Author Archive

A golden future for hydrogen bonding

Two-dimensional contour plot of [Me2Au]− adduct with HCN.

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry Two-dimensional contour plot of [Me2Au]− adduct with HCN. Red areas identify the stabilising interactions and blue destabilising interactions

Gold has surprised chemists by showing that a formally positively charged Au(I) ion can be a hydrogen bond acceptor.1 This discovery challenges the traditional view that hydrogen bond acceptors are negatively charged.

Catharine Esterhuysen and her colleagues at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, used theoretical calculations to study how dimethylaurate interacted with six hydrogen bond donors including HF, HCN and NH3.This study expands their previous work showing that Au(I) can be a hydrogen bond acceptor for water.2 Strong or moderate hydrogen bonds were found for five of the pairs. As expected, the Au(I)···H–X bonds were weaker than those formed with the negative auride ion, but surprisingly the bonds with HF and HCN were more stabilising than their analogues with [(CO)4Co], which contains a negatively charged Co centre.

Interested? The full article can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is free to access until 27th April 2017.

Gold setting the “gold standard” among transition metals as a hydrogen bond acceptor – a theoretical investigation
Ferdinand Groenewald, Helgard G. Raubenheimer, Jan Dillen and Catharine Esterhuysen*
Dalton Trans., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7DT00329C

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Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Marius Andruh, University of Bucharest
Peter Budzelaar, University of Manitoba
Malcolm Halcrow, University of Leeds
Atsushi Kobayashi, Hokkaido University
George Kostakis, University of Sussex
Dong-Sheng Li, China Three Gorges University
Chengyu Mao, University of California at Riverside
Dawid Pinkowicz, Jagiellonian University
Di Sun, Shandong University

We would also like to thank the Dalton Transactions board and the Inorganic community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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First uranium–rhodium bond shows that shorter is not stronger

Researchers in the UK have made the first two uranium–rhodium complexes and found their uranium–rhodium bonds to be among the shortest heterometallic uranium bonds ever reported.1

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry The uranium–rhodium distances in these two complexes are among the shortest between f-elements and transition metals reported to date

Building on their recent success forming uranium complexes with nickel, palladium and platinum,2 Polly Arnold’s group at the University of Edinburgh used a carefully designed bidentate phosphinoaryloxide ligand (ArPO) to create two distinct uranium–rhodium complexes: a tetrametallic dimer, [I2U(OArP)2RhI]2, and a monomeric complex with three phosphinoaryloxide ligands and a bridging iodide. Although the two uranium–rhodium bonds are of similar length (2.760Å in the dimeric complex and 2.763Å in the monomeric one), electrochemical studies show that the bond stabilities are very different.

Interested? The full story can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is free to access until 30th March 2017:

Uranium rhodium bonding in heterometallic complexes
J. A. Hlina, J. A. L. Wells, J. R. Pankhurst, Jason B. Love and P. L. Arnold
Dalton Trans., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6DT04570G

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Welcoming our newest Editorial Board member: Marinella Mazzanti

Welcome to Professor Marinella Mazzanti who joins us as Editorial Board member for Dalton Transactions. Professor Mazzanti is currently the Head and founder of the Group of Coordination Chemistry at EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) in Switzerland.

Her research interests include: Lanthanides and Actinides Coordination Chemistry; Lanthanides and Actinides Supramolecular Chemistry; Redox Reactivity of Low Valent f Elements; Gadolinium Based MRI Contrast Agents; Lanthanide Based Luminescent Architectures; Single Molecule Magnets; Small Molecule Activation.

Professor Mazzanti has also participated in more than 30 invited seminars at International conferences and Universities in Europe and the USA.

Below is a selection of articles Professor Mazzanti has published with us:

CS2 activation at uranium(III) siloxide ate complexes: the effect of a Lewis acidic site
Clément Camp, Oliver Cooper, Julie Andrez, Jacques Pécaut and Marinella Mazzanti
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 2650-2656
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT02585G, Paper
From themed collection Dalton Discussion 14: Advancing the chemistry of the f-elements

Crystal structure diversity in the bis[hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate]iodouranium(III) complex: from neutral to cationic forms
Maria Augusta Antunes, Isabel C. Santos, Hélène Bolvin, Laura C. J. Pereira, Marinella Mazzanti, Joaquim Marçalo and Manuel Almeida
Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 8861-8867
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT50753J, Paper

Optimizing the relaxivity of Gd(III) complexes appended to InP/ZnS quantum dots by linker tuning
Graeme J. Stasiuk, Sudarsan Tamang, Daniel Imbert, Christelle Gateau, Peter Reiss, Pascal Fries and Marinella Mazzanti
Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 8197-8200
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT50774B, Communication

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Welcoming our new Associate Editor: Wolfgang Tremel

Dalton Transactions would like to welcome Professor Wolfgang Tremel who joins us as our newest Associate Editor. Wolfgang is currently a full Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Germany. His research interests include: Inorganic materials chemistry, Surface and interface chemistry, Biomineralization, Nanoparticles for applications in drug delivery, in vivo sensing and catalysis, Energy processes (thermoelectric, photonics, phononics, light harvesting).

Professor Tremel is ‘looking forward to collaborating and contributing to a further success of the journal’.

A small selection of articles published by Professor Tremel are below:

Biogenic synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using Pulicaria glutinosa extract and their catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction
Mujeeb Khan, Merajuddin Khan, Mufsir Kuniyil, Syed Farooq Adil, Abdulrahman Al-Warthan, Hamad Z. Alkhathlan, Wolfgang Tremel, Muhammad Nawaz Tahir and Mohammed Rafiq H. Siddiqui
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 9026-9031
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53554A, Paper

Hybrid chalcogenide nanoparticles: 2D-WS2 nanocrystals inside nested WS2 fullerenes
Faegheh Hoshyargar, Tomas P. Corrales, Robert Branscheid, Ute Kolb, Michael Kappl, Martin Panthöfer and Wolfgang Tremel
Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 14568-14575
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51537K, Paper

Thermoelectric properties of spark-plasma sintered nanoparticular FeSb2 prepared via a solution chemistry approach
Gregor Kieslich, Christina S. Birkel, Igor Veremchuk, Yuri Grin and Wolfgang Tremel
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 558-562
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT51535D, Paper

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Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be read here.

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Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson Dalton Poster Symposium 2017

The RSC Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson Dalton Poster Symposium provides an opportunity for talented young inorganic chemists (PhDs and postdocs) to present their work to their peers and senior representatives from industry and academia. The symposium, funded by the Geoffrey Wilkinson Foundation, is free to attend for successful applicants and we will cover up to £150 travel expenses. On the day there will be talks from Royal Society of Chemistry prize/award winners and there is also the opportunity to win significant prizes including bursaries to attend an international conference.

The event will take place in Burlington House, London on the 27th March 2017.

The deadline for poster abstracts is the 13th January 2017.

Further information about the symposium and how to submit an abstract can be found here.

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Inorganic Chemistry Symposium

24th October: Inorganic Chenmistry Symposium at Kyushu University hosted by Professor Yoshio Hisaeda

Our flagship inorganic chemistry journal Dalton Transactions was proud to co-present the Inorganic Chemistry Symposium which took place on the 24th October in Fukuoka, Japan. The symposium was co-presented with Kyushu University, Osaka University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology. It was also supported by Chemical Science, ChemComm, Chemical Society Reviews, and Inorganic Chemistry Frontiers.

Amongst those speaking at the symposium were Dalton Transactions Executive editor, Dr Andrew Shore (Royal Society of Chemistry, UK) who gave a talk on: ​Publishing your research in high impact journals and Dalton Editorial board member: Professor Polly Arnold (University of Edinburgh, UK) whose talk was on: Architectural control of f-block organometallics for small molecule activation. The full list of speakers can be found here.

26th October: Osaka University, symposium hosted by Professor Shinobu Itoh (Front row, far right: Dalton Transactions Executive Editor, Andrew Shore. Second row, second left: RSC Japan representative Hiromitsu Urakami)

26th October: Osaka University, symposium hosted by Professor Shinobu Itoh (Front row, far right: Dalton Transactions Executive Editor, Andrew Shore. Second row, second left: RSC Japan representative Hiromitsu Urakami)

The symposium brought together leading international scientists, delivering lectures which covered the broad scope of Dalton Transactions, from inorganic, organometallic, bioinorganic chemistry to photochemistry and inorganic materials.

28th October: Symposium hosted by Professor Osamu Ishitani

28th October: Symposium hosted by Professor Osamu Ishitani

With three locations combined (Fukuoka, Osaka and Tokyo), there were over 260 attendees with 3 international speakers from the UK, China and US. The Royal Society of Chemistry also had one representative speaker and there were 19 Japanese speakers from 10 difference institutions.

Further information about the symposium including a full list of speakers can be found on the website.

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MICRA2016 poster prize winner

Many congratulations to Dalton Transactions poster prize winner Dr Sophie Benjamin who was awarded at the MICRA2016 – Meeting of Inorganic Chemists Recently Appointed which took place at the University of Bath from the 5th – 7th September.

The meeting takes place every two years and brings together the UK’s community of early career researchers in inorganic chemistry along with experienced colleagues. The aim is to strengthen the UK’s inorganic community by helping junior academics to develop into successful, independent researchers through exchange of experiences and networking.

Further information about the meeting can be found on the webpage.

Sophie Benjamin

Dalton Transaction poster prize winner Dr Sophie Benjamin

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ISBOMC 16

Dalton Transactions will be providing sponsorship in the form of poster prizes for the 8th International Symposium on Bioorganometallic Chemistry which will take place in Moscow, Russia from the 4th – 8th September 2016. This will be the first time it has taken place in Russia. The symposium aims to consider all fields of Bioorganometallic Chemistry, from fundamental to applied areas, including multidisciplinary approaches.

Further information about the conference including speakers, registration, the advisory board can be found on the official website here.

conference logo

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