Author Archive

Congratulations to Journées de Chimie de Coordination 2019 Prize Winners!

The 2019 Journées de Chimie de Coordination meeting was held 31st January – 1st February in Montpellier, France. These two days were organised by chemists from the four major chemistry institutes of Montpellier (ICGM, IBMM, IEM and ICSM) in order to bring together the French Coordination Chemistry community around a scientific program comprising of six plenary conferences and Oral Communication and Poster prizes.

There were talks from over 20 speakers including, Jean-François Nierengarten (University of Strasbourg), Eduardo Peris (Universitat Jaume I), Clotilde Policar (Sorbonne University), Corine Mathonière (Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux), Myrtil Kahn (CNRS) and Abderrahmane Amgoune (Institut de Chimie et Biochimie Moléculaires et Supramoléculaires).

 

Dalton Transactions and New Journal of Chemistry sponsored a poster prize and an oral prize each.

 

The two poster prize winners were:

Ghada Manai, Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets (Dalton Transactions) for their poster entitled:

Matériaux hybrides nanostructures à base de nanoparticules de platine et de plymères peptidiques

Ekaterina Mamontova, Université de Montpellier (NJC) for their poster entitled:

Making Prussian blue analogues nanoparticles luminescent: effect of the confinement over the properties

Ekaterina Mamontova, Université de Montpellier, Journées de Chimie de Coordination 2019 Ding Wang, École Polytechnique, Journées de Chimie de Coordination

(left to right) NJC Poster Prize winner, Ekaterina Mamontova and Dalton Transactions Oral prize winner, Ding Wang

 

The two oral prizes winners were:

Ding Wang, École Polytechnique (Dalton Transactions)

Synthesis and Characterizations of an Original Heterobimetallic Nickel Complex with Divalent Organolanthanides

Maya Guillaumont, Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique (NJC)

Theoretical study of Reduction Routes of MX(PPh3)3 in complex environment toward synthesis of Cobalt and Nickel Nanocrystals

 

The winners received a journal certificate and a book voucher. Dalton Transactions and New Journal of Chemistry sends hearty congratulations to the winners!

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Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2018

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2018, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Catherine Constable-Housecroft, University of Basel ORCiD: 0000-0002-8074-0089

Professor Marilena Ferbinteanu, University of Bucharest ORCiD: 0000-0002-7019-4635

Dr Diana Iovan, UC Berkeley ORCiD: 0000-0001-9889-7183

Professor Yahong Li, Soochow University ORCiD: 0000-0002-6467-0607

Dr Wei Li, West Virginia University ORCiD: 0000-0003-2802-7443

Dr Shaikh Mobin, Indian Institute of Technology, Indore ORCiD: 0000-0003-1940-3822 

Professor Keith Murray, Monash University ORCiD: 0000-0003-4098-9389

Dr Takuya Shiga, University of Tsukuba ORCiD: 0000-0002-6834-6011

Professor Mike Ward, University of Warwick ORCiD: 0000-0001-8175-8822

Professor Zhiguo Xia, University of Science and Technology, Beijing ORCiD: 0000-0002-9670-3223

We would also like to thank the Dalton Transactions board and the inorganic chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Brandi M. Cossairt – 2018 Dalton Transactions UC Berkeley Lecture

Brandi Cossairt

 

The 2018 Dalton Transactions University of California, Berkeley Lecture is Professor Brandi Cossairt, at the University of Washington. The Lecture recognizes independent early career researchers who have made a significant contribution to the field of inorganic chemistry.

 

The academic selected to give the lecture receives the opportunity to present at UC Berkeley, a plaque, a $500 honorarium, a dinner and an invitation to publish in Dalton Transactions.

Brandi Cossairt and John Arnold Dalton Transactions

Brandi Cossairt (right) receiving her award plaque from Dalton Transactions Editorial Board Chair John Arnold (left)

Professor Cossairt’s lecture was entitled The Chemistry of Nanoscale Phosphides: Building Complex Inorganic “Molecules” with Atom-Level Precision:

 

Abstract: Research in the Cossairt lab is focused on the solution-phase synthesis of chemical systems capable of sunlight absorption, color-pure emission, charge transfer, and fuels generation. Towards this end we seek to address fundamental challenges in the field of inorganic chemistry, specifically controlling the composition, structure and function of nanoscale light absorbers and catalysts, and controlling the interactions between them. This talk will focus primarily on our efforts to understand the precursor conversion reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms, and approaches to the post-synthetic transformation of indium phosphide quantum dots for use in solid-state lighting and displays. This research has catalyzed a number of other areas of investigation including the synthesis of other pnictide-based nanomaterials for use in light harvesting and catalysis that will also be discussed.

 

Brandi Cossairt was born and raised in Miami, Florida. She is a first-generation college graduate, having obtained her B. S. in Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 2006. Brandi went on to pursue graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the guidance of Professor Christopher C. Cummins and was awarded her Ph.D. in 2010. She then continued her academic career as an NIH NRSA Postdoctoral Fellow at Columbia University between 2010 and 2012 working with Professor Jonathan Owen. Brandi joined the Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington as an Assistant Professor in 2012 and was promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure in 2018. She has received a number of awards for her research including a Sloan Research Fellowship, a Packard Fellowship, an NSF CAREER Award, a Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, and the National Fresenius Award from the American Chemical Society. Outside of the lab Brandi is an Associate Editor at the ACS journal Inorganic Chemistry and is the co-founder of the Chemistry Women Mentorship Network (ChemWMN).

 

We spoke to Professor Cossairt about what attracted her to a career in research and what excites her the most about her own research areas:

 

Insatiable curiosity and a love of mentorship. I never tire of asking new questions and trying to develop strategies to answer them. Getting to share the beauty and excitement of science with the next generation is also extremely fulfilling.

It seems that every year we (the collective we) are able to make new strides in understanding phenomena that were complete black boxes. The level of mechanistic and structural understanding that is emerging in the field of colloidal inorganic nanoscience continues to boggle my mind. I am delighted to be a part of the cohort of scientists that are leading the way in developing predictive design principles for the synthesis of complex inorganic nanostructures.”

 

And when asked what advice she would pass on, she had this advice:

 

“Pursue the science you love. Your excitement will be contagious and will bring others on board.”

 

Previous recipients include Jillian Dempsey, Kit Cummins, John Hartwig, Geoff Coates, Paul Chirik, Dan Mindiola, Teri Odom, Daniel Gamelin, Trevor Hayton, Christine Thomas, Mircea Dinca, and Alison Fout.

An online collection of recent Dalton Transactions papers by recipients of the lecture can be found here.

A doubly deprotonated diimine dioximate metalloligand as a synthon for multimetallic complex assembly

Graphical abstract of Brandi Cossairt’s recent publication in Dalton Transactions.
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03650J

 

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