Author Archive

From January 2013, Catalysis Science & Technology will be available by subscription only

The first 2 Volumes of Catalysis Science & Technology are free to access to all, but from Volume 3 onwards you will need either institutional access or a personal subscription to view all of our content.

 

Is your subscription in place for a smooth transition in the New Year? If not, recommend this journal to your librarian or information specialist.

You don’t want to miss out on great articles such as:

Graphene-based materials for catalysis
Bruno F. Machado and Philippe Serp
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2012, 2, 54-75

Challenge and progress: palladium-catalyzed sp3 C–H activation
Hu Li, Bi-Jie Li and Zhang-Jie Shi
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2011, 1, 191-206

Theoretical study on the leaching of palladium in a CO atmosphere
Chun-Ran Chang, Zhi-Jian Zhao, Klaus Köhler, Alexander Genest, Jun Li and Notker Rösch
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2012, 2, 2238-2248

Metal–organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts for oxidation reactions
Amarajothi Dhakshinamoorthy, Mercedes Alvaro and Hermenegildo Garcia
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2011, 1, 856-867

Design of hierarchical zeolite catalysts by desilication
Danny Verboekend and Javier Pérez-Ramírez
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2011, 1, 879-890

Heterogeneous catalysis of the glycerol hydrogenolysis
Yoshinao Nakagawa and Keiichi Tomishige
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2011, 1, 179-190

Conversion of lignocellulose into renewable chemicals by heterogeneous catalysis
Hirokazu Kobayashi, Hidetoshi Ohta and Atsushi Fukuoka
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2012, 2, 869-883

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New trends in the synthesis of crystalline microporous materials

Microporous materials have a wide range of applications, industrially used as catalysts, molecular sieves and ion-exchangers, zeolites are an important class of microporous material that have generated a huge amount of academic and industrial interest in modern times. With over 200 framework types officially recognized by the Structure Commission of the International Zeolite Association, there is also wide diversity in chemical structure and functionality.

This Hot Perspective by Roberto Millini et al. summarises the latest developments in the field of zeolites, with a focus on areas of innovation such as synthetic procedures, framework composition, hybrid materials and morphologies.

This article is free to download, but only for a limited time…………………… As of January 2013 Catalysis Science & Technology is available by subscription only.

New trends in the synthesis of crystalline microporous materials
Giuseppe Bellussi, Angela Carati, Caterina Rizzo and Roberto Millini
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2CY20510F

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C-H activation: an article collection

One of the simplest and most utilised chemical reactions is the burning of hydrocarbons and while combustion is an excellent way to exploit the energy content of this naturally occurring resource, there is a lot more we can do with the ‘inert’ C-H bond.

C-H activation allows us to convert cheaper hydrocarbon starting materials into more valuable and versatile products; leading to the development of a wide range of reagents and catalysts that activate C-H bonds. To keep you up to date with the latest developments in the field we have created this article collection, where all articles are free to download until 15th December.

Click here for the full list of articles

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Hydroformylation for the higher alkenes

Hydroformylation (or the oxo process) is an important industrial procedure which combines alkenes with carbon monoxide and hydrogen to produce aldehydes, which are easily hydrogenated to alcohols and then plasticizers or detergents. Hydroformylation is used to produce around 9 million tons of aldehyde per year world-wide and is one of the largest industrial applications of homogeneous catalysis.

Alternative approaches for the aqueous–organic biphasic hydroformylation of higher alkenes

Catalyst recycling is highly desirable to reduce costs and was effectively implemented for short chain alkenes with the development of the aqueous biphasic Ruhrchemie/Rhone-Poulenc (RCH/RP) process, however due to mass-transfer limitations the application of this process is constrained to the short chain hydrocarbons. This Hot Perspective by Lorenz Obrecht, Paul C. J. Kamer and Wouter Laan details some of the alternative approaches which have been developed for the aqueous–organic biphasic hydroformylation for higher alkenes.

Alternative approaches for the aqueous–organic biphasic hydroformylation of higher alkenes
Lorenz Obrecht, Paul C. J. Kamer and Wouter Laan
Catal. Sci. Technol., 2013, Advance Article

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FineCat 2013 – Symposium on heterogeneous catalysis for fine chemicals

FineCat 2013Following the success of the 2012 edition, the 2013 FineCat Symposium will be held on April 2013 in the splendid conference venue of the Steri Palace, hall of Palermo’s University Rectorate. The meeting aims to provide an opportunity for contact between academic and industrial researchers, manufacturers and users of solid catalysts for the efficient and selective production of fine chemicals.

The following eminent scientists have confirmed their Symposium attendance as plenary lecturers in 2013:

Claudio Bianchini (CNR, Italy): Electrochemical Valorisation of Alcohols
D. Tyler McQuade (Florida State University): A Flow Chemistry Approach to Catalysis

Call for Papers and Abstract Submission
A call for Oral and Poster presentation is now open within one of the 2013 Symposium themes:

  • Green catalytic processes
  • Organo- and biocatalysis
  • Selective photocatalysis for organic chemistry
  • Asymmetric heterogeneous catalysis
  • Atom economy and clean technology
  • Green reaction media
  • Heterogeneous catalysis under flow conditions

For more details about the symposium, including how to submit your abstract and register to attend FineCat 2013, visit the website.

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RSC poster prizes awarded at Carbohydrate COST Meeting 2012

Congratulations to Dirk Heyl (Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry), Richard Blackburn (Chemical Science) and Hilde van Hattum (Catalysis Science & Technology) who were the winners of the RSC poster prizes at the RSC Carbohydrate COST Meeting held at University of Birmingham on September 27th-28th

Congratulations also go to Myriam Bergmann for winning the Buchanan Memorial Prize for best student talk, and to Professor David Bundle for being awarded the Haworth Medal. 

Thank you to Professor Nigel Simpkins & Professor Rob Field for presenting the prizes, and to all those who participated for making this a success.

View more photos of the winners here

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Frontiers of Organometallic Chemistry (FOC-2012)

Last month ‘Frontiers of Organometallic Chemistry’ was held in Saint Petersburg and saw researchers from around the world come together to talk about the latest developments in organometallic chemistry. Nobel laureate Professor Ei-ichi Negishi opened the conference with his talk ‘ZACA Reaction (Zr-Catalyzed Asymmetric Carboalumination of Alkenes) as an Emerging Tool for Asymmetric Synthesis of Feebly Chiral Compounds of High (>99%) Enantiomeric Purity’. The symposium continued with top quality talks by researchers from around the world, more details of the conference speakers can be found here.

Professor Vadim Yu Kukushkin, Saint-Petersburg State University, discussing the posters

The prize winners with Professor Kukushkin after the award ceremony

G.A. Silantyev receiving a copy of ‘Organometallic Chemistry’ and a certificate, winning first prize

Catalysis Science & Tehcnology was very pleased to sponsor the poster prizes for this great international event, congratulations to the winners:

1st Prize: G.A. Silantyev “Structural peculiarities of dibenzobarrelene-based PCP pincer iridium complexes”

2nd Prize: W. Harnying “Zwitterionic-type molten salt: an efficient mild organocatalyst for synthesis of 2-aryl-5-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1h-3-pyrazolones by a four- component sequential reaction in water”

3rd Prize: N.A. Bumagin “A highly active heterogeneous palladium catalysts supported on silica-carbon nanotubes hybrids”

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Biocatalysis: an article collection

Beers, wines and cheeses are enjoyed around the world today and have been for millennia. In fact the practices of brewing and cheese-making pre-date recorded history so it is difficult to accurately determine when we first started using naturally occurring enzymes and microorganisms to create valuable (and in this case, tastier!) products.

Biocatalysts are of course used in far more diverse applications than the creation of food-stuffs, including in many organic syntheses and in the generation of fine chemicals. Due to their natural design, they can offer superior selectivity for particular products and have a far lower environmental impact than many traditional catalysts. Our knowledge and understanding of biocatalysts has increased dramatically in the last few decades, which has allowed us to develop biologically modified and biomimetic catalysts for a range of applications.

To keep you up to date with the latest advances in this rapidly expanding field we have collected together these high impact articles and made them free to access until the 31st October!

Click here for the full list of free articles

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Shedding light on photosynthesis reactions

 

RSC Book of the month

Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: A Carrefour of Chemical Reactivity

It has been 100 years, almost to the day, since Italian Chemist Giacomo Luigi Ciamician first proposed harnessing the sun’s power to produce energy.  Writing in Science, Ciamician stated “And if in a distant future the supply of coal becomes completely exhausted, civilization will not be checked by that, for life and civilization will continue as long as the sun shines!”.  With these words in mind, we have selected Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: A Carrefour of Chemical Reactivity edited by Sebastiao Formosinho and Monica Barroso as the October book of the month. 

Amongst other topics, this fascinating book discusses both natural and artificial photosynthesis and highlights the importance of proton-coupled electron transfer in biological systems, in particularly for bioenergetic conversion. 

The book gives a good insight into current research on a vibrant topic. It is to be expected that it will be the first in a long upcoming list of publications, given the importance of PCET processes such as the activation of water, production of H2, reduction of CO2, and reduction of N2.”  Reviewed in Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

Using personal accounts of experimental examples this book will provide a unique insight into the current understanding of this important reaction type.

Let the sun shine on your reactions.

Interested in other books on catalysis? Read more in the RSC Catalysis Series.

You may also be interested in the latest themed issue of Energy & Environmental Science on ‘Proton-coupled electron transfer’ .

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Organometallics in catalysis: an article collection

Perhaps the most well-known applications of organometallics in catalysis are the Ziegler–Natta catalysts which are used to generate polymers, the catalysts are made up of mixtures of transition metal halides and organo-aluminium complexes. Karl Ziegler and Giulio Natta were awarded the 1963 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their discovery and development of the catalysts, which today are the most commonly used for the manufacture of polythene.

The esteemed history of organometallics are not to be under-estimated and include Grignard’s reagents, the Heck reaction, Schrock catalysts, Grubbs’ catalysts and the Suzuki Coupling to name just a few. Organometallic compounds have revolutionised science and industry and to keep you up to date with the latest break-through research being made across all areas of organometallics in catalysis, we have made this cross-journal article collection free until the 26th September.

Click here for the full list of free articles

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