Archive for the ‘Reviews’ Category

Perspective: Suning Wang on triarylboron compounds for optoelectronics

Suning Wang from Queen’s University, Canada, looks at how electron accepting triarylboranes can be used in optoelectronic applications in this Dalton Transactions Perspective article.

Wang and her PhD student, Zachary Hudson, discuss the role of boron, and the photophysical properties of metal-containing triarylboranes. They go on to review the recent research, looking at triarylboron-containing complexes in OLEDs and as anion sensors, as well their use in MOFs, zinc sensors and as vapochromic materials to detect VOCs.

Read the full article to find out more…

Metal-containing triarylboron compounds for optoelectronic applications
Zachary M. Hudson and Suning Wang
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 7805-7816
DOI: 10.1039/C1DT10292C

Professor Wang is an Associate Editor for our new journal, RSC Advances, read more about her research.

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The Future of MOFs?

Neil Champness

We all know that MOFs are everywhere now but where are they going? Neil Champness provides us with his expert point of view on the future of metal-organic frameworks  in his recently published Dalton Transactions Frontier article. Find out where the challenges currently lie and the opportunities on the horizon for these hot hot compounds.

You can even download and read Neil’s exciting Frontier for free until the 4th October! Just click on the article title below:
The future of metal–organic frameworks
Neil R. Champness  
Dalton Trans., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1DT11184A

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Getting the lead in!

Getting the lead (Pb that is) into radiotherapeutics! In their Dalton Transactions Perspective article Martin Brechbiel and Kwon Yong tell us how lead can be used to target and kill tumour cells. They discuss recent uses and strategies for 212Pb as a potential radiotherapeutic and discusses pre-clinical trials, with an emphasis on the development of 212Pb towards clinical translation.

READ THE REVIEW: Towards translation of 212Pb as a clinical therapeutic; getting the lead in!
Kwon Yong and Martin W. Brechbiel
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 6068-6076   DOI: 10.1039/C0DT01387K

This article is part of the themed issue: Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging and therapy – investigate this issue here!

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Morphology-dependent nanocatalysis

The rapid development of materials science now enables tailoring of metal and metal oxide particles with tunable size and shape at the nanometre level. As a result, nanocatalysis is undergoing an explosive growth, and it has been seen that the size and shape of a catalyst particle tremendously affects the reaction performance.

Wenjie Shen and colleagues recently surveyed the recent progress on morphology-dependent nanocatalysis of precious metal particles to emphasise the chemical nature of the morphology effect. Get up to speed fast on this rapidly growing field now by reading their Perspective article!

Morphology-dependent nanocatalysis: metal particles
Yong Li, Qiying Liu and Wenjie Shen
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 5811-5826 DOI: 10.1039/C0DT01404D

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Hot Review Article: Claude Piguet looks at self assembly

This Perspective article by Claude Piguet has been selected as a Dalton Transactions Hot article, where the current understanding of the role of energy in self assembly is explained.

Claude Piguet looks at intermolecular interactions in pure materials and diluted solutions, and the thermodynamic considerations behind enthalpy-entropy compensation.

As the author comments, this field is very important as ‘a thorough understanding of the underlying intermolecular connection of an effector to a receptor could be at the origin of some novel design for drugs…’

Professor Piguet is based at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, find out more about his research by visiting his website.

Read the full review for FREE for one month…

Enthalpy–entropy correlations as chemical guides to unravel self-assembly processes
Claude Piguet
Dalton Trans., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1DT10055F

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Perspective: Ann Valentine reviews the bioinorganic chemistry of sea squirts

This week’s issue of Dalton Transactions contains an excellent review from Ann Valentine, of Yale University.

Her perspective article focuses on the how the ascidians, which are marine invertebrates commonly known as sea squirts, control how metals like vanadium, titanium and iron react in water.

The sea squirts are amazing creatures that have an unparalleled ability to keep high concentrations of vanadium in their cells, and are an excellent way of studying biological control over inorganic coordination chemistry.

Read the full review to find out more about these fascinating organisms…

The challenges of trafficking hydrolysis prone metals and ascidians as an archetype
Jean P. Gaffney and Ann M. Valentine
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 5827-5835

Want to know more about sea squirts? Look at the Encyclopedia of Marine Life of Britain and Ireland.

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Perspective: Multi-functional magnets with Prussian blue analogs

In this Dalton Transactions Perspective, Shin-ichi Ohkoshi and Hiroko Tokoro discuss cyano-bridged bimetal assemblies (particularly Prussian blue analogs) that demonstrate novel magnetic functionalities.  Charge-transfer phase transitions, reversible photomagnetism, second harmonic generation along with magnetization-induced second harmonic generation, ferroelectric ferromagnetism, humidity-sensitive magnetism, high ionic conductivity, and a coupling effect (termed spin-ionics) between ionic conduction and magnetic ordering within Prussian blue analogs is described.

Prussian blue analogs have been intensively studied due to (i) their flexible structure, which meet conditions for charge-transfer, photoinduced change, and absorption and desorption of water, and (ii) the strong exchange coupling of the magnetic centers through cyano-bridged ligands.

To find out more about this fascinating area, read for free until 29th April here.

Novel magnetic functionalities of Prussian blue analogs
Hiroko Tokoro and Shin-ichi Ohkoshi
Dalton Trans., 2011, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C0DT01829E

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Dalton Transactions issue 14

Dalton Transactions issue 14 is now available online

The outside cover article features a Perspective by Mahdi M. Abu-Omar and descibes how manganese(V) imido complexes of 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (H3tpfc) can be prepared by the reaction of MnIII(tpfc) and organic nitrene generated from either photolytic or thermal activation of organic azides.

Read more about the cover article at:
High-valent iron and manganese complexes of corrole and porphyrin in atom transfer and dioxygen evolving catalysis.
Mahdi M. Abu-Omar
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 3435-3444
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT01341B, Perspective

The inside cover features research by the Braunschweig group in Germany on the reactivity of a platinum-substituted borirene.

For the full story read in more depth at:
Reactivity of a platinum-substituted borirene
Holger Braunschweig, Qing Ye, Krzystof Radacki and Thomas Kupfer
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 3666-3670
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT01694B

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Perspective: Microwave synthesis of MOFs

Microwave synthesis of MOFs

Microwave heating used in organic chemistry for decades has only recently been applied to Metal–Organic Frameworks (MOF). 
 
In this Dalton Transactions Perspective, Klinowski and co-workers clearly describe the advantages of using microwave synthesis to prepare a range of coordination network materials: short reaction times, fast kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth, and high yields of desirable products which can be isolated with few or no secondary products.  The growth of nano-sized crystallites which may find direct applications in functional devices is highlighted.

Read more at:

Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Metal–Organic Frameworks  Jacek Klinowski, Filipe A. Almeida Paz, Patrícia Silva and João Rocha
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 321-330
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT00708K, Perspective

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Perspective: Conversions between metal–ligand multiple bond types

In this Dalton Transactions Perspective, Aaron Odom from Michigan State University examines single-step methods for the conversion of one type of metal-ligand multiple bond to another. These reactions have a wide variety of applications in organic synthesis, e.g. in carbonyl olefination.

The Perspective includes recent examples from the author’s own laboratory on metallacycles prepared directly from an imido ligand.

Read more: Conversions between metal-ligand multiple bond (MLMB) types: carbonyl olefination and other applications
Aaron L. Odom
Dalton Trans., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT00825G, Perspective

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