects for actinides in modern, metal-based chemistry. Abstracts for oral presentations must be sent in before 15th February 2013.

Authors of the selected oral abstracts will then be expected to submit their work as a full paper, which will form the basis of their short presentation at the Discussion meeting. The paper itself must contain new, unpublished work and be submitted for review to the Editorial Office of Dalton Transactions by 16th August 2013. At the conference, each author will be given approximately 5 minutes to summarise the key points of their paper in order to leave the majority of time open for discussion

This year, Dalton Discussion 14 is adopting a new process. Papers presented at Dalton Discussions will continue to be published in a dedicated themed issue of Dalton Transactions, however article peer-review will now take place after the Discussion. This means that speakers have longer to make the finishing touches to their article before the papers are made available online prior to the meeting.

To find out more about Dalton Discussion 14 and to submit your abstract, visit the dedicated RSC webpage.

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Studying hydrogen activation of FLPs

Scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have investigated the mechanism of heterolytic H2 activation by frustrated lewis pairs (FLPs). To do this, they employed an unique approach of solution calorimetry and were able to obtain the enthalpies and relative rates of H2 activation.

With the exception of previous studies that partly relied on theoretical calculations, there has not been a great deal of work devoted to understanding how molecular hydrogen is activated by FLPs. Autrey and colleagues have found that H2 activation rates using such species are relatively fast considering no metals are involved. They discovered that the rate was dependent on the structure of the Lewis basic amine involved, and that diffusion of hydrogen across the gas-liquid interface is not rate limiting.

Further work is needed to extract fundamental rate constants, kinetic orders, and activation barriers, say the researchers.

Read the article now to find out more…
A thermodynamic and kinetic study of the heterolytic activation of hydrogen by frustrated borane–amine Lewis pairs
Abhi Karkamkar, Kshitij Parab, Donald M. Camaioni, Doinita Neiner, Herman Cho, Thomas K. Nielsen and Tom Autrey

This article is part of an upcoming themed issue on Boranes and Borohydrides, guest edited by Simon Aldridge. Other articles by this author include:

Methods to stabilize and destabilize ammonium borohydride
Thomas K. Nielsen, Abhi Karkamkar, Mark Bowden, Flemming Besenbacher, Torben R. Jensen and Tom Autrey

Also of interest… Take a look at our recent themed issue in Frustrated Lewis Pairs

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No stone left unturned at Dalton Discussion 13

This year’s Dalton Discussion meeting was based at the University of Sheffield and focused on the topic of Inorganic Photophysics and Photochemistry – Fundamentals and Applications.

The 3 day programme was rich with contributions from Keynote speakers, Richard Eisenberg, Majed Chergui, Peter Ford and Luisa De Cola; Invited speakers, Craig Hill, David Parker, and Chantal Daniel; amongst numerous other excellent presenations from researchers across the international community.

 Majed Chergui and Andrea Barbieri  Richard Eisenberg  Craig Hill


The Dalton Discussion format differs slightly from other conferences in that speakers are alloted short 5-10 minute slots to deliver a snappy overview of their latest research based on the contents of their article which will shortly be published in a themed issue of Dalton Transactions.

For every 3 presentations, there follows an hour long discussion amongst the delegates – an excellent opportunity for researchers to get down to the gritty detail of the experiments, understand any tricky concepts, and offer alternative ideas to take the research forward. It was great to see even the graduate students asking questions – something that is sadly, rarely seen at conferences.

 

The poster sessions were also of great success. Many congratulations to Sven Hansen, Elizabeth Bagaley and Lucy Jones who won the Dalton Transactions, ChemComm and RSC Books poster prizes, respectively. 

DD13 Poster Prize winners
Otto Horvath in conversation with Peter Burks, student of Peter Ford at UCSB From left to right: Lucy Jones (University of Manchester), Sven Hansen (Rostock University), Elizabeth Baggaley (University of Sheffield). No conference is complete without networking at the welcome reception

 

I am already very much looking forward to what next year’s Dalton Discussion meeting has to offer – which will be adopting a new and improved format for article submission. Watch this space…

Many thanks go to Mike Ward for providing photographs and also for organising such an excellent meeting! 

Also of interest…
See here for the RSC’s report on Solar Fuels and Artificial Photosynthesis: Science and innovation to change our future energy options

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Stronger crystal field interactions give actinides advantage over lanthanides in single-molecule magnet construction at high temperatures.

Slow magnetic relaxation in homoleptic trispyrazolylborate complexes of neodymium(III) and uranium(III)Jeffrey Rinehart and Jeffrey Long compare the dynamic properties of the 4f3 complex, NdTp3 (Tp = trispyrazolylborate), and its isostructural 5f3 congener, UTp3. This is the first direct comparison of slow magnetic relaxation behaviour for isostructural and valence isoelectronic lanthanide and actinide complexes.

Download the manuscript which is free to access for 4 weeks to find out more.

Slow magnetic relaxation in homoleptic trispyrazolylborate complexes of neodymium(III) and uranium(III)
Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31352A, Communication

This manuscript is part of a themed issue titled Frontier and Perspectives in Molecule-Based Quantum Magnets which is due to be published later in the year. Below is a selection of papers also due to be included in this themed issue:

Single-ion magnet behaviour in [U(TpMe2)2I]
Joana T. Coutinho,  Maria A. Antunes,  Laura C. J. Pereira,  Hélène Bolvin,  Joaquim Marçalo,  Marinella Mazzanti and Manuel Almeida
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31421E, Communication

Controlling magnetic communication through aromatic bridges by variation in torsion angle
Thomas B. Faust,  Floriana Tuna,  Grigore A. Timco,  Marco Affronte,  Valerio Bellini,  Wolfgang Wernsdorfer and Richard E. P. Winpenny
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31292A, Paper

A oximato-bridged linear trinuclear [MnIVMnIIIMnIV] single-molecule magnet
Chang-Long Zhou,  Zhe-Ming Wang,  Bing-Wu Wang and Song Gao
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31039B, Paper

Are you following us on Twitter? @DaltonTrans

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Frustrated Lewis pairs themed issue now published

We strongly recommend you have a browse of Dalton Transactions’ latest themed issue in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

As Guest Editor, Doug Stephan says in his Editorial: there’s nothing frustrating about frustrated Lewis pairs! Particularly as these highly reactive compounds are gaining increasing attention from researchers wishing to activate dihydrogen, olefins, disulfides, CO2… the list continues…

The issue contains 18 articles dedicated to the topic – a small selection is below:

Hydrogen activation by 2-boryl-N,N-dialkylanilines: a revision of Piers’ ansa-aminoborane
Konstantin Chernichenko, Martin Nieger, Markku Leskelä and Timo Repo

Frustrated Lewis pair addition to conjugated diynes: Formation of zwitterionic 1,2,3-butatriene derivatives
Philipp Feldhaus, Birgitta Schirmer, Birgit Wibbeling, Constantin G. Daniliuc, Roland Fröhlich, Stefan Grimme, Gerald Kehr and Gerhard Erker

Fixation of carbon dioxide and related small molecules by a bifunctional frustrated pyrazolylborane Lewis pair
Eileen Theuergarten, Janin Schlösser, Danny Schlüns, Matthias Freytag, Constantin G. Daniliuc, Peter G. Jones and Matthias Tamm

Access the issue here

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Highlights from themed issues covering metal–organic frameworks

MOF's Metal organic frameworks coordination polymers

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The exciting chemistry of metal-organic frameworks (MOF’s) attracts interest from a range of communities within the chemical sciences. Recently  the Journal of Materials Chemistry published a themed issue ‘Integrating functionality into metal–organic frameworks’ and Dalton Transactions ‘Coordination chemistry in the solid state’.

You can see the full issues by clicking on the links above, alternatively you can browse the highlights below, which are free to download until the 27th July.

Metal–organic frameworks as scaffolds for the encapsulation of active species: state of the art and future perspectives
Jana Juan-Alcañiz, Jorge Gascon and Freek Kapteijn
J. Mater. Chem., 2012,22, 10102-10118
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Supramolecular isomers of metal–organic frameworks: the role of a new mixed donor imidazolate-carboxylate tetradentate ligand
Victoria J. Richards, Stephen P. Argent, Adam Kewley, Alexander J. Blake, William Lewis and Neil R. Champness
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 4020-4026

Effect of the organic functionalization of flexible MOFs on the adsorption of CO2
Thomas Devic, Fabrice Salles, Sandrine Bourrelly, Béatrice Moulin, Guillaume Maurin, Patricia Horcajada, Christian Serre, Alexandre Vimont, Jean-Claude Lavalley, Hervé Leclerc, Guillaume Clet, Marco Daturi, Phillip L. Llewellyn, Yaroslav Filinchuk and Gérard Férey
J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22, 10266-10273

Highly oriented surface-growth and covalent dye labeling of mesoporous metal–organic frameworks
Florian M. Hinterholzinger, Stefan Wuttke, Pascal Roy, Thomas Preuße, Andreas Schaate, Peter Behrens, Adelheid Godt and Thomas Bein
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 3899-3901

Structural flexibility and intrinsic dynamics in the M2(2,6-ndc)2(dabco) (M = Ni, Cu, Co, Zn) metal–organic frameworks
Nicole Klein, Herbert C. Hoffmann, Amandine Cadiau, Juergen Getzschmann, Martin R. Lohe, Silvia Paasch, Thomas Heydenreich, Karim Adil, Irena Senkovska, Eike Brunner and Stefan Kaskel
J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22, 10303-1031

MOF's Metal organic frameworks coordination polymersHydrogen adsorption in the metal–organic frameworks Fe2(dobdc) and Fe2(O2)(dobdc)
Wendy L. Queen, Eric D. Bloch, Craig M. Brown, Matthew R. Hudson, Jarad A. Mason, Leslie J. Murray, Anibal Javier Ramirez-Cuesta, Vanessa K. Peterson and Jeffrey R. Long
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 4180-4187

You might also be interested in the recent CrystEngComm Highlight

Coordination polymers, metal–organic frameworks and the need for terminology guidelines
Stuart R. Batten, Neil R. Champness, Xiao-Ming Chen, Javier Garcia-Martinez, Susumu Kitagawa, Lars Öhrström, Michael O’Keeffe, Myunghyun Paik Suh and Jan Reedijk
CrystEngComm, 2012, 14, 3001-3004

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Articles from around the world: Korea

This month we are highlighting some of the excellent articles published in Dalton Transactions from South Korea.

Click on the links below to download the articles…

A double-walled triangular metal-organic macrocycle based on a [Cu2(COO)4] square paddle-wheel secondary building unit
Xiaokai Song, Xinfang Liu, Minhak Oh and Myoung Soo Lah
Dalton. Trans., 2010, 39, 6178–6180

Preparation and characterisation of divalent hard and soft metal (M = Ca, Co, Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb) complexes of 1,10-dithia-18-crown-6: structural versatility
In-Hyeok Park, Ki-Min Park and Shim Sung Lee
Dalton Trans., 2010, 39, 9696–9704

Self-assembled molecular squares containing metal-based donor: synthesis and application in the sensing of nitro-aromatics
Vaishali Vajpayee, Hyunuk Kim, Anurag Mishra, Partha Sarathi Mukherjee, Peter J. Stang, Min Hyung Lee, Hwan Kyu Kim and Ki-Whan Chi
Dalton Trans., 2011,40, 3112–3115

Two-dimensional metal–organic frameworks with blue luminescence
Seong Huh, Suhyun Jung, Youngmee Kim, Sung-Jin Kim and Seongsoon Park
Dalton Trans., 2010, 39, 1261–1265

Canted antiferromagnetism and spin reorientation transition in layered inorganic–organic perovskite (C6H5CH2CH2NH3)2MnCl4
Seong-Hun Park, In-Hwan Oh, Sungil Park, Younbong Park, Ji Hyun Kim and Young-Duk Huh
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 1237–1242

Self-assembled metalla-bowls for selective sensing of multi-carboxylate anions
Anurag Mishra, Vaishali Vajpayee, Hyunuk Kim, Min Hyung Lee, Hyunji Jung, Ming Wang, Peter J. Stang and Ki-Whan Chi
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 1195–1201

Anion variation on a cobalt(III) complex of salen-type ligand tethered by four quaternary ammonium salts for CO2/epoxide copolymerization
Jina Yoo, Sung Jae Na, Hyeong Cheol Park, Anish Cyriac and Bun Yeoul Lee
Dalton Trans., 2010, 39, 2622–2630

Why not check out last year’s New Talent: Asia themed issue for more articles from Korea and beyond?

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N-heterocyclic carbenes themed issue – submissions open

Dalton Transactions is now welcoming submissions for a themed issue in N-heterocyclic carbenes, guest edited by Dr Catherine Cazin from the University of St Andrews.

Submission deadline: 28th November 2012

N-Heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) have become ubiquitous in coordination and organometallic chemistry and have had profound impact in homogeneous catalysis. This class of ligands has attracted significant attention during the last fifteen years, with hundreds of papers published every year, and four books dedicated to the topic. This Dalton Transactions themed issue will seek to highlight to the inorganic research community the latest and very best research in the field ranging from synthetic to applications-oriented contributions.

All article types will be considered – Communications, Full Papers, Frontiers and Perspectives. See our author guidelines for more information.

Click here to submit

Please note that inclusion in the themed issue will be subject to the guest editor’s discretion. All manuscripts will undergo peer-review in accordance with the Dalton Transactions mandate.

For enquiries, please contact the Editorial Office.

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Hydrogenase Hydrogel

The ability of hydrogenase enzymes to reversibly catalyse the reduction of protons to form molecular hydrogen (H2) has attracted a great deal of research interest. Synthetic mimics of the hydrogenase active site could potentially replace expensive platinum catalysts in hydrogen fuel cells. Currently these mimics are significantly less efficient than the natural enzyme and they are oxygen sensitive. It is thought that by creating a stable peptide based enviroment around the mimic, the stability and efficiency could be improved.

Encapsulating a hydrogenase mimic into a hydrogel causes a restriction in isomerisation after photolysis

Researchers from the Hunt and Ulijn groups at the University of Strathclyde and  the Pickett group from the University of East Anglia have successfully encapsulated a [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site mimic into a dipeptide based hydrogelator. Their research has shown that there is a stark difference in the behaviour of the active site mimic in the gel phase compared to the solution phase. Experiments show that the mimic is significantly more stable in the gel phase and is less senstive to water and UV light which could potentially help to improve catalytic activity.

To find out more, read the full Daltons Transactions article…

Encapsulating [FeFe]-hydrogenase model compounds in peptide hydrogels dramatically modifies stability and photochemistry
Pim Wilhelmus, Johannes Maria Frederix,  Rafal Kania,  Joseph A Wright ,  Dimitrios A Lamprou,  Rein Ulijn,  C J Pickett and Neil T Hunt.

This article is part of the upcoming Dalton Discussion themed issue on Inorganic Photophysics and Photochemistry – Fundamentals and Applications

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