Archive for the ‘News’ Category

End of year HOT articles!

December 2015’s HOT articles are here and free to access. These have also been compiled into a collection on our website.

Switching the orientation of Jahn–Teller axes in oxime-based MnIII dimers and its effect upon magnetic exchange: a combined experimental and theoretical study
Priyanka Comar, Thayalan Rajeshkumar, Gary S. Nichol, Mateusz B. Pitak, Simon J. Coles, Gopalan Rajaraman and Euan K. Brechin
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 19805-19811
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03615A

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Coordination chemistry of 2,2′-biphenylenedithiophosphinate and diphenyldithiophosphinate with U, Np, and Pu
Joseph A. Macor, Jessie L. Brown, Justin N. Cross, Scott R. Daly, Andrew J. Gaunt, Gregory S. Girolami, Michael T. Janicke, Stosh A. Kozimor, Mary P. Neu, Angela C. Olson, Sean D. Reilly and Brian L. Scott
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 18923-18936
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02976G

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Mechanistic features of the copper-free Sonogashira reaction from ESI-MS
Zohrab Ahmadi, Lars P. E. Yunker, Allen G. Oliver and J. Scott McIndoe
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 20367-20375
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02889B

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


First structural characterization of Pa(IV) in aqueous solution and quantum chemical investigations of the tetravalent actinides up to Bk(IV): the evidence of a curium break
Nidhu lal Banik, Valérie Vallet, Florent Réal, Réda Mohamed Belmecheri, Bernd Schimmelpfennig, Jörg Rothe, Rémi Marsac, Patric Lindqvist-Reis, Clemens Walther, Melissa A. Denecke and Christian M. Marquardt
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03560K

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Compositional dependence of anomalous thermal expansion in perovskite-like ABX3 formates
Ines E. Collings, Joshua A. Hill, Andrew B. Cairns, Richard I. Cooper, Amber L. Thompson, Julia E. Parker, Chiu C. Tang and Andrew L. Goodwin
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03263F

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Modular solid-phase synthesis, catalytic application and efficient recycling of supported phosphine–phosphite ligand libraries
Frank J. L. Heutz and Paul C. J. Kamer
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03226A

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Synthesis and controlled growth of osmium nanoparticles by electron irradiation
Anaïs Pitto-Barry, Luis M. A. Perdigao, Marc Walker, James Lawrence, Giovanni Costantini, Peter J. Sadler and Nicolas P. E. Barry
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 20308-20311
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03205A

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Palladium(II) complexes featuring a mixed phosphine–pyridine–iminophosphorane pincer ligand: synthesis and reactivity
Thibault Cheisson and Audrey Auffrant
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02789F

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Explaining the mechanical mechanisms of zeolitic metal–organic frameworks: revealing auxeticity and anomalous elasticity
Matthew. R. Ryder and Jin-Chong Tan
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03514G

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


The structures of CyMe4-BTBP complexes of americium(III) and europium(III) in solvents used in solvent extraction, explaining their separation properties
Christian Ekberg, Elin Löfström-Engdahl, Emma Aneheim, Mark R. StJ. Foreman, Andreas Geist, Daniel Lundberg, Melissa Denecke and Ingmar Persson
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 18395-18402
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02859K

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Stepwise assembly of mixed-metal coordination cages containing both kinetically inert and kinetically labile metal ions: introduction of metal-centred redox and photophysical activity at specific sites
Ashley B. Wragg, Alexander J. Metherell, William Cullen and Michael D. Ward
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 17939-17949
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02957K

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Tin sulfide and selenide clusters soluble in organic solvents with the core structures of Sn4S6 and Sn4Se6
Mingdong Zhong, Zhi Yang, Yafei Yi, Dongxiang Zhang, Kening Sun, Herbert W. Roesky and Ying Yang
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 19800-19804
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03244J

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015

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Adjusting the Pincer Pinch

Professor Darrin Richeson’s group has carved out an interesting organometallic niche. Their papers feature low-valent metal complexes of pincer ligands combined with detailed computational analysis of the electronic structures. In their recent Dalton Transactions article they report unique coinage metal complexes of the “PN3P” ligand below.

This "PN3P" ligand

The judicious selection of this particular pincer framework resulted in complexes with geometric properties distinct from those of the same metals with other “PNP”-type ligands. Choosing the ligand with a NR instead of a NH spacer between the pyridine and phosphine moieties enhances the donor strength of the phosphines while rendering the N atoms inert towards deprotonation.

Subtle effects of this adjustment manifest themselves in dramatic changes in the solid-state coordination and geometric properties of their Cu and Ag complexes. Their reported CuBr complex is coordinated by one PN3P ligand and has a distorted trigonal pyramidal geometry. They contrast these to Cu(I) complexes of an analogous PN3P ligand with NH spacers, which coordinate two ligands and in one case displace the halide atom. Using CH2 spacers, a previously reported Cu(I) structure exhibits T-shaped geometry and a non-coordinating triflate anion. The Cu(I) reported here shows a geometry much closer to trigonal pyramidal, with a coordinating triflate anion.

The second part of the paper discusses details of the electronic structure gleaned from DFT calculations. Particularly illuminating is a paragraph on page 19157, summarizing the particulars of the bonding as “a balance of bonding and antibonding interactions…diffuse polarized-π orbitals…(and) back donation.” Perhaps this seems summary seems unsurprising, but there are subtleties in the analysis.

Professor Richeson was my M.Sc. supervisor (I finished in his group six years ago). I write this in gratitude for his mentorship, and in appreciation of his group’s continuing work.

For more details read the full paper:

Coinage metal complexes supported by a “PN3P” scaffold
Gyandshwar Kumar Rao, Serge I. Gorelsky, Ilia Korobkov and Darrin Richeson
Dalton Trans., 2015,44, 19153-19162
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03515E


Ian Mallov Ian Mallov is currently a Ph.D. student in Professor Doug Stephan’s group at the University of Toronto. His research is focused on synthesizing new Lewis-acidic compounds active in Frustrated Lewis Pair chemistry. He grew up in Truro, Nova Scotia and graduated from Dalhousie University and the University of Ottawa, and worked in chemical analysis in industry for three years before returning to grad school.
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John Arnold announced as Dalton Transactions new Editorial Board Chair

Dalton Transactions is delighted to announce that Professor John Arnold (University of Berkeley, California) will become Chairman of the Editorial Board from 1st January 2016.

John’s research focusses on the study of new and unusual molecular inorganic and organometallic compounds of the d-, p- and f-block elements, which is at the core of the journal’s scope. He also looks into the novel reactivity and/or catalytic behaviour of small molecules using a variety of characterisation

He has been an Associate Editor for Dalton Transactions since 2002. In that time he has actively promoted the journal worldwide and contributed to the strategy of the journal, during a period in which the size of the journal has changed significantly.

“I am happy and honoured to be appointed as the new Chair of the Editorial Board of Dalton Transactions. I look forward to working alongside Andrew Shore and the entire RSC editorial team, the Editorial Board and the Advisory Board, to bolster Dalton Transactions’ current standing. Together, we will continue to build the journal’s reputation for high quality papers, fair, strong, and timely refereeing, and rapid publication times.”

Professor Philip Mountford (University of Oxford), current Chairman of the Editorial Board will finish at the end of December this year.

“I am delighted that John Arnold will be taking over as Chair of the Editorial Board. I know that under his leadership the board and editors will take the journal on from strength to strength. I have been very privileged to work with an outstanding group of professionals in the Dalton Transactions Editorial team and an equally talented and dedicated board.”

As the Chair of the Editorial Board, John will lead an international team of researchers from all areas of inorganic chemistry. Associate Editors Christine Thomas (Brandeis University) and Warren Piers (University of Calgary) handle manuscripts on organometallics, main group chemistry and homogenous catalysis; Pingyun Feng (University of California, Riverside) and Russell Morris (University of St Andrews), handle papers on solid state and inorganic materials chemistry; Guo-Xin Jin (Fudan University) handles manuscripts on supramolecular and coordination chemistry and Masahiro Yamashita (Tohoku University) continues to serve the field of magnetism. Submissions received in bioinorganic chemistry are handled Nils Metzler-Nolte (Ruhr-Universität Bochum). In addition to our Associate Editors, Polly Arnold (The University of Edinburgh) and Lars Kloo (Royal Institute of Technology) sit on the Dalton Transactions Editorial Board as Members.

John invites members of the community who have a question about Dalton Transactions – whether it be submissions, refereeing, service to the journal, or editorial concerns – to contact him directly. Alternatively please contact the Editorial Office at dalton-rsc@rsc.org and we will be happy to help.

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Report from the Northern Postdoctoral Researchers Meeting

The Northern Postdoctoral researchers meeting took place on May 28th at the School of Chemistry and Zochonis Building, The University of Manchester. This was the fourth of a series of events organised by the Chemistry Postdoctoral Society for the academic year 2014/15, included in the proposal funded by the Dalton Division Committee through the Small Grants for Scientific Activities scheme.

The purpose of the meeting was to gather young scientists from the Northern and North-West region, giving the chance to showcase their research and offering also a great networking opportunity. The event was free to attend and saw the participation of around 70 attendants between Postdocs and PhDs coming from the University of Manchester, University of Liverpool, University of Huddersfield, University of Sheffield, University of Hull, University of York, and University of Leeds.

Postdoctoral researchers selected from Northern institutions (Manchester, Huddersfield, Hull, Leeds and Liverpool) offered research talks which spread across a wide range of topics in chemistry. The quality of the talks and of the research presented was outstanding, leading also to a great interaction between the audience and the speakers.

After the coffee break, the meeting was moved to the foyer of the School of Chemistry were the poster session took place, featuring over 30 contribution from Postdocs and PhD from various Northern institutions. At the end of the poster session, two prizes were awarded, sponsored by Dalton Transactions. The winner of the prize for the best postgraduate poster went to Luke Wilkinson (University of Sheffield), whilst the prize for the best poster from a postdoctoral researcher was awarded to Kevin Vincent (University of Huddersfield).

Dr Fabrizio Ortu (right) with poster prize winners Kevin Vincent (University of Huddersfield) and Luke Wilkinson (University of Sheffield)

In general, we received very enthusiastic feedback about the meeting. In particular, visiting postdoctoral researchers had high praises for the work of the Postdoctoral Society and offered to organise another event analogous to this in one year’s time.

The meeting was kindly supported by the RSC Dalton Division and the School of Chemistry (UoM). Furthermore the Postdoctoral Society obtained additional support from Fluorochem, Sigma-Aldrich and TCI. Dalton Transactions was acknowledged during the opening and closing remarks of the conference; additionally the Dalton Transactions logo was included in the conference material.

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Professor Kenneth Wade, F.R.S. 13th October 1932–16th March 2014

This themed collection of articles in Dalton Transactions is dedicated to Ken Wade, who very unexpectedly passed away on 16th March 2014.  While this sad loss is the reason for this commemoration, it is an honour for me to write this preface.

I had the pleasure and privilege of getting to know Ken personally during my student days at Durham, a relationship that continued when, much more recently, I became a colleague in the same Department.

I first met Ken when, as a second year undergraduate, he introduced us to aspects of structure and bonding.  Only after looking up the subject in the textbooks, did I realise that the relationships he was describing were in fact ‘Wade’s rules’.

It is a vivid reflection of Ken’s humble and self-effacing character that he himself only ever referred to these rules as polyhedral skeletal electron pair theory (PSEPT) or even occasionally during his lectures or in discussions as “Blogg’s Rules”!

Ken’s pioneering work exploring and explaining the structures of deceivingly unrelated clusters and ring systems, which developed primarily as a result of his insightfulness, logical thinking and intuition, now means that his name is familiar to every inorganic chemist, from undergraduate student to senior research professor.

This work lead to the formalised relationship between structure and electron counting in polyhedral cluster systems: relationships that are known universally as Wade’s Rules (J. Chem. Soc. D, 1971, 792).

This set of deceptively simple rules has been developed and expanded into what are known today as the Wade-Mingos Rules, which continue to be taught to chemistry students worldwide as a fundamental tool of Inorganic Chemistry.

Ken’s research career started in 1954 when he began his Ph.D. at the University of Nottingham with Norman Greenwood, probing the addition compounds of gallium and boron trichlorides.  This was followed by two postdoctoral positions: first at Cambridge with Harry Emeléus, working on “assorted reactions of diborane”, and second, at Cornell University with Albert Laubengayer, where he investigated various aspects of organonitrogen-aluminium chemistry.

In 1960, Ken returned to the UK to take up his first independent academic position as a lecturer at Derby College of Technology, before moving north to take up a lectureship at the University of Durham a year later, where his interests in synthetic main group chemistry continued to expand.

Although universally known for his electron counting rules, Ken’s innovative and creative character also led him to be major contributor to the areas of azomethine, lithium amide, organophosphorus, transition metal and organolithium chemistry, to name but a few.  Ken officially retired in 1997 and, for the sixteen years leading up to his untimely passing, he remained in the Department holding an Emeritus chair of Inorganic Chemistry.

Throughout his sixty-year research career Ken maintained a tireless enthusiasm and curiosity for chemistry, teaching, writing books and original papers, reviewing articles, attending chemistry meetings, and giving invited lectures around the world.  Ken’s numerous contributions to the broad field of chemistry were recognised by his election to Fellow of the Royal Society in 1989, and by his election to President of the Dalton Division of The Royal Society of Chemistry in 1996.

On top of all these achievements, Ken’s enormous abilities as a teacher and leader must not be forgotten.  His lectures were always inspiring, and were characterised by being both simple and clear, while delivering a broad spectrum of inorganic chemistry topics.

Every lecture was punctuated by anecdotes and amusing stories – who can forget the colour-blind English spy in Russia – and always demonstrated Ken’s ability for clear, logical thinking, something he continually encouraged and inspired in others, be it through undergraduate tutorials, questions after seminars, or chats in the corridor or around the whiteboard.

This themed collection of papers of 60 papers in Dalton Transactions covers a wide and diverse spectrum of topics spanning inorganic chemistry, something that very clearly demonstrates Ken’s significant and wide-ranging contributions to inorganic chemistry in its broadest context.

The rapidity with which all of the invited authors agreed to contribute their work to this special collection of articles unmistakeably reflects the great esteem and friendship with which Ken was held, and provides a fitting tribute to the man himself, his huge role as a teacher and mentor, and his important and extensive contributions to chemistry…  Without a doubt, Ken is very sorely missed.

Philip W. Dyer
Department of Chemistry
Durham University, UK

(Left – cover art for the themed collection kindly provided by Professor Jeremy Rawson, University of Windsor. It features the an image of seminal ChemComm paper from 1971 – click to zoom)

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Lectureship awards & Poster prizes at the 5th Asian Conference on Coordination Chemistry

Poster prize winners with Dalton Transactions Editor, Andrew Shore

Many congratulations to the Dalton Transactions Lectureship and Poster prize winners who were awarded at the 5th Asian Conference on Coordination Chemistry (ACCC5) which took from the 12th - 16th July 2015 in Hong Kong.

Recipients of the Lectureship were: John Nitzchke, David Parker and Philip Mountford who is currently the Editorial Board Chair for Dalton Transactions.

The conference is one of the largest regional conferences in Asia; focussing on the area of coordination chemistry and providing a forum for inorganic and coordination chemists to meet and discuss ideas on the most frontier research topics as well as an opportunity to present their most recent research findings.

Further information regarding the conference can be found here.

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October’s HOT articles

HOT articles for October are below and free to acess for 4 weeks. These have also been compiled into a collection on our website.

Phosphole formation by 1,1-carboboration – reactions of bis-alkynyl phosphanes with a frustrated P/B Lewis pair
Annika Klose, Gerald Kehr, Constantin G. Daniliuc and Gerhard Erker
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03055B

graphical abstract

Free to access until 5th November 2015


The carboboration of Me3Si-substituted alkynes and allenes with boranes and borocations
James R. Lawson, Valerio Fasano, Jessica Cid, Inigo Vitorica-Yrezabal and Michael J. Ingleson
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03003J

graphical abstract

Free to access until 5th November 2015

 


Transition metal-mediated donor–acceptor coordination of low-oxidation state Group 14 element halides
Anindya K. Swarnakar, Michael J. Ferguson, Robert McDonald and Eric Rivard
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03018H

graphical abstract

Free to access until 5th November 2015

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September’s HOT articles

September’s selection of HOT articles are below. These are free to acess for 4 weeks and available for viewing in a collection on our website.

Coordination polymers from a highly flexible alkyldiamine-derived ligand: structure, magnetism and gas adsorption studies
Chris S. Hawes, Nicholas F. Chilton, Boujemaa Moubaraki, Gregory P. Knowles, Alan L. Chaffee, Keith S. Murray, Stuart R. Batten and David R. Turner
Dalton Trans., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02323H

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 16th October 2015


Dinuclear iridium and rhodium complexes with bridging arylimidazolide-N3,C2 ligands: synthetic, structural, reactivity, electrochemical and spectroscopic studies
Fan He, Laurent Ruhlmann, Jean-Paul Gisselbrecht, Sylvie Choua, Maylis Orio, Marcel Wesolek, Andreas A. Danopoulos and Pierre Braunstein
Dalton Trans., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02403J

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 16th October 2015


Elucidating the mechanism responsible for anomalous thermal expansion in a metal–organic framework
Dewald P. van Heerden, Catharine Esterhuysen and Leonard J. Barbour
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT01927C

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 16th October 2015


Polyfluorinated carba-closo-dodecaboranes with amino and ammonio substituents bonded to boron
Szymon Z. Konieczka, Michael Drisch, Katharina Edkins, Michael Hailmann and Maik Finze
Dalton Trans., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02055G

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 16th October 2015


Albumin binding and ligand-exchange processes of the Ru(III) anticancer agent NAMI-A and its bis-DMSO analogue determined by ENDOR spectroscopy
Michael I. Webb and Charles J. Walsby
Dalton Trans., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02021B

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 16th October 2015


Synthetic strategies to bicyclic tetraphosphanes using P1, P2 and P4 building blocks
Jonas Bresien, Kirill Faust, Christian Hering-Junghans, Julia Rothe, Axel Schulz and Alexander Villinger
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT02757H

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 16th October 2015

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July’s HOT articles

Take a look at our HOT articles for July. These are only free to acess for 4 weeks only and are available for viewing in a collection on our website.

A mononuclear Ni(II) complex: a field induced single-molecule magnet showing two slow relaxation processes
Jozef Miklovič, Dušan Valigura, Roman Boča and Ján Titiš
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 12484-12487
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT01213A

Graphical Abstract

  

Free to access until 6th August 2015 

 


 ZnII and HgII binding to a designed peptide that accommodates different coordination geometries
Dániel Szunyogh, Béla Gyurcsik, Flemming H. Larsen, Monika Stachura, Peter W. Thulstrup, Lars Hemmingsen and Attila Jancsó
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 12576-12588
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT00945F 

Graphical Abstract 

Free to access until 6th August 2015  


 

Photophysical tuning of the aggregation-induced emission of a series of para-substituted aryl bis(imino)acenaphthene zinc complexes
Daniel A. Evans, Lucia Myongwon Lee, Ignacio Vargas-Baca and Alan H. Cowley
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 11984-11996
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT01529D 

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 6th August 2015


An investigation into the photochemistry of, and the electrochemically induced CO-loss from, [(CO)5MC(OMe)Me](M = Cr or W) using low-temperature matrix isolation, picosecond infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and time-dependent density functional theory
Suzanne McMahon, Saeed Amirjalayer, Wybren J. Buma, Yvonne Halpin, Conor Long, A. Denise Rooney, Sander Woutersen and Mary T. Pryce
Dalton Trans., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT01568E

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 6th August 2015


Aza-macrocyclic complexes of the Group 1 cations – synthesis, structures and density functional theory study
John Dyke, William Levason, Mark E. Light, David Pugh, Gillian Reid, Hanusha Bhakhoa, Ponnadurai Ramasami and Lydia Rhyman 
Dalton Trans., 2015, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT01865J  

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 6th August 2015


As-stereogenic C2-symmetric organoarsines: synthesis and enantioselective self-assembly into a dinuclear triple-stranded helicate with copper iodide
Hiroki Adachi, Hiroaki Imoto, Seiji Watase, Kimihiro Matsukawa and Kensuke Naka
Dalton Trans., 2015, Advance Article 
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT01490E  

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 6th August 2015

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The Crystal Field Theory They Didn’t Teach You in Undergrad

To me the most interesting observation in the recent Dalton Transactions paper from the group of Professor Phil Power was their suggestion that secondary interactions between dicoordinate Fe(II) atoms and carbon atoms on their ligands probably have a significant effect on the magnetic moment of the complexes.

Specifically, they postulate that these interactions help to quench the orbital contribution to the magnetic moment, which is significant for other dicoordinate Fe(II) complexes studied.

But let’s take a step back.  Dicoordinate Iron(II) complexes were unknown until the 1980’s, thought to be too unstable to isolate and structurally characterize.  As the authors detail, examples were discovered gradually. All featuring large coordinating ligands bound through anionic C, N, or O donors.  Power reports a total of thirty currently known.

No one, it appears, has previously undertaken thorough magnetic studies.  Indeed, do you remember studying how crystal field theory applies to dicoordinate metal species in your introductory inorganic class?  I don’t.

The authors focus their attention on four species. Two of these feature large silylamido ligands and have solid-state N-Fe-N angles of 169o and 172o, the other have two large aryl ligands and exhibit slightly more bent geometries.  The authors support the evidence that a significant part of the measured temperature-dependent magnetic moment of these molecules arises from the orbital contribution – that is, from the motion of electrons around the iron nucleus, rather than arising only from the spin contribution, the electrons spinning about their own axes.

However, the less linear aryl iron(ll) complexes show the greater orbital contribution to the magnetic moment, which brings me back to the beginning.  This is a thorough paper; the authors also construct a spectrochemical series for the dicoordinate Fe(II) complexes and exactingly compare computed and experimental magnetic data.  But the original small structure-function observation fascinated me on my first reading.

Read the full article now:

Ligand field influence on the electronic and magnetic properties of quasi-linear two-coordinate iron(II) complexes
Nicholas F. Chilton, Hao Lei, Aimee M. Bryan, Fernande Grandjean, Gary J. Long and Philip P. Power
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 11202-11211
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT01589H


Ian Mallov Ian Mallov is currently a Ph.D. student in Professor Doug Stephan’s group at the University of Toronto. His research is focused on synthesizing new Lewis-acidic compounds active in Frustrated Lewis Pair chemistry. He grew up in Truro, Nova Scotia and graduated from Dalhousie University and the University of Ottawa, and worked in chemical analysis in industry for three years before returning to grad school.
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