HOT articles for March

These articles are HOT as recommended by the referees. And we’ve made them free to access for the next 4 weeks!

Catalysis engineering of bifunctional solids for the one-step synthesis of liquid fuels from syngas: a review
Sina Sartipi, Michiel Makkee, Freek Kapteijn and Jorge Gascon
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014,4, 893-907
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY01021J

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 11th April 2014


Combining wet impregnation and dry sputtering to prepare highly-active CoPd/H-ZSM5 ternary catalysts applied for tandem catalytic synthesis of isoparaffins
Jian Sun, Wenqi Niu, Akira Taguchi, Takayuki Abe, Yoshiharu Yoneyama and Noritatsu Tsubaki  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY01091K

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 11th April 2014


Cooperation between the surface hydroxyl groups of Ru–SiO2@mSiO2 and water for good catalytic performance for hydrogenation of quinoline
Lei Zhang, Xiaoyan Wang, Ying Xue, Xiaojun Zeng, Hua Chen, Ruixiang Li and Shanling Wang  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY01071F

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 4th April 2014


Easily accessible bifunctional Zn(salpyr) catalysts for the formation of organic carbonates
C. Martín, C. J. Whiteoak, E. Martin, M. Martínez Belmonte, E. C. Escudero-Adán and A. W. Kleij
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY01043K

Graphical abstract

 

Free to access until 4th April 2014

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Top Ten most accessed Catalysis Science & Technology articles from October to December 2013

During October, November and December, the following articles were the Top Ten most accessed:

Graphene-based materials for catalysis
Bruno F. Machado and Philippe Serp  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2012, 2, 54-75
DOI: 10.1039/c1cy00361e

Single-layer MoS2 as an efficient photocatalyst
Yunguo Li, Yan-Ling Li, Carlos Moyses Araujo, Wei Luo and Rajeev Ahuja  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, 3, 2214-2220
DOI: 10.1039/c3cy00207a

Homogeneous hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to methanol
Yu-Nong Li, Ran Ma, Liang-Nian He and Zhen-Feng Diao  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/c3cy00564j

Metal organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts for the production of fine chemicals
Amarajothi Dhakshinamoorthy, Maksym Opanasenko, Jiří Čejka and Hermenegildo Garcia  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, 3, 2509-2540
DOI: 10.1039/c3cy00350g

Recent advances in the photocatalytic CO2 reduction over semiconductors
Jin Mao, Kan Li and Tianyou Peng  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, 3, 2481-2498
DOI: 10.1039/c3cy00345k

Gold Catalysis – the journey continues
A. Stephen K. Hashmi and Graham J. Hutchings  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, 3, 2861-2861
DOI: 10.1039/c3cy90026f

Remarkable Lewis acid catalytic performance of the scandium trimesate metal organic framework MIL-100(Sc) for C–C and CN bond-forming reactions
Laura Mitchell, Berenice Gonzalez-Santiago, John P. S. Mowat, Mary E. Gunn, Patrick Williamson, Nadia Acerbi, Matthew L. Clarke and Paul A. Wright  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, 3, 606-617
DOI: 10.1039/c2cy20577g

Metal sulphide semiconductors for photocatalytic hydrogen production
Kai Zhang and Liejin Guo  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, 3, 1672-1690
DOI: 10.1039/c3cy00018d

Photocatalytic water oxidation with cobalt-containing tungstobismutates: tuning the metal core
Fabio Evangelisti, Pierre-Emmanuel Car, Olivier Blacque and Greta R. Patzke  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, 3, 3117-3129
DOI: 10.1039/c3cy00475a

Challenge and progress: palladium-catalyzed sp3 C–H activation
Hu Li, Bi-Jie Li and Zhang-Jie Shi  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2011, 1, 191-206
DOI: 10.1039/c0cy00076k

Please leave your comments or thoughts on any of these articles in the comment box below.

Do you have an article that you would like to submit to Catalysis Science & Technology? Why not submit to us here today?

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Fastest journal in catalysis research

Catalysis Science & Technology publishes research faster than any other catalysis journal

CatSciTech Cover

The average time to publication for Catalysis Science & Technology is shorter than for any other high-impact catalysis journal*. In a recent survey by the Catalysis Science & Technology editorial office, the time between when an article is received and its first online publication was compared for all primary and secondary research articles published in ACS Catalysis, ChemCatChem, Journal of Catalysis and Catalysis Science & Technology in 2013.

The mean time to publication for Catalysis Science & Technology in 2013 was 65 days, more than 10 days faster than the next fastest journal. Our survey also highlighted that Catalysis Science & Technology’s times to publication are getting even shorter, as indicated by a mean time of just 55 days between September and December 2013.

Catalysis Science & Technology publishes 12 issues a year containing primary articles, communications, perspectives and mini reviews covering all fundamental science and technological aspects of catalysis. In addition to rapid publication times, our fair and impartial peer-review process means the content we publish is always of the highest possible quality.

Why not take advantage of the shortest time-to-publication in catalysis science and submit your next article to Catalysis Science & Technology?

* Defined as specialised journals publishing catalysis with an impact factor greater than 3.5

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Chromium complexes catalyse carbon dioxide/epoxide copolymerization

Homogeneous catalysts for the copolymerisation of carbon dioxide and epoxides encompass a wide range of main group and transition metal complexes; these often incorporate multidentate ligands such as porphyrins, salens, and salans, among other related classes. Amine-bis-phenolates are one class of ligands which have been employed as supporting scaffolds for polymerisation catalysts, providing tunability at the metal centre by functional group modifications at both the aromatic ring positions and on the neutral pendent donor atom. Recent research by the Kozak Group at Memorial University of Newfoundland has focussed on developing amine-bis(phenolate) complexes of mid-to-late transition metals as catalysts for this reaction. In a recent paper published in Catalysis Science & Technology, three six-coordinate chromium complexes with two types of pendent arm were evaluated as copolymerisation catalysts.

The most active catalyst in this study utilised a ligand featuring a coordinated tetrahydrofuranyl pendent group, while ligands featuring non-coordinating benzyl groups resulted in lower yields of the poly(cyclohexene carbonate) product. Although the polymer produced was atactic in all cases, the catalyst was found to be advantageous due to the high percentages of carbonate linkages prevailing in the final product with no evidence suggesting undesirable formation of cyclic carbonate formation.

Read the orginal paper below, which was also cited as a HOT article by the Catalysis Science & Technology referees:

Chromium(III) amine-bis(phenolate) complexes as catalysts for copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide and CO2
Hua Chen, Louise N. Dawe, and Christopher M. Kozak
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C3CY01002C


Jenna Flogeras

Jenna Flogeras obtained her B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of New Brunswick (Fredericton), Canada. She is currently working towards her Ph.D. at Memorial University of Newfoundland, under the supervision of Dr. Francesca Kerton. Her research is focused on the synthesis of biodegradable polymers using main-group metal complexes as catalysts.

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HOT articles for February

These articles are HOT as recommended by the referees. And we’ve made them free to access for the next 4 weeks!

Alkali- and nitrate-free synthesis of highly active Mg–Al hydrotalcite-coated alumina for FAME production
Julia J. Creasey, Alessandro Chieregato, Jinesh C. Manayil, Christopher M. A. Parlett, Karen Wilson and Adam F. Lee  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014,4, 861-870
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00902E

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 20th March 2014


Rearrangement of aldoximes to amides in water under air atmosphere catalyzed by water-soluble iridium complex [Cp*Ir(H2O)3][OTf]2
Chunlou Sun, Panpan Qu and Feng Li  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00934C

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 20th March 2014



Dimerization of ethene in a fluidized bed reactor using Ni-based Supported Ionic Liquid Phase (SILP) catalysts

Florian T. U. Kohler, Konstantin Gärtner, Veit Hager, Marco Haumann, Michelle Sternberg, Xinjiao Wang, Normen Szesni, Karsten Meyer and Peter Wasserscheid  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00905J

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 7th March 2014


Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of heterogeneously catalyzed oxidation reactions
Franziska Hess and Herbert Over  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00833A

Graphical abstract

 

Free to access until 7th March 2014

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Nature leads the way: A Biomimetic Tricopper complex as a catalyst for selective oxidation of smaller alkanes

2014 has arrived and with it a new batches of Hot Articles, one of which from January deserves special attention. Professor Sunny Chan’s group at Academia Sinica,  Taiwan have achieved the distinction of being the first group to devise a molecular catalyst for the selective oxidation of methane to methanol. This reaction faces a formidable challenge in the form of inertness of the methane C–H bond which makes O-atom insertion into the molecule almost impossible in ambient conditions.  Even if this problem is solved, the product, methanol, is highly susceptible to over-oxidation leading to formation of other undesired products. For of these reasons, most of the researchers have failed to scale this gargantuan mountain of difficulties.

Time and again when scientists have found it difficult to get answers to tough and challenging problems they have turned to nature for inspiration. In this case, the solution lay in a particular class of enzymes called methane monoxygenases (MMO) found in the methanotrophic bacteria. These MMOs have metallic clusters at their centres, which catalyse this difficult reaction with ease. In order to emulate these catalytic centres, the researchers developed some biomimetic models containing tricopper clusters, one of which, [CuICuICuI(7-N-Etppz)][ClO4], successfully mediated the selective oxidation of methane without any over-oxidation. This tricopper complex, when activated by dioxygen (O2), harnesses a “singlet oxene”, the strongest oxidant that could be used for a facile O-atom insertion across the C-H bond.

Biomimetic Tricopper complex as a catalyst for selective oxidation of methane to methanol

The catalyst also gave selectivity in the cases of ethane and propane, but not with higher alkanes. The reason being is the design of the tricopper catalyst, which has a small hydrophobic binding pocket at the base and forms a transient complex with the alkane and carries out the oxene transfer to oxidize the substrate. This pocket is not big enough to accommodate the product methanol (as well as the other small alcohols), so it releases the product as soon as it is formed. This removes over-oxidation from the equation, giving profound selectivity in cases of smaller alkanes. The authors have further studied the catalytic cycles and analysed the factors affecting the catalytic turnovers and efficiency.

This work presents a move towards a more efficient flow system which, in the future, would help in increasing the yields of the products. One issue with the current system is the solubility of the catalyst in solvents which can dissolve CH4 gas which may be put to rest by some modification in the design of the catalyst, leaving brighter prospects for the future.

To find out more about this nature-inspired discovery, read the full article now for more details.

Developing an efficient catalyst for controlled oxidation of small alkanes under ambient conditions
Penumaka Nagababu, Steve S.-F. Yu, Suman Maji, Ravirala Ramu and Sunney I. Chan
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00884C


Shreesha Bhat, Web Writer Shreesha Bhat is a M.S.(Pharm.) in Medicinal Chemistry from National Institute  of  Pharmaceutical Education and Research,  India. He has recently joined the research group of  Dr. Pallavi Sharma as a PhD student at the  University of Lincoln, UK. His project involves  the design and synthesis of Helicase-primase inhibitors for Herpes Simplex virus and development of useful synthetic methodologies.

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HOT articles for January

Homogeneous catalytic reduction of CO2 with hydrosilanes
Francisco J. Fernández-Alvarez, Abdullah M. Aitani and Luis A. Oro  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00948C       

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 28th February 2014


CO2 photoreduction with H2O vapor by porous MgO–TiO2 microspheres: effects of surface MgO dispersion and CO2 adsorption–desorption dynamics
Lianjun Liu, Cunyu Zhao, Daniel Pitts, Huilei Zhao and Ying Li  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00807J     

Graphical abstract   

Free to access until 28th February 2014


Chromium(III) amine-bis(phenolate) complexes as catalysts for copolymerization of cyclohexene oxide and CO2
Hua Chen, Louise N. Dawe and Christopher M. Kozak  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/c3cy01002c

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 21st February 2014


Self-regeneration of three-way catalyst rhodium supported on La-containing ZrO2 in an oxidative atmosphere
Hisaya Kawabata, Yuki Koda, Hirosuke Sumida, Masahiko Shigetsu, Akihide Takami and Kei Inumaru  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00838J

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 17th February 2014


Developing an efficient catalyst for controlled oxidation of small alkanes under ambient conditions
Penumaka Nagababu, Steve S.-F. Yu, Suman Maji, Ravirala Ramu and Sunney I. Chan  
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00884C

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 17th February 2014

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FineCat 2014 – Symposium on heterogeneous catalysis for fine chemicals

The 3rd FineCat Symposium will be held on 2-3 April 2014 in the Steri Palace, hall of Palermo’s University Rectorate, with plenary lectures from David Cole-Hamilton, Serge Kaliaguine, Paolo Fornasiero and Jose Antonio Lopez-Sanchez.

The conference is jointly organised by the Institute of Nanostructured Materials of Italy’s Research Council (CNR) and by Palermo’s University DEIM Department  and was born out of the 2011 Catalysis Science & Technology themed issue of ”Heterogeneous catalysis for fine chemicals” dedicated to Prof. Michele Rossi. It aims to provide opportunities for contact between academic and industrial researchers, manufacturers and users of solid catalysts for the efficient and selective production of fine chemicals.

The dealine for oral and poster abstracts is 3rd February 2014. Register now!

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Synthesis of cyclic carbonates catalysed by aluminium heteroscorpionate complexes

The potential of carbon dioxide to serve as a sustainable feedstock on an industrial scale is exemplified by the reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides to form cyclic carbonates. These products possess commercial value as both solvents and electrolytes in lithium ion batteries. 

In their latest Catalysis Science & Technology article, Michael North of the University of York, UK, and Antonio Otero from the Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, Spain, and colleagues investigate using bi- and trimetallic aluminium heteroscorpionate catalysts to drive this carbonate synthesis. 

Heteroscorpionate aluminium complexThe authors subjected nineteen complexes to a screening process which involved successive elimination based on their initial reactivity towards styrene oxide. The catalysts differed in their nuclearities and included either alkyl or phenoxide ligands, in addition to having one or more bis-pyrazole ligands. They found that the bi- and trinuclear catalysts, in the presence of a tetrabutylammonium bromide co-catalyst, exhibited the highest conversions of monomer at 10 bar pressure and room temperature; thus, the authors subsequently tested these six complexes at 1 bar pressure. Among these, a trimetallic, alkyl aluminium complex gave complete conversion to styrene carbonate and was subjected to further optimization studies. 

The team of researchers also studied the effect of water on the reaction to elucidate the catalytically active species. They discovered that a small amount of water (0.75 mol % or less) produced no effect, pointing towards the presence of a partially hydrolyzed, oligomeric structure containing bridging aluminium units. Although ineffective for the transformation of more challenging internal epoxides, the optimized catalyst proved to be highly efficient towards a variety of terminal epoxides. By performing mechanistic studies, it appeared that the reaction follows first order kinetics, implying that cooperative catalysis between aluminium ions does not occur. 

This synergistic catalytic system, comprised of equimolar amounts of a trimetallic aluminium complex and tetrabutylammonium bromide, was determined to be the third most active catalyst for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from terminal epoxides under ambient conditions. 

Read this Hot article now: 

Synthesis of cyclic carbonates catalysed by aluminium heteroscorpionate complexes
José A. Castro-Osma, Carlos Alonso-Moreno, Agustín Lara-Sánchez, Javier Martinez, Michael North, and Antonio Otero
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C3CY00810J 

This article is also part of the upcoming themed issue Catalytic Conversion and Use of Carbon Dioxide for Value-Added Organics - to be published Spring 2014.


Jenna Flogeras Jenna Flogeras obtained her M.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of New Brunswick (Fredericton), Canada. She is currently working towards her Ph.D. at Memorial University of Newfoundland, under the supervision of Dr Francesca Kerton. Her research is focused on the synthesis of biodegradable polymers using main-group metal complexes as catalysts.
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Catalysis Science & Technology – celebrating a successful year

Last year we celebrated Catalysis Science & Technology’s first ever impact factor – 3.75. This signified the journal’s prominent entrance into the publishing arena; in which Catalysis Science & Technology has quickly established itself as a high impact journal for top quality catalysis research. We are delighted that the catalysis community also shares our sentiment for the journal, as evidenced by the increasing numbers of submissions from authors. In 2013, we published over 350 articles in print issues – 46 Communications, 290 full papers, 37 Perspective and Mini Review articles, and 3 Comments. A selection of our top-read review articles is shown below (Table 1).    

Table 1 Top downloaded 2013 Perspective and Mini Review articles   


Title Authors
Metal sulphide semiconductors for photocatalytic hydrogen production Kai Zhang and Liejin Guo  
New trends in the synthesis of crystalline microporous materials Giuseppe Bellussi, Angela Carati, Caterina Rizzo and Roberto Millini  
Catalytic activity of unsupported gold nanoparticles Yusuke Mikami, Amarajothi Dhakshinamoorthy, Mercedes Alvaro and Hermenegildo García  
Emerging catalytic processes for the production of adipic acid Stijn Van de Vyver and Yuriy Román-Leshkov  
Epoxidation of olefins with homogeneous catalysts – quo vadis? Simone A. Hauser, Mirza Cokoja and Fritz E. Kühn  


   

As Catalysis Science & Technology steps out of its infancy, quality is as strong a focus as ever. Our dedicated Associate Editors are integral to this goal. In our last Editorial we introduced Professor Tsunehiro Tanaka to the Catalysis Science & Technology team, as Professor Noritaka Mizuno stepped up to join Professor Piet van Leeuwen as Co-Editor-in-Chief. Authors can choose to submit to one of 4 Editorial Offices covering the breadth of catalysis science disciplines (Fig. 1).  

Fig. 1 Catalysis Science & Technology’s Associate Editors.

The Royal Society of Chemistry launched Catalysis Science & Technology to meet the community’s request for a society catalysis journal. In keeping with this and our worldwide readership, we strive to deliver content to benefit the entire catalysis community. Fig. 2 illustrates the diversity of subject areas that we publish, which is also reflected by our themed issues. In 2013, we published issues focusing on environmentally benign catalytic oxidation – guest edited by Alfons Baiker and Tamas Mallat; photocatalysis – guest edited by Licheng Sun and Kazunari Domen; and gold catalysis – guest edited by Graham Hutchings and Stephen Hashmi. We’re equally as excited by next year’s line-up which includes Catalytic Conversion and Use of Carbon Dioxide for Value-Added Organics – guest edited by Arjan Kleij; Sustainable Catalytic Conversions of Renewable Substrates – guest edited by Pieter Bruijinicx and Yuriy Román-Leshkov; and Mechanistic Studies in Catalysis – guest edited by John Brown, Andreas Pfaltz and Rutger van Santen. Two out of the three have an environmental-twist, and each will have representation from both homogeneous and heterogeneous author communities. 

 

 

Fig. 2 Subject area breakdown of Catalysis Science & Technology’s 2013 published articles.   

We know that it is our talented community that keeps quality consistently high so getting out of the office to meet people is a high priority for us. This past year, we enjoyed meeting with researchers at the 23rd North American Catalysis Society meeting; EuropaCat; the 20th EuCheMS conference on organometallic chemistry; the Organometallic Chemistry Gordon Research Conference as well as both of the ACS National Meetings. We were also proud to offer sponsorship at a number of these meetings in addition to providing several poster prizes.   

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s not-for-profit ethos extends beyond our journal communities – in 2012, over 60 of our member groups each received grants of £1000 to arrange events and activities to promote the chemical sciences. These had an international nature and ranged from workshops for migrant children in Beijing and a science fair on water chemistry in southern India to supporting chemistry education in tsunami-affected areas in Sri Lanka.   

By publishing with Catalysis Science & Technology, you’ll be supporting the wider scientific community and future generations of chemical scientists.   

Looking for a New Year’s resolution? Raise your profile and benefit your research through the Royal Society of Chemistry.   

Many happy returns for 2014!   

Fiona McKenzie and Jamie Humphrey
Deputy Editor & Managing Editor

  

Download the pdf here 

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