Archive for the ‘Themed Issues’ Category

Developments in bioorthogonal protein chemistry

This review article by Chen et al., based at Peking University in Beijing, encompasses a wide range of recent work on bioorthogonal protein chemistry mediated by transition metals in living cells.

The definition of bioorthogonal chemistry is a reaction which can take place inside a living system without disrupting the biological processes surrounding it. The reactants must be inert to any molecules or biomolecules in the surrounding environment, selective in their reaction with each other and non-toxic. The aim of bioorthogonal reactions is to label or influence a key biomolecule so that either it, or its effects, can be tracked. Successful bioorthogonal reactions will allow for the study of biomolecules such as proteins within living systems, in real time. This review focuses on recent work by groups who have significantly contributed to protein chemistry and have widened the scope of bioorthogonal reactions.

Unsurprisingly, most reaction conditions do not meet the strict criteria of bioorthogonal reactions. The use of transition metals is discussed with a focus on the well-known Cu(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) which is described as a ‘hallmark of bioorthogonal chemistry’ due to its high specificity, reaction rate and selectivity. The triazole product is stable and unreactive but this reaction is prevented from being bioorthogonal by the toxicity of the Cu(I) ions.

Chen and co-workers review research focused on overcoming the toxicity problems seen with Cu(I), including the strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). This work developed by Bertozzi et al. is a ‘copper-free’ version of the CuAAC reaction. Chen et al. additionally discuss their own work, on ligand-assisted CuAAC reactions, using a BTTAA ligand (2-[4-({bis[(1-tert-butyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)methyl]amino}methyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl]acetic acid) to reduce toxicity. The authors also assess the use of other transition metals, such as palladium, as replacements for copper in bioorthogonal conjugation reactions, both on the cell surface and within an intracellular environment.
bioorthogonal protein chemistry
Ligand-assisted CuAAC labelling of proteins in the bacterial periplasm.

To download the full article for free* click the link below:
Maiyun Yang, Jie Li and Peng R. Chen
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00646A

This article is part of the Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigators themed issue, which showcases up-and-coming scientists who are internationally recognised for making outstanding contributions to their respective fields.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register
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Applied Computational Chemistry Themed Issue

Applied Computational ChemsitryWe are delighted to introduce Issue 14 as a themed issue on Applied Computational Chemistry, published in honour of the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry, which was awarded to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.

The issue’s foreword is written by Kendall N. Houk and guest editors Israel Fernández and Fernando P. Cossío who introduce the themed issue in their editorial.

Over the last decades, computations chemistry had become a powerful tool in Chemistry, so we hope you enjoy reading the issue. For the full collection, click on the link below:

Applied Computational Chemistry
Chemical Society Reviews
Issue 14
Page 4897 to 5142

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Supramolecular Photochemistry Themed Issue

Chemical Society Reviews is delighted to present a themed issue on supramolecular photochemistry, dedicated to Professor Nick Turro, who sadly passed away in 2012. To celebrate Turro’s enormous contribution to photochemical sciences,  guest editor Alberto Credi has gathered together the most prominent, recent advances in photochemistry at its frontiers with supramolecular chemistry, materials science, and biochemistry.

To read the full collection, click on the link below:

Chemical Society Reviews, Issue 12, Supramolecular Photochemistry
Guest Editor: Alberto Credi

We hope you enjoy reading this collection as much as we did!

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MOF2014: Poster abstract deadline 30 June

MOF2014
28 September – 1 October 2014, Kobe, Japan

Deadline of poster abstract submission: 30 June

Our forthcoming Chem Soc Rev themed issue on Metal Organic Frameworks will be promoted at the forthcoming MOF2014 Conference, with all delegates receiving a free USB flash drive with a copy of the whole MOFs themed issue. The guest editors are Susumu Kitagawa (Kyoto University), Chair of MOF2014, and (Joe Zhou, Texas A&M University).

Keynote Speakers:
Xiao-Ming Chen, Sun-Yat-Sen University/PRC
Andrew Cooper, University of Liverpool/UK
Roland Fischer, Ruhr-University Bochum/Ger
Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley/USA
George Shimizu, University of Calgary/Can
Myunghyun Paik Suh, Seoul National University/RoK
Qiang Xu, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)/Jpn
Omar Yaghi, University of California, Berkeley/USA

Submit your poster abstract for MOF2014

Preview Chem Soc Rev themed issue on Metal Organic Frameworks

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Chem Soc Rev Chair wins the Supramolecular Chemistry Award

Philip Gale, chair of the Chem Soc Rev Editorial Board, has won the 2014 Supramolecular Chemistry Award for his outstanding body of work on small organic molecules containing hydrogen bond donor arrays for selective guest complexation, and the design and study of minimalist anion transporters.

Supramolecular Chemistry Award 2014 WinnerPhil was delighted to receive this award from the Royal Society of Chemistry. “My group is working to find new ways of treating cancer and cystic fibrosis using anion transporters and I am delighted that the hard work and dedication of my students and post-docs has been recognised in this way,” he says.

We would like to congratulate Phil on this achievement and take this opportunity to thank him for his excellent contributions towards the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship reviews journal, Chem Soc Rev which continues to publish high-impact, succinct and reader-friendly articles at the forefront of the chemical sciences.

Phil’s research paper, published in Chemical Science earlier this year , describes a new design principle for transmembrane anion carrier and is free* to access, so click the link below to download it in full.

Lipophilic balance – a new design principle for transmembrane anion carriers
Hennie Valkenier, Cally J. E. Haynes, Julie Herniman, Philip A. Gale and Anthony P. Davis
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52962B

Phil has published several papers in RSC Journals this year including his most recent communication in Chem Comm on the tripodal molecules for the promotion of phosphoester hydrolysis. Many of his papers are free to download as they have been published via open access, you can visit his author archive to view the full collection.

All articles in the dedicated themed collection of papers celebrating the 2014 RSC Prize and Award winners are free* to access until 6th June.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Nanoplasmonics

Our current Chem Soc Rev issue is a themed issue on nanoplasmonics, guest edited by Luis Liz-Marzan, Catherine Murphy and Jianfang Wang.

Nanoplasmonics concerns light-matter interactions with nanoscale materials.  Advances in fabrication, computation, and applications ranging from biomedicine to energy have burgeoned in the last 5 years. This themed issue gathers together a variety of reviews and tutorial reviews covering all chemical aspects of the field, from synthesis and fabrication to plasmon-enhanced effects in physical and biological systems.

To read the full editorial for free, click the link below:

Nanoplasmonics
Luis M. Liz-Marzán, Catherine J. Murphy and Jianfang Wang
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS90026J

If you are interested in Nanoplasmonics, why not register for the Faraday Discussion in London, February 2015.

This meeting aims to highlight the most recent breakthroughs in the multidisciplinary field of nanoplasmonics. The following themes will be covered:

  • Plasmonic nanoparticles and metamaterials with designed optical properties
  • Surface plasmon enhanced spectroscopies
  • Quantum plasmonics, gain and spasers
  • Biosensing and biomedical applications of plasmonics

Faraday Discussions have a special format where research papers written by the speakers are distributed to all participants before the meeting, and most of the meeting is devoted to discussing the papers. Click the link to find out more about the Nanoplasmonics Faraday Discussion.

The oral abstract deadline is Monday 19th May 2014 – so don’t delay submit your oral abstract today! You can view details of the other submission deadlines on the Abstract Submission homepage.

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Themed Issue: Mechanochemistry

C3CS90058DWe are delighted to present the Chem Soc Rev themed issue on mechanochemistry.

Guest editors Stuart James and Tomislav Friščić introduce the issue in their Editorial.

Although mechanochemistry as a phenomenon has been recognised for a long time, its application with regard to chemical synthesis has traditionally been limited to the area of insoluble inorganic materials. However, James and Friščić point towards a growing realisation that it is also applicable to molecular, soluble reactants, and that it may even offer advantages over the solvent-based methods historically used in that area.

C3CS90071AThis themed issue includes reviews focussing on both understanding the phenomenon itself (e.g., processes of mechanochemical bond breaking, the effects of mechanochemistry on the structures of materials, and factors underlying the molecular-level mechanisms), as well as the application of mechanochemistry to actual chemical synthesis, such as by grinding or milling.

Together with our guest editors, we hope this special issue of excellent Review Articles and Tutorial Reviews will serve as a consolidated overview to many of the most significant advances in the field.

Browse all the reviews from this themed issue online –

Mechanochemistry

ChemComm Mechanochemistry web collection

James and Friščić also guest edit our ChemComm web themed issue on mechanochemistry, highlighting recent cutting-edge achievements in this exciting field.  Read this fantastic collection of Feature Articles and Communications now:

Mechanochemistry: fundamentals and applications in synthesis

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Themed Issue: Stimuli responsive materials

We are delighted to present the Chem Soc Rev themed issue on stimuli responsive materials.

Guest editors Patrick Theato, Brent Sumerlin, Rachel O’Reilly and Thomas Epps III introduce the issue in their Editorial.

C3CS90057FMany applications in technology, biology, and society do benefit from materials with increased functionality and adaptability. As a result, according to Theato, Sumerlin, O’Reilly and Epps, materials science has rapidly evolved to meet these demands by enabling the preparation and increased fundamental understanding of responsive materials with adaptable properties and behaviours.

C3CS90067C

Together with our guest editors, we hope this special issue of excellent Review Articles and Tutorial Reviews will serve as a consolidated overview to many of the most important recent advances in the field.

Browse all the reviews from this themed issue online –

Stimuli responsive materials

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Chem Soc Rev reviews in 2013 Cancer Nanotechnology collection– free till 28 July

We are pleased to present a web collection of articles from publications across the RSC journal portfolio demonstrating the use of (nano)technology in the diagnosis, imaging and treatment of cancer.

This web collection will be free to access until the 28th July, so register for an RSC Publishing personal account and read this cutting edge research for free this week!

Read these Chem Soc Rev reviews as part of this special cancer nanotechnology collection:

Cytokines as biomarkers of nanoparticle immunotoxicity
Mahmoud Elsabahy and Karen L. Wooley
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 5552-5576
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60064E

Glyconanotechnology
Niels C. Reichardt, Manuel Martín-Lomas and Soledad Penadés
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 4358-4376
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35427F

Cancer detection using nanoparticle-based sensors
Maëlle Perfézou, Anthony Turner and Arben Merkoçi
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 2606-2622
DOI: 10.1039/C1CS15134G

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Themed Issue: Multivalent scaffolds in glycosciences

We are delighted to present the Chem Soc Rev themed issue on multivalent scaffolds in glycosciences .

Guest editors Olivier Renaudet and René Roy introduce the issue in their Editorial.

C3CS90029K

Multivalent interactions between carbohydrates and proteins are involved in major physiological and pathological processes.  According to Renaudet and Roy, with the recent emergence of glycomics, the development of glycoclusters and glycodendrimers capable of mimicking the multivalent display of the cell surface glycocalix has become a major field of research due to their evident interest as diagnostic and therapeutic tool. C3CS90038JA large variety of scaffolds are now available for the multivalent presentation of carbohydrates.

This themed issue contains an excellent collection of Review Articles and Tutorial Reviews which highlights recent advances focused on the chemistry and applications of such multivalent glycosylated structures.

Browse all the reviews from this themed issue online –

Multivalent scaffolds in glycosciences

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