Archive for the ‘Themed Issues’ Category

Themed Issue: Mechanochemistry

C3CS90058DWe are delighted to present the Chem Soc Rev themed issue on mechanochemistry.

Guest editors Stuart James and Tomislav Friščić introduce the issue in their Editorial.

Although mechanochemistry as a phenomenon has been recognised for a long time, its application with regard to chemical synthesis has traditionally been limited to the area of insoluble inorganic materials. However, James and Friščić point towards a growing realisation that it is also applicable to molecular, soluble reactants, and that it may even offer advantages over the solvent-based methods historically used in that area.

C3CS90071AThis themed issue includes reviews focussing on both understanding the phenomenon itself (e.g., processes of mechanochemical bond breaking, the effects of mechanochemistry on the structures of materials, and factors underlying the molecular-level mechanisms), as well as the application of mechanochemistry to actual chemical synthesis, such as by grinding or milling.

Together with our guest editors, we hope this special issue of excellent Review Articles and Tutorial Reviews will serve as a consolidated overview to many of the most significant advances in the field.

Browse all the reviews from this themed issue online –

Mechanochemistry

ChemComm Mechanochemistry web collection

James and Friščić also guest edit our ChemComm web themed issue on mechanochemistry, highlighting recent cutting-edge achievements in this exciting field.  Read this fantastic collection of Feature Articles and Communications now:

Mechanochemistry: fundamentals and applications in synthesis

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Themed Issue: Stimuli responsive materials

We are delighted to present the Chem Soc Rev themed issue on stimuli responsive materials.

Guest editors Patrick Theato, Brent Sumerlin, Rachel O’Reilly and Thomas Epps III introduce the issue in their Editorial.

C3CS90057FMany applications in technology, biology, and society do benefit from materials with increased functionality and adaptability. As a result, according to Theato, Sumerlin, O’Reilly and Epps, materials science has rapidly evolved to meet these demands by enabling the preparation and increased fundamental understanding of responsive materials with adaptable properties and behaviours.

C3CS90067C

Together with our guest editors, we hope this special issue of excellent Review Articles and Tutorial Reviews will serve as a consolidated overview to many of the most important recent advances in the field.

Browse all the reviews from this themed issue online –

Stimuli responsive materials

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chem Soc Rev reviews in 2013 Cancer Nanotechnology collection– free till 28 July

We are pleased to present a web collection of articles from publications across the RSC journal portfolio demonstrating the use of (nano)technology in the diagnosis, imaging and treatment of cancer.

This web collection will be free to access until the 28th July, so register for an RSC Publishing personal account and read this cutting edge research for free this week!

Read these Chem Soc Rev reviews as part of this special cancer nanotechnology collection:

Cytokines as biomarkers of nanoparticle immunotoxicity
Mahmoud Elsabahy and Karen L. Wooley
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 5552-5576
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60064E

Glyconanotechnology
Niels C. Reichardt, Manuel Martín-Lomas and Soledad Penadés
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 4358-4376
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35427F

Cancer detection using nanoparticle-based sensors
Maëlle Perfézou, Anthony Turner and Arben Merkoçi
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 2606-2622
DOI: 10.1039/C1CS15134G

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Themed Issue: Multivalent scaffolds in glycosciences

We are delighted to present the Chem Soc Rev themed issue on multivalent scaffolds in glycosciences .

Guest editors Olivier Renaudet and René Roy introduce the issue in their Editorial.

C3CS90029K

Multivalent interactions between carbohydrates and proteins are involved in major physiological and pathological processes.  According to Renaudet and Roy, with the recent emergence of glycomics, the development of glycoclusters and glycodendrimers capable of mimicking the multivalent display of the cell surface glycocalix has become a major field of research due to their evident interest as diagnostic and therapeutic tool. C3CS90038JA large variety of scaffolds are now available for the multivalent presentation of carbohydrates.

This themed issue contains an excellent collection of Review Articles and Tutorial Reviews which highlights recent advances focused on the chemistry and applications of such multivalent glycosylated structures.

Browse all the reviews from this themed issue online –

Multivalent scaffolds in glycosciences

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

The ins and outs of enzyme immobilisation: a Tutorial Review

Great attention is focused on the burgeoning role of biocatalysis in industrial processes.  Enzymes offer a mild, efficient and “green” process that can save money, conserve energy and cut down on waste compared to conventional chemistry.  However, despite their advantages, the implementation of enzymatic processes in industry suffers from a number of limitations.  Enzymes are often unstable to the industrial or storage conditions, and can be difficult to recover and re-use.

Enzyme immobilisation is one way to combat these drawbacks.  In addition to facilitating the storage, recovery and re-use of an enzyme, immobilisation also affords the more convenient handling of the enzyme as well as reducing its toxicity in cases. As part of Chem Soc Rev’s upcoming ‘Enzyme Immobilisation’ themed issue, Professor Roger A. Sheldon and Dr. Sander van Pelt of Delft University of Technology have produced a Tutorial Review shedding light on the role of this key application in biocatalysis.

Enzyme Immobilization: Why, What and How | Roger A. Sheldon

The Tutorial Review – which is accompanied by additional PDF slides in the electronic supplementary information (ESI) – highlights a number of key learning points, including the advantages and limitations of the various approaches to enzyme immobilisation.  The types of immobilisation are discussed in detail, from binding to a carrier, to entrapment and cross-linking, including cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs).  Helpfully, Sheldon and von Pelt also clarify immobilisation terminology, which is often confusing and inconsistent.

Given the potential of this technology, especially in the chemical industry, it is essential that we gain more insight into the performance and application of immobilised enzymes.  This Tutorial Review is a step towards that objective and offers an enlightening overview of this fascinating subject.

For more, read this Chemical Society Reviews article today:

Enzyme immobilisation in biocatalysis: why, what and how
Roger A. Sheldon and Sander van Pelt
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, Advance Article
DOI:10.1039/C3CS60075K

Ruth Gilligan is a guest web-writer for Chem Soc Rev.  She has recently completed her PhD in the group of Prof. Matthew J. Gaunt at the University of Cambridge, focusing on the development and application of C–H functionalisation methodology.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Carbohydrate chemistry themed issue

We are delighted to present Chem Soc Rev’s themed issue on Carbohydrate chemistry – now available online.

Guest editors Injae Shin and Kwan Soo Kim, both from Yonsei University in Seoul, introduce the issue in their Editorial.

This issue contains an excellent collection of Review Articles and Tutorial Reviews which highlights recent advances in glycochemistry and chemical glycobiology, including:

Review Articles

Chemical approaches to study O-GlcNAcylation
Partha S. Banerjee, Gerald W. Hart and Jin Won Cho
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 4345-4357
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35412H

Glyconanotechnology
Niels C. Reichardt, Manuel Martín-Lomas and Soledad Penadés
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 4358-4376
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35427F

The development of synthetic antitumour vaccines from mucin glycopeptide antigens
Nikola Gaidzik, Ulrika Westerlind and Horst Kunz
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 4421-4442
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS35470A

Guest editors-C3CS90030DGlycopolymer probes of signal transduction
Laura L. Kiessling and Joseph C. Grim
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 4476-4491
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60097A

Tutorial Reviews

Chemical probing of glycans in cells and organisms
Sara H. Rouhanifard, Lars Ulrik Nordstrøm, Tianqing Zheng and Peng Wu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 4284-4296
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35416K

Fluoro-C-glycosides and fluoro-carbasugars, hydrolytically stable and synthetically challenging glycomimetics
Eric Leclerc, Xavier Pannecoucke, Mélanie Ethève-Quelquejeu and Matthieu Sollogoub
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 4270-4283
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35403A

Browse all the reviews from this themed issue online – Carbohydrate chemistry

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

20 Years of Mesoporous Materials

We are delighted to present this themed issue of Chem Soc Rev which celebrates 20 years of mesoporous materials.

Guest editors Bénédicte Lebeau, Anne Galarneau and Mika Linden introduce the issue in their Editorial and Charles T. Kresge and Wieslaw J. Roth discuss their contribution to this exciting field in their Highlight article:

Highlight
The discovery of mesoporous molecular sieves from the twenty year perspective
Charles T. Kresge and Wieslaw J. Roth
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60016E

This bumper issue contains a great collection of Review Articles and Tutorial Reviews which give an excellent overview of the last 20 years since the discovery of mesoporous materials, here is just a selection:

cover imageReviews

Hierarchical porous materials: catalytic applications
Christopher M. A. Parlett , Karen Wilson and Adam F. Lee
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35378D

Synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles
Si-Han Wu, Chung-Yuan Mou and Hong-Ping Lin
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS35405A

Tutorial Reviews

Mesoporosity – a new dimension for zeolites
Karin Möller and Thomas Bein
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS35488A

Anionic surfactant templated mesoporous silicas (AMSs)
Lu Han and Shunai Che
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35297D

Formation of mesostructured thin films at the air–liquid interface
Karen J. Edler and Bin Yang
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35300H

You can browse all the reviews from this themed issue online – Mesoporous Materials

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Power is nothing without control: Smart, polymeric, thermally-responsive nanoparticles

In this Review, which forms part of the upcoming Chem Soc Rev themed issue on Stimuli Responsive Materials, Rachel K. O’Reilly and Matthew I. Gibson, from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick, give an account of the factors involved in the design, characterisation and function of thermally responsive polymeric nanoparticles.

This review is concerned with a class of synthetic polymer, which have a lower critical solution temperature, the macroscopic result of which is a cloud point, accompanied by a structural change from coil to globule. A variety of LCST type thermoresponsive polymers are discussed in the review, including poly-N-vinylpiperidone, poly-oligoethyleneglycol-methacrylate, two substituted polyacrylamide polymers and also an elastin side chain polymer.

Phase transitions for polymers with lower and upper critical solution temperatures, common synthetic methodologies

Synthetic protocols described are self-assembly driven by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions and the grafting from or grafting to approaches, leading to a spherical, corona type assembly of thermally responsive polymer units, bound to a micellevesicle or inorganic nanoparticle such as silica, gold, iron oxide or polymeric colloid.

A large body of knowledge in the area of polymer brush functionalised flat surfaces is used as a comparison to the behaviour of the thermally responsive nanoparticles. Similar synthetic approaches are employed here too, which are well understood via complimentary analytical techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopyellipsometry,  and Quartz Crystal Microbalance analysis.

Emphasis is put on the importance of accurate determination of the cloud point. Examples are given of systems where significant differences in cloud point are observed, depending on whether the polymer is free in solution, or bound to a surface or nanoparticle. The use of Dynamic Light Scattering is shown to be a useful probe of aggregation or shrinkage properties, occurring upon heating. It is described how this adds to the understanding of the effect of various synthetic routes and polymerization methodologies on resultant properties.

Applications of such responsive materials are highlighted in the areas of enzyme function and solubility switching, and also in drug encapsulation and delivery.  The nanoparticle response may also be achieved by a secondary stimulus, such as a pH change, or salt environment, when temperature remains constant.

Overall, this is a highly interesting insight into a complex area with huge potential, which will prove to be an important reference point for researchers in this field.

Read this HOT Chem Soc Rev article today!

To aggregate, or not to aggregate? considerations in the design and application of polymeric thermally-responsive nanoparticles
Matthew I. Gibson and Rachel K. O’Reilly
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60035A

Kevin Murnaghan is a guest web-writer for Chem Soc Rev. He is currently a Research Chemist in the Adhesive Technologies Business Sector of Henkel AG & Co. KGaA, based in Düsseldorf, Germany. His research interests focus primarily on enabling chemistries and technologies for next generation adhesives and surface treatments. Any views expressed here are his personal ones and not those of Henkel AG & Co. KGaA.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Chemistry of functional nanomaterials themed issue

Chem Soc Rev is pleased to present an exciting themed issue on the Chemistry of functional nanomaterials.

This issue was Guest Edited by Yadong Yin (University of California, Riverside) and Dmitri Talapin (University of Chicago). Take a look at their editorial which introduces the issue:

The chemistry of functional nanomaterials
Yadong Yin and Dmitri Talapin
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2484-2487

The issues contains a collection of 21 Review Articles and Tutorials which showcase some of the prominent research into functional nanomaterials in recent years, here are just a few of those featured:

Tutorials
DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication
Guomei Zhang, Sumedh P. Surwade, Feng Zhou and Haitao Liu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2488-2496

Biomolecular specificity controlled nanomaterial synthesis
Chin-Yi Chiu, Lingyan Ruan and Yu Huang
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2512-2527

Bottom-up assembly of photonic crystals
Georg von Freymann, Vladimir Kitaev, Bettina V. Lotsch and Geoffrey A. Ozin
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2528-2554

Review Articles
Gold nanorods and their plasmonic properties
Huanjun Chen, Lei Shao, Qian Li and Jianfang Wang
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2679-2724

From the bottom up: dimensional control and characterization in molecular monolayers
Shelley A. Claridge, Wei-Ssu Liao, John C. Thomas, Yuxi Zhao, Huan H. Cao, Sarawut Cheunkar, Andrew C. Serino, Anne M. Andrews and Paul S. Weiss
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2725-2745

You can browse all the reviews from this themed issue online – Chemistry of functional nanomaterials

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Themed Issue: Solar Fuels

We are delighted to present the Chem Soc Rev themed issue on solar fuels. Guest Editors Siddharth Dasgupta, Bruce S. Brunschwig, Jay R. Winkler and Harry B. Gray introduce the issue in their Editorial:

Editorial: Solar fuels
Siddharth Dasgupta, Bruce S. Brunschwig, Jay R. Winkler and Harry B. Gray
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 2213-2214

The issue contains a collection of high-profile Reviews and Tutorial Reviews which introduce various key areas within solar fuels research. Here are just a selection:

Tutorial
Structure–function analyses of solar fuels catalysts using in situ X-ray scattering
Karen L. Mulfort, Anusree Mukherjee, Oleksandr Kokhan, Pingwu Du and David M. Tiede
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2215-2227

Tutorial
Comparison of primary oxidants for water-oxidation catalysis
Alexander R. Parent, Robert H. Crabtree and Gary W. Brudvig
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2247-2252

Review
Long-lived charge separated states in nanostructured semiconductor photoelectrodes for the production of solar fuels
Alexander J. Cowan and James R. Durrant
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2281-2293

Read the whole issue online

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)