Archive for the ‘Themed Issues’ Category

Call for papers: 2015 themed issues

Dalton Transactions coverWe are delighted to announce three new Dalton Transactions themed issues to be published in 2015:

Luminescent Complexes and Materials for Light-Emitting Devices
Guest Editor: Dr Eli Zysman-Colman (University of St. Andrews)
Deadline: 6th October 2014

Perovskites
Guest Editors: Professors Russell Morris, Philip Lightfoot (both University of St. Andrews) and J. Paul Attfield (The University of Edinburgh)
Deadline: 16th December 2014

Earth Abundant Element Compounds in Homogeneous Catalysis
Guest Editors: Professors Philip Mountford (University of Oxford), Laurel L. Schafer (University of British Columbia) and Warren E. Piers (University of Calgary) 
Deadline: 14th January 2015

Does your research fit into any of these subject areas? If so, we would welcome your contribution. For further details on issue scopes and on how to submit, see below:

How to submit

All types of manuscript – communications, full papers and Perspectives, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to normal peer review and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission which themed issue you would like to be considered for.

Issue scopes

Luminescent Complexes and Materials for Light-Emitting Devices
This themed issue will highlight the latest research in the field of luminescent complexes and materials for light-emitting devices. Suitable topics include the synthesis and fundamental photophysical studies of luminescent complexes as well as the fabrication and testing of devices which incorporate these materials. Contributions covering computational studies on relevant materials will also be appropriate.

Perovskites
This issue will focus on functional perovskites from the inorganic chemist’s perspective. It will include, but is not limited to: experimental studies on the synthesis, structure and physical/chemical properties of perovskites; chemistry-structure-property relationships; and the design and understanding of perovskite structure and functionality from a theoretical/computational perspective. Contributions are not limited to ‘classical’ inorganic perovskites but can also include hybrid perovskites, ‘MOF’ perovskites, layered perovskite families and related phases (eg. tungsten bronze types).

Earth Abundant Element Compounds in Homogeneous Catalysis
The aim of this themed issue is to showcase the latest research in the development of highly active and selective homogeneous catalysts utilizing earth abundant elements from across the Periodic Table. We believe this will reflect a recent trend in catalysis that seeks to find alternatives to catalysts based on precious metals like Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, or Au and toxic elements like Hg, Bi, In and Pb. We are inviting contributions from researchers utilizing catalysts based on elements from both the s and p block, the more abundant first row transition metals and the lanthanides as catalysts for commodity chemical, fine chemical and polymer synthesis, to emphasise the broad range of activity in this area

Are you interested in contributing? If so, submit your manuscript before the themed issue deadline(s)

 

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Call for papers: 2014 themed issues

DaltonTransCoverWe are delighted to announce that Dalton Transactions will be publishing a number of themed issues in 2014. We want you to submit your work. If your research fits within the following themed issue topics, read on…

New Expeditions in Polar Organometallic Chemistry – deadline 1st April 2014

Inorganic Chemistry for Renewable Energy Conversion and Storage  – deadline 1st May 2014

Spectroscopy of Inorganic Excited States – deadline 14th May 2014

 Details of the scope of each issue is below.

How to submit?
All types of manuscript—communications, full papers and Perspectives, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to the normal refereeing procedure and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission that you would like the manuscript to be considered for this themed issue.

Issue scopes:

New Expeditions in Polar Organometallic Chemistry
Guest edited by Professor Eva Hevia (University of Strathclyde), this issue will focus on both the synthesis and characterisation of polar organometallic reagents and their application in organic synthesis, catalysis, supramolecular chemistry and materials science.

Inorganic Chemistry for Renewable Energy Conversion and Storage
Guest edited by Professor Lars Kloo (KTH), this issue will focus on all aspects of inorganic/organometallic materials and coordination chemistry of relevance for the conversion and storage of renewable energy. Contributions may include solar cells, solar fuels, fuel cells, batteries, or materials for energy storage; however, this list is by no means exhaustive – all subject areas within the title theme will be welcome!

Spectroscopy of Inorganic Excited States
Guest edited by Dr Julia Weinstein (Universityof Sheffield), this issue will focus on the state-of-the art in spectroscopic interrogation of inorganic excited states which apply the latest advances in detection technology.

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Advancing the Chemistry of the f-Elements

Now welcoming abstract submissions for Dalton Discussion 14 – Advancing the Chemistry of the f-Elements

28th – 30th July 2014, Edinburgh, UK

Confirmed speakers: Geoff Cloke, University of Sussex, UK
  Melissa Denecke, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  Laurent Maron, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France
  Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley, USA
  Nik Kaltsoyannis, University College London, UK
  Marinella Mazzanti, CEA, Grenoble, France
  Paula Diaconescu, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  Jonathan Lloyd, University of Manchester, UK

This Dalton Discussion aims to highlight the burgeoning role, and exciting prospects for f-elements in modern, metal-based chemistry. Abstracts for oral presentations must be sent in before 16th December 2013.

Authors of the selected oral abstracts will then be expected to submit their work as a full paper, which will form the basis of their short presentation at the Discussion meeting. The paper itself must contain new, unpublished work and be submitted for review to the Editorial Office of Dalton Transactions by 30th June 2014. At the conference, each author will be given approximately 5 minutes to summarise the key points of their paper in order to leave the majority of time open for discussion

This year, Dalton Discussion 14 is adopting a new process. Papers presented at Dalton Discussions will continue to be published in a dedicated themed issue of Dalton Transactions, however article peer-review will now take place after the Discussion. This means that speakers have longer to make the finishing touches to their article before the papers are made available online prior to the meeting.

To find out more about Dalton Discussion 14 and to submit your abstract, visit the dedicated webpage.

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Call for papers: 2014 themed issues

Dalton TransactionsWe are delighted to announce that Dalton Transactions will be publishing a number of themed issues in 2014. We want you to submit your work. If your research fits within the following themed issue topics, read on…

Organometallic and Coordination Derivatives of Nanocarbons –deadline 1st December 2013

Layered Inorganic Solids–deadline 15th January 2014

Synergy between Experiment and Theory–deadline 29th January 2014

 

Details of the scope of each issue is below.

How to submit?
All types of manuscript—communications, full papers and Perspectives, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to the normal refereeing procedure and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission that you would like the manuscript to be considered for this themed issue.

Issue scopes:

Organometallic and Coordination Derivatives of Nanocarbons
Guest edited by Professors Andrei Khlobystov and Andreas Hirsch, this issue focuses on the nanoscience and nanotechnology of inorganic and organometallic nanomaterials, including synthesis, structural and functional characterisation, and theory.

Layered Inorganic Solids
Guest edited by Professors Russell Morris, Jiri Cejka, Petr Nachtigall and Wieslaw Roth, this issue focuses on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the chemistry of layered materials.

Synergy between Experiment and Theory
Guest edited by Professor Eric Clot, this issue highlights the benefit of using simultaneous experimental and computational approaches to address a particular problem in inorganic or organometallic chemistry.

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Highlights from the upcoming Coordination Programming themed issue

We will shortly be publishing a themed issue titled “Coordination Programming: Science of Molecular Superstructures towards Chemical Devices” in Dalton Transactions. As a taster of what is coming, the following is a selection of articles from the issue that is recommended as HOT by our referees.


Relative anion binding affinity in a series of interpenetrated coordination cages
Marina Frank, Johannes M. Dieterich, Sabrina Freye, Ricardo A. Mata and Guido H. Clever

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51709H, Communication

Relative anion binding affinity in a series of interpenetrated coordination cages


Guest responsivity of a two-dimensional coordination polymer incorporating a cholesterol-based co-ligand
Kazuki Kajitani, Tomomi Koshiyama, Akihiro Hori, Ryo Ohtani, Akio Mishima, Kohei Torikai, Makoto Ebine, Tohru Oishi, Masaki Takata, Susumu Kitagawa and Masaaki Ohba

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51465J, Communication

Guest Responsivity of a Two-Dimensional Coordination Polymer Incorporating a Cholesterol-Based Co-Ligand


Programmed multiple complexation for the creation of helical structures from acyclic phenol–bipyridine oligomer ligands
Shigehisa Akine, Hiroki Nagumo and Tatsuya Nabeshima

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51240A, Paper

Programmed multiple=


Plasmon-induced oxidation of gold nanoparticles on TiO2 in the presence of ligands
Yohei Konishi, Ichiro Tanabe and Tetsu Tatsuma

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51495A, Paper

Plasmon-induced oxidation of gold nanoparticles on TiO2 in the presence of ligands


Programming MOFs for water sorption: amino-functionalized MIL-125 and UiO-66 for heat transformation and heat storage applications
Felix Jeremias, Vasile Lozan, Stefan K. Henninger and Christoph Janiak

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51471D, Paper

Programming MOFs for water sorption: Amino-functionalized MIL-125 and UiO-66 for heat transformation and heat storage applications


Ternary metal Prussian blue analogue nanoparticles as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries
Masashi Okubo and Itaru Honma

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51369F, Communication

Ternary metal Prussian blue analogue nanoparticles as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries


A bis(terpyridine)iron network polymer on carbon for a potential energy storage material
Kuo-Hui Wu, Hiroaki Maeda, Tetsuya Kambe, Ken Hoshiko, Eunice Jia Han Phua, Ryota Sakamoto and Hiroshi Nishihara

Dalton Trans., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51186C, Communication

A bis(terpyridine)iron network polymer on carbon for a potential energy storage material

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Dalton Discussion 14 – Advancing the chemistry of actinides

Now welcoming abstract submissions for Dalton Discussion 14 – Advancing the Chemistry of Actinides

16th–18th September 2013, Edinburgh, UK

Confirmed speakers: Geoff Cloke, University of Sussex, UK
  Melissa Denecke, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  Laurent Maron, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France
  Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley, USA
  Nik Kaltsoyannis, University College London, UK
  Marinella Mazzanti, CEA, Grenoble, France
  Paula Diaconescu, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  Jonathan Lloyd, University of Manchester, UK

This Dalton Discussion aims to highlight the burgeoning role, and exciting prospects for actinides in modern, metal-based chemistry. Abstracts for oral presentations must be sent in before 15th February 2013.

Authors of the selected oral abstracts will then be expected to submit their work as a full paper, which will form the basis of their short presentation at the Discussion meeting. The paper itself must contain new, unpublished work and be submitted for review to the Editorial Office of Dalton Transactions by 16th August 2013. At the conference, each author will be given approximately 5 minutes to summarise the key points of their paper in order to leave the majority of time open for discussion

This year, Dalton Discussion 14 is adopting a new process. Papers presented at Dalton Discussions will continue to be published in a dedicated themed issue of Dalton Transactions, however article peer-review will now take place after the Discussion. This means that speakers have longer to make the finishing touches to their article before the papers are made available online prior to the meeting.

To find out more about Dalton Discussion 14 and to submit your abstract, visit the dedicated RSC webpage.

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Studying hydrogen activation of FLPs

Scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have investigated the mechanism of heterolytic H2 activation by frustrated lewis pairs (FLPs). To do this, they employed an unique approach of solution calorimetry and were able to obtain the enthalpies and relative rates of H2 activation.

With the exception of previous studies that partly relied on theoretical calculations, there has not been a great deal of work devoted to understanding how molecular hydrogen is activated by FLPs. Autrey and colleagues have found that H2 activation rates using such species are relatively fast considering no metals are involved. They discovered that the rate was dependent on the structure of the Lewis basic amine involved, and that diffusion of hydrogen across the gas-liquid interface is not rate limiting.

Further work is needed to extract fundamental rate constants, kinetic orders, and activation barriers, say the researchers.

Read the article now to find out more…
A thermodynamic and kinetic study of the heterolytic activation of hydrogen by frustrated borane–amine Lewis pairs
Abhi Karkamkar, Kshitij Parab, Donald M. Camaioni, Doinita Neiner, Herman Cho, Thomas K. Nielsen and Tom Autrey

This article is part of an upcoming themed issue on Boranes and Borohydrides, guest edited by Simon Aldridge. Other articles by this author include:

Methods to stabilize and destabilize ammonium borohydride
Thomas K. Nielsen, Abhi Karkamkar, Mark Bowden, Flemming Besenbacher, Torben R. Jensen and Tom Autrey

Also of interest… Take a look at our recent themed issue in Frustrated Lewis Pairs

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No stone left unturned at Dalton Discussion 13

This year’s Dalton Discussion meeting was based at the University of Sheffield and focused on the topic of Inorganic Photophysics and Photochemistry – Fundamentals and Applications.

The 3 day programme was rich with contributions from Keynote speakers, Richard Eisenberg, Majed Chergui, Peter Ford and Luisa De Cola; Invited speakers, Craig Hill, David Parker, and Chantal Daniel; amongst numerous other excellent presenations from researchers across the international community.

 Majed Chergui and Andrea Barbieri  Richard Eisenberg  Craig Hill


The Dalton Discussion format differs slightly from other conferences in that speakers are alloted short 5-10 minute slots to deliver a snappy overview of their latest research based on the contents of their article which will shortly be published in a themed issue of Dalton Transactions.

For every 3 presentations, there follows an hour long discussion amongst the delegates – an excellent opportunity for researchers to get down to the gritty detail of the experiments, understand any tricky concepts, and offer alternative ideas to take the research forward. It was great to see even the graduate students asking questions – something that is sadly, rarely seen at conferences.

 

The poster sessions were also of great success. Many congratulations to Sven Hansen, Elizabeth Bagaley and Lucy Jones who won the Dalton Transactions, ChemComm and RSC Books poster prizes, respectively. 

DD13 Poster Prize winners
Otto Horvath in conversation with Peter Burks, student of Peter Ford at UCSB From left to right: Lucy Jones (University of Manchester), Sven Hansen (Rostock University), Elizabeth Baggaley (University of Sheffield). No conference is complete without networking at the welcome reception

 

I am already very much looking forward to what next year’s Dalton Discussion meeting has to offer – which will be adopting a new and improved format for article submission. Watch this space…

Many thanks go to Mike Ward for providing photographs and also for organising such an excellent meeting! 

Also of interest…
See here for the RSC’s report on Solar Fuels and Artificial Photosynthesis: Science and innovation to change our future energy options

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Stronger crystal field interactions give actinides advantage over lanthanides in single-molecule magnet construction at high temperatures.

Slow magnetic relaxation in homoleptic trispyrazolylborate complexes of neodymium(III) and uranium(III)Jeffrey Rinehart and Jeffrey Long compare the dynamic properties of the 4f3 complex, NdTp3 (Tp- = trispyrazolylborate), and its isostructural 5f3 congener, UTp3. This is the first direct comparison of slow magnetic relaxation behaviour for isostructural and valence isoelectronic lanthanide and actinide complexes.

Download the manuscript which is free to access for 4 weeks to find out more.

Slow magnetic relaxation in homoleptic trispyrazolylborate complexes of neodymium(III) and uranium(III)
Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31352A, Communication

This manuscript is part of a themed issue titled Frontier and Perspectives in Molecule-Based Quantum Magnets which is due to be published later in the year. Below is a selection of papers also due to be included in this themed issue:

Single-ion magnet behaviour in [U(TpMe2)2I]
Joana T. Coutinho,  Maria A. Antunes,  Laura C. J. Pereira,  Hélène Bolvin,  Joaquim Marçalo,  Marinella Mazzanti and Manuel Almeida
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31421E, Communication

Controlling magnetic communication through aromatic bridges by variation in torsion angle
Thomas B. Faust,  Floriana Tuna,  Grigore A. Timco,  Marco Affronte,  Valerio Bellini,  Wolfgang Wernsdorfer and Richard E. P. Winpenny
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31292A, Paper

A oximato-bridged linear trinuclear [MnIVMnIIIMnIV] single-molecule magnet
Chang-Long Zhou,  Zhe-Ming Wang,  Bing-Wu Wang and Song Gao
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31039B, Paper

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Frustrated Lewis pairs themed issue now published

We strongly recommend you have a browse of Dalton Transactions’ latest themed issue in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

As Guest Editor, Doug Stephan says in his Editorial: there’s nothing frustrating about frustrated Lewis pairs! Particularly as these highly reactive compounds are gaining increasing attention from researchers wishing to activate dihydrogen, olefins, disulfides, CO2… the list continues…

The issue contains 18 articles dedicated to the topic – a small selection is below:

Hydrogen activation by 2-boryl-N,N-dialkylanilines: a revision of Piers’ ansa-aminoborane
Konstantin Chernichenko, Martin Nieger, Markku Leskelä and Timo Repo

Frustrated Lewis pair addition to conjugated diynes: Formation of zwitterionic 1,2,3-butatriene derivatives
Philipp Feldhaus, Birgitta Schirmer, Birgit Wibbeling, Constantin G. Daniliuc, Roland Fröhlich, Stefan Grimme, Gerald Kehr and Gerhard Erker

Fixation of carbon dioxide and related small molecules by a bifunctional frustrated pyrazolylborane Lewis pair
Eileen Theuergarten, Janin Schlösser, Danny Schlüns, Matthias Freytag, Constantin G. Daniliuc, Peter G. Jones and Matthias Tamm

Access the issue here

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