Archive for the ‘Reviews’ Category

Top Inorganic Chemistry reviews of 2017!

It is that time again when we take a look back at the work published in the previous year and how it is being received by the Inorganic Chemistry community. These Perspective and Frontier articles are among our top cited and downloaded review articles of 2017 providing valuable insight into the latest advances and trends for the community.

The full list of Perspective and Frontier articles published in 2017 can be found here.

Luminescent rare-earth-based MOFs as optical sensors

Partha Mahata, Sudip Kumar Mondal, Debal Kanti Singha and Prakash Majee

Dalton Trans., 2017,46, 301-328

This perspective article highlights the basics and applications of luminescence-based sensing of hazardous chemicals, pH, and temperature using rare-earth-based metal–organic frameworks.

Functional metallosupramolecular architectures using 1,2,3-triazole ligands: it’s as easy as 1,2,3 “click”

Roan A. S. Vasdev, Dan Preston and James D. Crowley

Dalton Trans., 2017,46, 2402-2414

Self-assembled metallosupramolecular architectures generated using “click” ligands have become an increasingly popular area of inorganic chemistry.

Alkynyl-protected gold and gold–silver nanoclusters  

Zhen Lei, Xian-Kai Wan, Shang-Fu Yuan, Jia-Qi Wang and Quan-Ming Wang

Dalton Trans., 2017,46, 3427-3434

Alkynyl-protected coinage metal nanoclusters show new structural features and have interesting luminescence properties and catalytic behavior.

Copper(I)–NHC complexes as NHC transfer agents

Fady Nahra, Alberto Gómez-Herrera and Catherine S. J. Cazin

Dalton Trans., 2017,46, 628-631

The latest advances involving the use of copper(I)–NHC complexes as NHC transfer agents are described.

Generalization of the Tolman electronic parameter: the metal–ligand electronic parameter and the intrinsic strength of the metal–ligand bond

Dieter Cremer and Elfi Kraka

Dalton Trans., 2017,46, 8323-8338

Dieter Cremer and Elfi Kraka

The MLEP is a new, generally applicable measure of the metal–ligand bond strength based on vibrational spectroscopy, replacing the TEP.

 

β-Diketiminate complexes of the first row transition metals: applications in catalysis

R.L. Webster

Dalton Trans., 2017,46, 4483-4498

Although β-diketiminate complexes have been widely explored in stoichiometric studies, their use as catalysts is largely underdeveloped.

 

 

These articles are free to view until 15th February 2018

Submit your research or reviews to Dalton Transactions– see our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Perspectives and Frontiers by RSC award winners

We are delighted to present a selection of recently-published Dalton Transactions Perspective and Frontier articles by recent winners of Royal Society of Chemistry awards.

Adrian Chaplin

Dr Adrian Chaplin: 2015 Harrison-Meldola Memorial Prize winner

NHC-based pincer ligands: carbenes with a bite
Rhiann E. Andrew, Lucero González-Sebastián and Adrian B. Chaplin
Dalton Trans., 2016, 45, 1299
DOI:10.1039/C5DT04429D

In this frontier article we overview the emergence and scope of NHC-based CCC and CNC pincer systems, i.e. complexes containing mer-tridentate ligands bearing two NHC donor groups, comment on their effectiveness in applications, and highlight areas for future development and exploitation.

graphical abstract



Paul Dyson

Professor Paul Dyson: 2015 Bioinorganic Chemistry Award winner

Metal-based drugs that break the rules
Claire S. Allardyce and Paul J. Dyson*
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03919C

Cisplatin and other platinum compounds have had a huge impact in the treatment of cancers and are applied in the majority of anticancer chemotherapeutic regimens. The success of these compounds has biased the approaches used to discover new metal-based anticancer drugs. In this perspective we highlight compounds that are apparently incompatible with the more classical (platinum-derived) concepts employed in the development of metal-based anticancer drugs, with respect to both compound design and the approaches used to validate their utility. Possible design approaches for the future are also suggested.

graphical abstract



Dr Kogularamanan Suntharalingam

Dr Kogularamanan Suntharalingam: Dalton Young Researchers Award 2014 Winner

Advances in cobalt complexes as anticancer agents
Catherine R. Munteanu and Kogularamanan Suntharalingam*
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 13796-13808
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02101D

The evolution of resistance to traditional platinum-based anticancer drugs has compelled researchers to investigate the cytostatic properties of alternative transition metal-based compounds. The anticancer potential of cobalt complexes has been extensively studied over the last three decades, and much time has been devoted to understanding their mechanisms of action. This perspective catalogues the development of antiproliferative cobalt complexes, and provides an in depth analysis of their mode of action.

graphical abstract


We will continue you update this blog post as more articles are published.

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Turning natural cofactors into new anti-proliferative agents

Peptide B12: emerging trends at the interface of inorganic chemistry, chemical biology and medicineVitamin B12 plays an important role in the metabolism of many organisms, particularly mammals.  Since efficient delivery of vitamin B12 into cells has potential applications in medical therapies, Zelder et al. are sure to inspire wider interest in the design, chemistry and biology of backbone modified B12 derivatives with this hot Perspective.

Download the Perspective today for free

Peptide B12: emerging trends at the interface of inorganic chemistry, chemical biology and medicine
Felix Zelder, Kai Zhou and Marjorie Sonnay
Dalton Trans., 2013
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT32005C

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Inspiring inorganic chemists to make their mark in medicine

Declan Gaynor and Darren Griffith discuss how medicinal inorganic chemistry is currently flourishing in this Dalton Transactions Perspective.  Understanding the role of metals in biological systems is very important for drug design; the predictability and control of inorganic complexes make fine-tuning the properties of drugs incorporating such complexes a real possibility.  Metal-based compounds are already routinely administered on a regular basis and this Perspective encourages chemists to further investigate inorganic therapeutic and diagnostic medicine by looking at previous successes, e.g. MRI contrast agents, then moving onto current challenges such as antibacterial compounds for tackling hospital acquired infections.Key areas of applied medicinal inorganic chemistryKey areas of applied medicinal inorganic chemistry

To find out more, you can download the Perspective now – which is free to access for 4 weeks!

The prevalence of metal-based drugs as therapeutic or diagnostic agents: beyond platinum
Declan Gaynor and Darren M. Griffith
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31601C, Perspective

Also of interest…

Mn(II) complexes of novel hexadentate AAZTA-like chelators: a solution thermodynamics and relaxometric study
Lorenzo Tei, Giuseppe Gugliotta, Marianna Fekete, Ferenc K. Kálmán and Mauro Botta
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 2025-2032
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT01114B, Paper

Metallic radionuclides in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals
Sibaprasad Bhattacharyya and Manish Dixit
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 6112-6128
DOI: 10.1039/C1DT10379B, Perspective
From themed issue Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging and therapy

The status of platinum anticancer drugs in the clinic and in clinical trials
Nial J. Wheate, Shonagh Walker, Gemma E. Craig and Rabbab Oun
Dalton Trans., 2010, 39, 8113-8127
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT00292E, Perspective

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Hot Perspective: Treating Wilsons Disease

Wilson’s disease is a rare genetic condition caused by inheriting an abnormal copy of the Wilson disease protein (ATP7B) gene. The disease affects approximately 1-4 people per 100,000 and prevents sufferers from regulating the concentration of copper within their body, inducing a copper overload.

The redox properties of copper make it a very important metal biologically and it is involved in a wide range of enzymatic processes. The anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase for example is expressed in all cells and is part of our anti-oxidant defence, while the more specialised dopamine β-hydroxylase is only expressed in the brain and is involved in dopamine conversion. Balancing the amount of copper we have in our bodies is crucial for good health, having a copper deficit would hinder vital functions, but having an excess can cause oxidative stress by promoting the formation of hydroxyl radicals.

Designing new drugs to treat Wilson’s disease which can be targeted to the liver, where excess copper is found

Treating Wilson’s disease involves life-long chelation therapy, this is the application of compounds designed to bind to the excess copper ions and allow them to be safely excreted. This Hot Perspective by Pascale Delangle and Elisabeth Mintz reviews the drugs currently in use and gives insight in to the development of more advanced treatments, highlighting the design of bio-inspired chelating agents and drug targeting.

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To find out more you can download this article now, which is free to access for 4 weeks!
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Chelation therapy in Wilson’s disease: from D-penicillamine to the design of selective bioinspired intracellular Cu(I) chelators
Pascale Delangle and Elisabeth Mintz
Dalton Trans., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12188C

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Porphyrinic MOFs

If you’re interested in finding out more about MOFs, and in particular those based on metalloporphyrins, then look no further… Chao Zou and Chuan-De Wu’s recent Perspective article provides an interesting overview of these functional materials. The researchers from Zhejiang University, China, discuss synthetic strategies and applications ranging from hydrogen storage to photocatalysis. Although the application of porphyrinic MOFs is considerably underdeveloped compared to other porphyrinic materials, say Zou and Wu, this article demonstrates that metalloporphyrins are an ideal choice for designing crystalline solid frameworks.

To read more, download the article now – it’s free to access.
Functional porphyrinic metal–organic frameworks: crystal engineering and applications

This Perspective article is part of the upcoming themed issue on Coordination Chemistry in the Solid State, guest edited by Dalton Transactions Associate Editor, Russell Morris. Keep your eyes peeled for many of our other coordination chemistry articles which have already been published, including Burnett and Choe’s Perspective article on “Sequential self-assembly in metal–organic frameworks”.

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Hot Frontier: Pharmaceutical potential of selenium and tellurium compounds

Edward Tiekink is based at the University of Malaya

Edward Tiekink gives us a concise overview of drug developments involving selenium and tellurium compounds in this Dalton Transactions Frontier.

Download it today, whilst it is still free….

Therapeutic potential of selenium and tellurium compounds: Opportunities yet unrealised
Edward R. T. Tiekink
Dalton Trans., 2012
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12225A

Why not take a look at some of Edward Tiekink’s other recent articles:

The metal–carbonyl···π(aryl) interaction as a supramolecular synthon for the stabilisation of transition metal carbonyl crystal structures
Julio Zukerman-Schpector, Ionel Haiduc and Edward R.T. Tiekink
Chem. Commun., 2011, 47, 12682-12684
DOI: 10.1039/C1CC15579B, Communication

Interwoven coordination polymers sustained by tautomeric forms of the bridging ligand
Pavel Poplaukhin and Edward R. T. Tiekink
CrystEngComm, 2010, 12, 1302-1306
DOI: 10.1039/B916585A, Paper

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Metal complexes as biomolecular probes

Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo

The rich photophysical properties of luminescent inorganic and organometallic transition metal complexes, such as their intense, long-lived, and environment-sensitive emission, make them excellent candidates for biological and cellular probes. In this Dalton Transactions Perspective, Ken Lo and colleagues review examples of biological probes derived from luminescent transition metal complexes with a d6, d8, or d10 metal center.  Also discussed is the possible use of luminescent transition metal complexes as photodynamic therapeutics for various diseases or even light-activated drug release moelcules.

Applications of luminescent inorganic and organometallic transition metal complexes as biomolecular and cellular probes
Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo, Alex Wing-Tat Choi and Wendell Ho-Tin Law
Dalton Trans., 2012, DOI: 10.1039/C2DT11892

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First came Pacman, then Ms. Pacman and now Diamido Pacman!?

Multi-dentate amido ligands are a real area of interest in coordination chemistry, the transition metal complexes possess novel reactivities, interesting structures and a range of properties including magnetism. Diamido-donor ligands for a large number of diamagnetic metal centres have been well studied, but the paramagnetic complexes have been relatively unexplored. Daniel B. Leznoff and Cassandra E. Hayes have compiled a review of these interesting structures in their Dalton Transactions Perspective ‘Paramagnetic metal complexes of diamido donor ligands‘, highlighting the broad scope of research yet to be undertaken. Who knows where the next fruit will appear in this unexplored maze?

Paramagnetic metal complexes of diamido donor ligands
Cassandra E. Hayes and Daniel B. Leznoff
Dalton Trans., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1DT11559F

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Hot Perspective: Shedding light on the oxygen-evolving-complex

Can we mimic the Photosystem II machinery for light-driven oxidation of water to molecular oxygen?

Can we mimic the Photosystem II machinery for light-driven oxidation of water to molecular oxygen?

In this Dalton Transactions Perspective, Philipp Kurz and colleagues discuss manganese-containing compounds that have been studied as potential analogues of the oxygen-evolving-complex in Photosystem II.  They highlight how the desire to produce solar fuels is inspiring research into artificial photosynthesis.

Read more for free until 29th November at:

Water oxidation catalysed by manganese compounds: from complexes to ‘biomimetic rocks’
Mathias Wiechen, Hans-Martin Berends and Philipp Kurz
Dalton Trans., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1DT11537E, Perspective

You might also find these Dalton Trans. articles on biomimetic water-oxidation catalysis interesting…

Nano-size amorphous calcium–manganese oxide as an efficient and biomimetic water oxidizing catalyst for artificial photosynthesis: back to manganese
Mohammad Mahdi Najafpour, Sara Nayeri and Babak Pashaei
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 9374-9378
DOI: 10.1039/C1DT11048A

High turnover catalysis of water oxidation by Mn(II) complexes of monoanionic pentadentate ligands
Rune Kirk Seidler-Egdal, Anne Nielsen, Andrew D. Bond, Morten J. Bjerrum and Christine J. McKenzie
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 3849-3858
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT01340D

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