Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Chem Soc Rev Impact factor soars high at 34.09

It is with great pleasure that we announce that Chem Soc Rev’s Impact factor has risen to 34.09 – its highest ever – according to the latest citation data released by Thomson Reuters in its 2015 Journal Citation Reports®.

With this, we maintain our position as the second top journal in multidisciplinary chemistry – thank you to all of our authors, referees, readers, Associate Editors, and Editorial and Advisory Board members for being an essential part of Chem Soc Rev’s continuing success.

We are proud to be the home of high impact, succinct and reader-friendly reviews from across the breadth of the chemical sciences, with a truly international authorship and a global audience.

And with our Immediacy index at an all-time high of 9.592 – higher than those of our key competitors, and an impressive 26% increase from last year – we are on track to make an even bigger impact in years to come.

Read our most highly cited reviews below. C6CS90001A

Tutorial reviews

Recent advances in semiconductors for photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting
Takashi Hisatomi, Jun Kubota and Kazunari Domen
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 7520-7535
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60378D, Tutorial Review
From themed collection Catalysis for Production of Renewable Energy

Recent progress in the development of near-infrared fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications
Zhiqian Guo, Sookil Park, Juyoung Yoon and Injae Shin
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 16-29
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60271K, Tutorial Review

How to produce white light in a single-phase host?
Mengmeng Shang, Chunxia Li and Jun Lin
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 1372-1386
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60314H, Tutorial Review

Review articles

Luminescent metal–organic frameworks for chemical sensing and explosive detection
Zhichao Hu, Benjamin J. Deibert and Jing Li
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 5815-5840
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00010B, Review Article
From themed collection Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs)

Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheet-based composites
Chaoliang Tan and Hua Zhang
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, 44, 2713-2731
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00182F, Review Article
From themed collection 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMD) Nanosheets

Earth-abundant cocatalysts for semiconductor-based photocatalytic water splitting
Jingrun Ran, Jun Zhang, Jiaguo Yu, Mietek Jaroniec and Shi Zhang Qiao
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 7787-7812
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60425J, Review Article
From themed collection Catalysis for Production of Renewable Energy

Applications of metal–organic frameworks in heterogeneous supramolecular catalysis
Jiewei Liu, Lianfen Chen, Hao Cui, Jianyong Zhang, Li Zhang and Cheng-Yong Su
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 6011-6061
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00094C, Review Article
From themed collection Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs)

Chem Soc Rev uses a formal online submission system for review proposals, incorporated into our existing online system. Please upload your completed proposal form online, and read our Author Guidelines for details.

Read more about the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journals 2015 impact factors

*The Impact factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year to articles published in the preceding two years, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. The journal Immediacy index indicates how quickly articles in a journal are cited, and is calculated by dividing the number of citations to articles published in a given year by the number of articles published in that year. Data based on 2015 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2016).

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ChemSocRev Symposium – 21 September 2015

We invite you to join us for a Chem. Soc. Rev. Symposium  at Lanzhou University on 21st September 2015.  The event is free to attend and there is no need to register in advance.

The symposium will feature lectures from Chem. Soc. Rev. Editorial and Advisory Board members from China and across the world, who are leading researchers in their respective fields. The topics covered will span a broad range of cutting edge chemistry and will appeal to anyone working in chemistry and its interfaces with other disciplines.

The programme is scheduled to begin from 8:30 am and the details are as follows:

08:30 Opening Remarks
Dr May Copsey and Professor Haoli Zhang
Session 1
08:45 Anion and amino-acid transport through lipid bilayers
Professor Philip Gale
University of Southampton, UK
09:20 New probes for use in polymer self-assembly and nanostructure labelling
Professor Rachel O’Reilly
University of Warwick, UK
09:55 Intracellular Mapping of Metals and Metallodrugs
Professor Zijian Guo
Nanjing University, China
10:30 Morning Tea
Session 2
10:50 Novel chemistry in the atmosphere probed using field measurements of the hydroxyl and other radicals
Professor Dwayne Heard
University of Leeds, UK
11:25 Effective Charge Carrier Utilization in Photocatalytic Conversions
Professor Jinlong Gong
Tianjin University, China
12:00 Lunch Break
Session 3
14:00 Collaborative Approach for C-H Functionalization
Professor Huw Davies
Emory University, USA
14:35 Asymmetric Direct Transformation of Aromatic Compounds
Professor Shuli You
Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, China
15:10 Bioorthogonal Elimination Reactions
Professor Peng Chen
Peking University, China
15.45 Afternoon tea
Session 4
16:05 Functional Materials Constructed by the Combination of Traditional Polymers and Host-Guest Molecular Recognition Motifs
Professor Feihe Huang
Zhejiang University, China
16:40 Assembling functional molecular units through non-covalent and covalent bonds off and on surfaces
Professor David Amabilino
University of Nottingham, UK
17:15 What could molecular assembly learn from chemical catalysis?
Professor Zhong-Qun Tian
Xiamen University, China
17:50 Closing Remarks
18:00 Close of meeting

Chem. Soc. Rev. Executive Editor, Dr May Copsey, the Chair of the Editorial Board Prof. Philip Gale and our local host, Professor Haoli Zhang warmly invite you to take part in this event and look forward to welcoming you to Lanzhou.

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Chem Soc Rev Impact Factor reaches a record 33.383!

We are delighted to announce that the latest Chemical Society Reviews Impact Factor has risen to 33.383 – its highest ever, and showing a fantastic 9.7% increase from last year – according to the 2014 Journal Citation Reports®.

C5CS90001HWe sincerely thank you – our authors, referees, Associate Editors, and Editorial and Advisory Board members – for all your valuable contributions and continued support which have brought the journal to where it is now. With a truly international authorship publishing accessible and reader-friendly articles, Chem Soc Rev remains as the home of high impact reviews from across the chemical sciences.

You can read our most highly cited review articles listed below.

Tutorial reviews

Metal dichalcogenide nanosheets: preparation, properties and applications
Xiao Huang, Zhiyuan Zeng and Hua Zhang
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 1934-1946
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35387C, Tutorial Review

Modifying enzyme activity and selectivity by immobilization
Rafael C. Rodrigues, Claudia Ortiz, Ángel Berenguer-Murcia, Rodrigo Torres and Roberto Fernández-Lafuente
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 6290-6307
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35231A, Tutorial Review
From themed collection Enzyme immobilisation

Review articles

Porphyrin-sensitized solar cells
Lu-Lin Li and Eric Wei-Guang Diau
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 291-304
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35257E, Review Article

Inorganic nanostructures for photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic water splitting
Frank E. Osterloh
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2294-2320
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35266D, Review Article

Nano-graphene in biomedicine: theranostic applications
Kai Yang, Liangzhu Feng, Xiaoze Shi and Zhuang Liu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 530-547
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35342C, Review Article

Enhancing solar cell efficiency: the search for luminescent materials as spectral converters
Xiaoyong Huang, Sanyang Han, Wei Huang and Xiaogang Liu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 173-201
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35288E, Review Article

Read more Impact Factor highlights for the Royal Society of Chemistry’s leading journals, including Chemical Science and Chemical Communications.

Find out how other RSC journals are ranked in the latest Impact Factor release

Chem Soc Rev uses a formal online submission system for review proposals, incorporated into our existing online system. Please upload your completed proposal form online, and read our Author Guidelines for details.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2014 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2015).

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Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2015 – nominations open

Chem Soc Rev is pleased to invite nominations for the 2015 Emerging Investigator Lectureship.  This annual lectureship is given to recognise an emerging scientist who has made a significant contribution to their research field.

Previous winners include:

photo of Peng Chen photo of Xile Hu photo of Xiaogang Liu
2014 – Peng Chen from the Peking University, Beijing, China
2013 – Xile Hu from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland
2012 – Xiaogang Liu from the National University of Singapore and Institute of Materials Research Engineering, A*STAR
2011 – Cristina Nevado from the University of Zurich in Switzerland
2010 – Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China, in Hefei
2009 – Matt Gaunt from the University of Cambridge in the UK
2008 – Kazuya Kikuchi from Osaka University in Japan

Qualifying details

To be eligible for the Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship, the candidate should have completed their PhD on or after 15th September 2006.

Lectureship details

The winner of the lectureship will be asked to present a lecture at an international meeting.  The Chem Soc Rev Editorial Office will provide the sum of £1000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.  The recipient will be presented with a certificate and will also be asked to contribute a review to the journal.

Nominations

Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee, including a brief CV together with a letter supporting the nomination, to the Chem Soc Rev Editorial Office by 15th December 2014.

Please note that self nomination is not permissible.

Following the close of nominations, nominees will be contacted and asked to summarise their key achievements and identify up to 5 of their top independent publications.  They will also be asked to highlight the impact of their work and discuss how their research has evolved from their previous supervisor’s.

Selection

The recipient of the lectureship will be selected and endorsed by the Chem Soc Rev Editorial Board.

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ChemSocRev Impact Factor rises to a record high – 30.4!

Thomson Reuters have just released their latest citation data and Chemical Society Reviews’ (Chem Soc Rev) Impact Factor has risen to a record high of 30.425! ChemSocRev - Issue 16

With a truly international authorship publishing accessible and reader-friendly articles, Chem Soc Rev really is the home of high impact reviews from across the chemical sciences. You can read our most highly cited review articles listed below.

Thank you to all who have contributed to the journal’s success so far – our authors, referees, readers and Editorial and Advisory Boards – we are very grateful for your support.

Find out how other Royal Society of Chemistry journals are ranked in the latest Impact Factor release

Top cited Chem Soc Rev reviews:

Reviews

Graphene-based composites
Xiao Huang, Xiaoying Qi, Freddy Boey and Hua Zhang

A review of electrode materials for electrochemical supercapacitors
Guoping Wang, Lei Zhang and Jiujun Zhang

Graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysts
Quanjun Xiang, Jiaguo Yu and Mietek Jaroniec

C–C, C–O and C–N bond formation via rhodium(III)-catalyzed oxidative C–H activation
Guoyong Song, Fen Wang and Xingwei Li  
From themed collection C-H Functionalization

Upconversion nanophosphors for small-animal imaging
Jing Zhou, Zhuang Liu and Fuyou Li

The golden age: gold nanoparticles for biomedicine
Erik C. Dreaden, Alaaldin M. Alkilany, Xiaohua Huang, Catherine J. Murphy and Mostafa A. El-Sayed  
From themed collection Nanomedicine

Fluorescent indicators based on BODIPY
Noël Boens, Volker Leen and Wim Dehaen

Mechanochemistry: opportunities for new and cleaner synthesis
Stuart L. James, Christopher J. Adams, Carsten Bolm, Dario Braga, Paul Collier, Tomislav Friščić, Fabrizia Grepioni, Kenneth D. M. Harris, Geoff Hyett, William Jones, Anke Krebs, James Mack, Lucia Maini, A. Guy Orpen, Ivan P. Parkin, William C. Shearouse, Jonathan W. Steed and Daniel C. Waddell

Tutorial Reviews

Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in biomedical applications
Zongxi Li, Jonathan C. Barnes, Aleksandr Bosoy, J. Fraser Stoddart and Jeffrey I. Zink  
From themed collection Nanomedicine

Organocatalytic umpolung: N-heterocyclic carbenes and beyond
Xavier Bugaut and Frank Glorius

Mesoporous metal–organic framework materials
Weimin Xuan, Chengfeng Zhu, Yan Liu and Yong Cui

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2014).

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175 Faces of Chemistry – Sason Shaik

Chemical Society Reviews contributor Sason Shaik, who recently published “A tutorial for understanding chemical reactivity through the valence bond approach”, features in our “175 Faces of Chemistry project”. He speaks about “these creatures called orbitals”, and the time when his project destroyed all of his spatulas.

Read Sason’s story.

In the countdown to our 175th Anniversary, we are celebrating the achievements of 175 inspirational scientists. Find out more and be inspired.

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MOF2014: Poster abstract deadline 30 June

MOF2014
28 September – 1 October 2014, Kobe, Japan

Deadline of poster abstract submission: 30 June

Our forthcoming Chem Soc Rev themed issue on Metal Organic Frameworks will be promoted at the forthcoming MOF2014 Conference, with all delegates receiving a free USB flash drive with a copy of the whole MOFs themed issue. The guest editors are Susumu Kitagawa (Kyoto University), Chair of MOF2014, and (Joe Zhou, Texas A&M University).

Keynote Speakers:
Xiao-Ming Chen, Sun-Yat-Sen University/PRC
Andrew Cooper, University of Liverpool/UK
Roland Fischer, Ruhr-University Bochum/Ger
Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley/USA
George Shimizu, University of Calgary/Can
Myunghyun Paik Suh, Seoul National University/RoK
Qiang Xu, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)/Jpn
Omar Yaghi, University of California, Berkeley/USA

Submit your poster abstract for MOF2014

Preview Chem Soc Rev themed issue on Metal Organic Frameworks

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Peng Chen wins Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2014

On behalf of the Chem Soc Rev Editorial Board, we are delighted to announce that Professor Peng Chen from the Peking University, Beijing, China, has been chosen as the winner of the 2014 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship.

As a chemical biologist, Peng’s research aims to address fundamental questions in human health, specifically the threat of infectious diseases. Since 2009 his laboratory has focused on developing and applying novel chemistry tools to investigate protein based interactions and activities in living cells, with a focus on host-pathogen interactions.

The group’s current research projects include ‘Photo-affinity probes for studying protein-protein interactions in living cells’, ‘Visualization of organic hydroperoxides in living cells’ and ‘Protein Bioorthogonal labeling in living cells’.

Peng expressed his delight upon learning of the award, saying, “It’s a tremendous pleasure to receive this prestigious award. Being recognized by the international community means a lot to me at this early stage of my career.”  He is keen to share the credit, adding, “This honour should also go to my students and co-workers, and I am deeply grateful to the Editorial Board and staff of Chem Soc Rev.

The Emerging Investigator Lectureship is awarded each year to an emerging scientist who has made a significant contribution to their research field. Previous winners of the award include Xile Hu (2013), Xiaogang Liu (2012) and Cristina Nevado (2011). Nominations for the Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2015 will open later in the year – keep an eye on this blog.

Peng will present his Emerging Investigator lecture and receive his award at an international event sometime in the next twelve months. Further details will be announced in due course.

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Progress in Allene Chemistry – Themed Issue

During the last three decades the chemistry of allenes has fascinated scientists world-wide. Guest editors, Benito Alcaide and Pedro Almendros, have gathered together a collection of papers highlighting the importance of allene chemistry. There is a diverse range of around 150 natural products containing an allenic or cumulenic structure; many of them showing interesting and promising therapeutic activities.

From tutorial reviews demonstrating the use of allenes as building blocks, the cycloadditions of allenes and an insight into the gold chemistry of allenes to review articles on the cyclization, synthesis and conversion of allenes, this collection acts as a reference for scientists in the area. The combination of these tutorial reviews and review articles illustrate the versatility of the cumulated diene system of allenes. This themed issue provides a multidisciplinary view of the chameleonic allene moiety – from synthesis, structure, and reactivity to properties of allenes. Click here to access the full collection of paper.

To view the full editorial for free* click the link below.

Progress in allene chemistry

Benito Alcaide and  Pedro Almendros
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS90020K

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Nucleation & Crystallography Themed Issue

This year is the international year of crystallography so guest editors David Amabilino and Xavier Obradors from the Institute of Material Science of Barcelona, introduce the ‘Nucleation and Crystallisation’ themed issue of Chemical Society Reviews.

It is over a hundred years since the thermodynamic principles of nucleation were established. The formation of crystals can be spectacular, but the mechanisms of their nucleation and growth are not fully understood. Control over crystallisation can be achieved, but there are still a number of outstanding fundamental questions that remain unanswered.

With different backgrounds, yet a common passion for nucleation and crystallisation, our guest editors put together a collection of view-points of crystallisation from across different areas of chemistry. From crystal crops in Mexico to pulsed lasers and crystallisation techniques involving light, this stimulating collection fuses together the great advances made over the years in the different disciplines of chemistry.


The Nucleation and Crystallisation themed issue is now available online. To access the full editorial for free, click the link below:
Nucleation & crystallisation
David B. Amabilino and Xavier Obradors
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS90015D

If this fascinating area of chemistry inspires you, why not attend the upcoming discussion in Leeds?
Nucleation – A Transition State to the Directed Assembly of Materials

Faraday Discussion
30 March – 1 April 2015, Leeds MET, UK
http://rsc.li/nucleation-fd2015

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