Author Archive

RSC Solid State Group Christmas Meeting 2011

The RSC Solid State Group will be hosting its 31st Christmas meeting  on 19th – 20th December 2011 at the University of Liverpool.

For more information about the groups activities visit their webpage or find them on MyRSC.

Invited talks will be given by Prof. Paul Attfield (University of Edinburgh), Prof. Martin Dove (Queen Mary, University of London), Dr Andrew Goodwin (University of Oxford) and Dalton Transactions Associate Editor, Prof. Russell Morris (University of St. Andrews).

Abstracts are invited for both oral and poster presentations and the deadline for abstract submission is 11th November.  Further information can be found here:

http://www.liv.ac.uk/chemistry/conferences/ssg/index.html

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RSC Inorganic Chemistry Awards: Nominations now open

Do you know someone who has advanced research in inorganic chemistry by developing new organometallic compounds or by providing vital insight into catalytic processes?

The RSC has a wide range of Prizes and Awards to acknowledge those undertaking excellent work from across the field of inorganic chemistry. Nominations are now open, so get your suggests in now. The closing date for nominations is 15th January 2012.

To find out more visit the RSC Inorganic Chemistry Awards website. The ones that are open for nominations say (Open 2012) in brackets at the end.

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Are you in interested in science writing? We’re looking for a web writer for Dalton Transactions

We are looking for someone who is interested in science writing to act as a web writer for the Dalton Transactions blog (http://blogs.rsc.org/dt/). We’d be asking for someone to write about once a week highlighting an interesting paper, topic, conference or story in inorganic chemistry.

If you are interested in this great opportunity to practise your science communication skills please contact us at the Dalton Trans. Editorial Office.

Don’t forget to keep up to date with the latest news and research in inorganic chemistry by signing up to the Dalton Transactions e-alert, and following us on Twitter.

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Third Dalton Transactions International Symposium: Bioinorganic Chemistry

The Third Dalton Transactions International Symposium on Bioinorganic Chemistry will be held in Japan in November.

This free symposium will be held in two venues, at Osaka University (Monday 14th November), and at Kyushu University (Wednesday 16th November) and will feature a selection of lectures reflecting the academic and industrial breadth of the field of bioinorganic chemistry.

There is no need to register, you can just turn up, and if you’d like more information visit the Dalton Transactions symposium webpage. We hope to see you in Japan next month!

Interested in bioinorganic chemistry? Read our themed issue on ‘Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging and therapy’, guest edited by Stephen Faulkner (University of Oxford) and Nicholas Long (Imperial College London).

Keep up to date with the latest news and research in inorganic chemistry: sign up to the Dalton Transactions e-alert, check out our blog, and follow us on Twitter.

The symposium will be held in two venues, at Osaka University (Monday 14th November), and at Kyushu University (Wednesday 16th November)
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Hot Article: Using DFT to understand the heme active site of P450

Frank Neese (Max Planck) and Serena DeBeer (Cornell University), predict iron K-edge XAS pre-edge features for iron complexes using time-dependent density functional theory in this Dalton Transactions Hot article.

This work is building on the teams earlier investigations into ferrous and ferric complexes. The group will use their improved understanding of high valent iron intermediates to explain more about the behaviour of metalloproteins, and in this case they look at the heme active site of P450.

This paper is part of a themed issue guest edited by Stuart MacGregor (Heriot-Watt) on Computational Chemistry of Molecular Inorganic Systems that will be published online in the next few weeks. Make sure you hear about it by signing up to the Dalton Transactions table of contents e-alerts.

Read the full article for FREE  until 8th November to find out more about the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to understand metalloproteins…

Prediction of high-valent iron K-edge absorption spectra by time-dependent Density Functional Theory
P. Chandrasekaran, S. Chantal E. Stieber, Terrence J. Collins, Lawrence Que, Jr., Frank Neese and Serena DeBeer
Dalton Trans., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1DT11331C

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Hot Article: Organoruthenium anti-cancer complexes

Peter Sadler from Warwick University, and collaborators at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a ruthenium arene anticancer complex that inhibits the action of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which regulates insulin levels.

In this Dalton Transactions Hot article the team investigate how the complex interacts with the active site of PTP1B by using a similiar shaped molecule as a model. Their compound was found to have an IC50 of 19 μM.

Read the full article for FREE until 2nd November to find out more about how this anticancer compound works…

Reactions of an organoruthenium anticancer complex with 2-mercaptobenzanilide—a model for the active-site cysteine of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B
Yumiao Han, Qun Luo, Xiang Hao, Xianchan Li, Fuyi Wang, Wenbing Hu, Kui Wu, Shuang Lü and Peter J. Sadler
Dalton Trans., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1DT11189B

Keep up to date with the latest news and research in inorganic chemistry: sign up to the Dalton Transactions e-alert, check out our blog, and follow us on Twitter.

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Perspective: Suning Wang on triarylboron compounds for optoelectronics

Suning Wang from Queen’s University, Canada, looks at how electron accepting triarylboranes can be used in optoelectronic applications in this Dalton Transactions Perspective article.

Wang and her PhD student, Zachary Hudson, discuss the role of boron, and the photophysical properties of metal-containing triarylboranes. They go on to review the recent research, looking at triarylboron-containing complexes in OLEDs and as anion sensors, as well their use in MOFs, zinc sensors and as vapochromic materials to detect VOCs.

Read the full article to find out more…

Metal-containing triarylboron compounds for optoelectronic applications
Zachary M. Hudson and Suning Wang
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 7805-7816
DOI: 10.1039/C1DT10292C

Professor Wang is an Associate Editor for our new journal, RSC Advances, read more about her research.

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Inorganic Conference of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute and the New Zealand Institute of Chemistry

Dalton Transactions is delighted to be sponsoring the 2011 Inorganic Conference of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute and the New Zealand Institute of Chemistry in Perth in December.

The meeting promises to be a great event, with plenary speakers such as Neil Champness, Munetaka Akita and Luisa De Cola. Find out more about who else is speaking: http://www.ic11.org.au/node/13

Early bird registration has been extended to 1st October 2011, so there is still time to sign up!

http://www.ic11.org.au/

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Hot Article: Understanding [4C+3C] cycloaddition

A group of Spanish scientists have investigated the intramolecular [4C+3C] cycloaddition reaction of allenedienes in this Dalton Transactions Hot article.

The researchers from Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and CSIC used density functional theory to look at the mechanism of the reaction when catalysed by PtCl2 and Au(I). They had a range of questions they wanted to answer, including ‘do the allene substituents affect the reaction mechanism? Are the PtCl2 and Au(I)-catalyzed processes exhibiting a similar profile? Why do some substrate/catalyst combinations give rise to [4 + 2] instead of [4 + 3] cycloadducts?’

Read the full article for FREE to find out what they discovered…

Theoretical study on intramolecular allene-diene cycloadditions catalyzed by PtCl2 and Au(I) complexes
Sergi Montserrat, Isaac Alonso, Fernando López, José L. Mascareñas, Agustí Lledós and Gregori Ujaque
Dalton Trans., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1DT11061F

Keep up to date with the latest news and research in inorganic chemistry: sign up to the Dalton Transactions e-alert, follow us on Twitter, and get the RSS feed.

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Hot Article: Nickel(II) carboxylate chemistry

Researchers from the University of Barcelona make discrete polynuclear metal complexes containing nickel in this Dalton Transactions Hot article.

Albert Escuer and colleagues are working on improving the understanding of nickel/pyridyloximato chemistry, as they are interested in the paramagnetic properties of these compounds, which may make them useful in molecular spintronics and quantum computers.

Read the full article for FREE to find out more…

Use of 6-methylpyridine-2-carbaldehydeoxime in nickel(II) carboxylate chemistry: synthetic, structural and magnetic properties of penta and hexanuclear complexes
Albert Escuer, Gina Vlahopoulou and Franz A. Mautner
Dalton Trans., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1DT10657K

Find out more about the research in Albert Escuer’s group by visiting his website.

Keep up to date with the latest news and research in inorganic chemistry: sign up to the Dalton Transactions e-alert, follow us on Twitter, and get the RSS feed.

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