Archive for the ‘Hot Articles’ Category

CRISPR-Cas9 and the evolution of targeted genomic engineering

Advances in the development of genomic engineering have unprecedented potential to make significant impacts on the future of health and research. Since their development, genetic editing tools have become a major hot topic not only within the scientific community but also with the general public. Precise and facile methods of modifying gene sequences provide us with the ability to understand and even cure some of our deadliest genetic diseases however, this has also raised ethical questions as to what can (and perhaps should) be achieved.

In their most basic form, genome editing technologies are proteins that can cleave DNA in a site specific manner and cause alterations such as inactivation of specific genes, correction of mutated sequences or insertion of intact genes into a target DNA sequence. This cumulates into a downstream phenotypic change within the cell that not only allows biologists to study normal gene function but also carries tremendous therapeutic relevance.

A recent Tutorial Review by Debojyoti Chakraborty and Souvik Maiti published in Chemical Society Reviews describes the development, evolution and future of genetic editing technologies and molecular tools such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), site specific recombinases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). Of those listed, the CRISPR-Cas9 system is by far the most precise, efficient, inexpensive and easy-to-use tool for genetic manipulation and has been proven to work on virtually any living cell in almost any organism. In the short amount of time since its development, CRISPR-Cas9 has reinvented the way in which scientists are carrying out genetic research and approaching gene therapy.

CRISPR-Cas9 is distinct from conventional gene therapies which are often only capable of crudely placing genetic material at a random location within the cell. The idea behind CRISPR-Cas9’s mechanism and its precision is derived from innate bacterial immune systems which use arrays of short repeats in the microbial genome, termed CRISPR, to protect themselves from foreign genetic material. The CRISPR-Cas9 system is made up of the Cas9 protein that snips the DNA strands and an RNA component that directs the complex to the correct sequence. The cell’s natural machinery then repairs the cut but it is error-prone and will likely make a mistake that will result in termination of that gene’s function. This allows scientists to determine the gene’s role in cellular function. An interesting example of this was recently published in Chemical Science by Peter Leadlay of Cambridge University and Yuhui Sun of Wuhan University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and describes the application of this genomics-based approach in determining the biosynthetic pathway of thiotetronate antibiotics. Alternatively, the cut can be repaired using a DNA template provided by the researchers to edit nearly any sequence at any site in the genome.

The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been demonstrated in numerous studies to be a highly efficient tool for gene-editing and has resulted in significant advancements within the field of genomics. There are however, as with any new technology, limitations and gaps in our understanding that need to be addressed before clinical applications can be considered. Unsurprisingly, a lot of research is being focused on tackling these issues. The potential to rewrite the human genome to alter disease states, perhaps enhance our ability to fight infectious diseases and even alter pathways involved in aging is incredible but will inevitably come with a spectrum of ethical, social and intellectual challenges. In any case, these are exciting times and these inventions stand to change the future of medicine.

To find out more see:

CRISPR/Cas9: a historical and chemical biology perspective of targeted genome engineering
Amrita Singh, Debojyoti Chakraborty and Souvik Maiti
DOI: 10.1039/C6CS00197A

A genomics-led approach to deciphering the mechanism of thiotetronate antibiotic biosynthesis
W. Tao, M. E. Yurkovich, S. Wen, K. E. Lebe, M. Samborskyy, Y. Liu, A. Yang, Y. Liu, Y. Ju, Z. Deng, M. Tosin, Y. Sun and P. F. Leadley
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03059E


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.
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Hot Chem Soc Rev articles for March

Here are some of the latest referee-recommended articles published in Chem Soc Rev – all free to read until 17 April!

Metal-containing and related polymers for biomedical applications
Yi Yan, Jiuyang Zhang, Lixia Ren and Chuanbing Tang
DOI: 10.1039/C6CS00026F, Review Article

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New perspectives in organolanthanide chemistry from redox to bond metathesis: insights from theory
Christos E. Kefalidis, Ludovic Castro, Lionel Perrin, Iker Del Rosal and Laurent Maron
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00907C, Review Article

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Man-made molecular machines: membrane bound
Matthew A. Watson and Scott L. Cockroft
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00874C, Tutorial Review

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Filling the gap between the quantum and classical worlds of nanoscale magnetism: giant molecular aggregates based on paramagnetic 3d metal ions
Constantina Papatriantafyllopoulou, Eleni E. Moushi, George Christou and Anastasios J. Tasiopoulos
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00590F, Review Article

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*Access is free through a registered RSC account

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Hot Chem Soc Rev articles for December

Take a look at this selection of recently published referee-recommended articles – all are free to read* until 23 January.

Hierarchy concepts: classification and preparation strategies for zeolite containing materials with hierarchical porosity
Wilhelm Schwieger, Albert Gonche Machoke, Tobias Weissenberger, Amer Inayat, Thangaraj Selvam, Michael Klumpp and Alexandra Inayat
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00599J, Review Article

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Reactive p-block cations stabilized by weakly coordinating anions
Tobias A. Engesser, Martin R. Lichtenthaler, Mario Schleep and Ingo Krossing
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00672D, Review Article
From themed collection Modern Main Group Chemistry

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Reactivity in the periphery of functionalised multiple bonds of heavier group 14 elements
Carsten Präsang and David Scheschkewitz
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00720H, Review Article
From themed collection Modern Main Group Chemistry

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Natural supramolecular protein assemblies
Bas J. G. E. Pieters, Mark B. van Eldijk, Roeland J. M. Nolte and Jasmin Mecinović
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00157A, Tutorial Review

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*Access is free through a registered RSC account

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Hot Chem Soc Rev articles for October

Take a look at this selection of recently published referee-recommended articles – all are free to read* until 23 November.

A colloidoscope of colloid-based porous materials and their uses
Katherine R. Phillips, Grant T. England, Steffi Sunny, Elijah Shirman, Tanya Shirman, Nicolas Vogel and Joanna Aizenberg
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00533G, Review Article

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Semimetal-functionalised polyoxovanadates
Kirill Yu. Monakhov, Wolfgang Bensch and Paul Kögerler
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00531K, Review Article

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Synthesis, characterisation, and catalytic evaluation of hierarchical faujasite zeolites: milestones, challenges, and future directions
D. Verboekend, N. Nuttens, R. Locus, J. Van Aelst, P. Verolme, J. C. Groen, J. Pérez-Ramírez and B. F. Sels
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00520E, Review Article

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Fluorescence based explosive detection: from mechanisms to sensory materials
Xiangcheng Sun, Ying Wang and Yu Lei
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00496A, Review Article

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*Access is free through a registered RSC account

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Hot Chem Soc Rev articles for September

Here are some recent referee-recommeded ChemSoc Rev reviews for you to enjoy – all free to read* until the end of September:

New faces of porous Prussian blue: interfacial assembly of integrated hetero-structures for sensing applications
Biao Kong, Cordelia Selomulya, Gengfeng Zheng and Dongyuan Zhao 
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00397K, Review Article

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Supramolecular polymer adhesives: advanced materials inspired by nature
Christian Heinzmann, Christoph Weder and Lucas Montero de Espinosa 
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00477B, Review Article

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Quantum state resolved gas–surface reaction dynamics experiments: a tutorial review
Helen Chadwick and Rainer D. Beck 
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00476D, Tutorial Review
From themed collection Surface Reaction Dynamics

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Functionalization of phosphorescent emitters and their host materials by main-group elements for phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices
Xiaolong Yang, Guijiang Zhou and Wai-Yeung Wong
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00424A, Review Article

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*Access is free through a registered RSC account

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The complete cookbook: multi-shelled hollow micro-/nanostructures

Hollow micro-/nanostructures have a wide range of potential applications, including catalysis, drug delivery, sensors and fuel cells. This is thanks to their unique array of properties such as high specific surface area, low density and high loading capacity.   

As any child will tell you, two sweets are better than one, while three or four are better still, and the same holds true for the number of shells in a multi-shelled hollow micro-/nanostructure. These multi-shelled structures should have significantly prolonged release times for drug delivery and improved performance in heterogeneous catalysis, lithium ion batteries and photocatalysis applications. However, with increased complexity come increased synthetic challenges.  

In their recent review, titled, ‘Multi-shelled hollow micro-/nanostructures, Dan Wang et. al. describe the myriad of synthetic approaches for multi-shelled hollow micro-/nanostructures, before focusing on their compositional and geometric manipulation, as well as the range of potential applications. Finally, the authors look at the future challenges in the area, which include: expanding the components that can be used to make multi-shells, multi-shells whose individual shells are different, and control of inter-shell spacing.  

Preparation of a multi-shelled microstructure

Although other recent review articles have discussed hollow micro-/nanostructured materials, this is the first to focus exclusively on multi-shelled hollow structures.  

If you are interested in working on any of these challenges or others that the authors highlight, this review is a perfect starting place to get up to speed.  

To read the details, check out the Chem Soc Rev article in full:
Multi-shelled hollow micro-/nanostructures
Jian Qi, Xiaoyong Lai, Jiangyan Wang, Hongjie Tang, Hao Ren, Yu Yang, Quan Jin, Lijuan Zhang, Ranbo Yu, Guanghui Ma, Zhiguo Su, Huijun Zhao and Dan Wang
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, 44, DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00344J  

 
 

 

  

   

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Hot Chem Soc Rev articles for July

Here are a few of the most recent referee-recommended articles in Chem Soc Rev – all free to read until 13th August:

Multi-shelled hollow micro-/nanostructures
Jian Qi, Xiaoyong Lai, Jiangyan Wang, Hongjie Tang, Hao Ren, Yu Yang, Quan Jin, Lijuan Zhang, Ranbo Yu, Guanghui Ma, Zhiguo Su, Huijun Zhao and Dan Wang
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00344J, Review Article

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Metal complexes of curcumin – synthetic strategies, structures and medicinal applications
Simon Wanninger, Volker Lorenz, Abdus Subhan and Frank T. Edelmann
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00088B, Tutorial Review
Open Access

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Multifunctional metal–organic frameworks: from academia to industrial applications
Patrícia Silva, Sérgio M. F. Vilela, João P. C. Tomé and Filipe A. Almeida Paz
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00307E, Review Article

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Improving f-element single molecule magnets
Stephen T. Liddle and Joris van Slageren
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00222B, Tutorial Review

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Hot Chem Soc Rev articles for April

We’ve listed some recent referee-recommended articles from Chem Soc Rev below for you to read. All are free to access until 21st May.

Photoluminescence imaging of Zn2+ in living systems
Yuncong Chen, Yang Bai, Zhong Han, Weijiang He and Zijian Guo 
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00005J, Review Article
From themed collection Imaging Agents

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Organic field-effect transistor-based gas sensors
Congcong Zhang, Penglei Chen and Wenping Hu 
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015,44, 2087-2107
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00326H, Tutorial Review

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Nano- and micro-sized rare-earth carbonates and their use as precursors and sacrificial templates for the synthesis of new innovative materials
Anna M. Kaczmarek, Kristof Van Hecke and Rik Van Deun 
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015,44, 2032-2059
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00433G, Review Article

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Chemistry at the interior atoms of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Lawrence T. Scott 
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00479E, Review Article
From themed collection Challenges in Aromaticity: 150 Years after Kekulé’s Benzene

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Highly cited from Chem Soc Rev

ChemSocRev journal cover imageThere is something for everyone to enjoy amongst our this selection  of highly cited reviews published in ChemSocRev in 2013, each with more than 100 citations to date.*

From nanomaterials and photocatalysis to drug delivery and theory, the list reflects the diverse subject areas covered by ChemSocRev.

We hope you enjoy reading this selection if you haven’t already. Sign up to receive our table of contents e-alerts to make sure you don’t miss our latest content.

Most cited papers from 2013 to date*:

Metal dichalcogenide nanosheets: preparation, properties and applications
Xiao Huang, Zhiyuan Zeng and Hua Zhang
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 1934-1946
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35387C, Tutorial Review

Porphyrin-sensitized solar cells
Lu-Lin Li and Eric Wei-Guang Diau
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 291-304
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35257E, Review Article

Nano-graphene in biomedicine: theranostic applications
Kai Yang, Liangzhu Feng, Xiaoze Shi and Zhuang Liu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 530-547
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35342C, Review Article

Inorganic nanostructures for photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic water splitting
Frank E. Osterloh
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2294-2320
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35266D, Review Article
From themed collection Solar fuels

Enhancing solar cell efficiency: the search for luminescent materials as spectral converters
Xiaoyong Huang, Sanyang Han, Wei Huang and Xiaogang Liu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 173-201
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35288E, Review Article

Organic sensitizers from D–π–A to D–A–π–A: effect of the internal electron-withdrawing units on molecular absorption, energy levels and photovoltaic performances
Yongzhen Wu and Weihong Zhu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2039-2058
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35346F, Review Article

Far-red to near infrared analyte-responsive fluorescent probes based on organic fluorophore platforms for fluorescence imaging
Lin Yuan, Weiying Lin, Kaibo Zheng, Longwei He and Weimin Huang
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 622-661
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35313J, Review Article

Gold nanorods and their plasmonic properties
Huanjun Chen, Lei Shao, Qian Li and Jianfang Wang
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 2679-2724
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35367A, Review Article
From themed collection Chemistry of functional nanomaterials

Modifying enzyme activity and selectivity by immobilization
Rafael C. Rodrigues, Claudia Ortiz, Ángel Berenguer-Murcia, Rodrigo Torres and Roberto Fernández-Lafuente
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 6290-6307
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35231A, Tutorial Review
From themed collection Enzyme immobilisation


Arylamine organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells
Mao Liang and Jun Chen
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 3453-3488
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS35372A, Review Article

Click here for even more highly cited reviews

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Hot Chem Soc Rev articles for February

We invite you to take a look at some of the most recent referee-recommended articles published in Chem Soc Rev – all free to download until 23rd March!

Synthetic biology for the directed evolution of protein biocatalysts: navigating sequence space intelligently
Andrew Currin, Neil Swainston, Philip J. Day and Douglas B. Kell  
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00351A, Review Article

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Electronic structures and theoretical modelling of two-dimensional group-VIB transition metal dichalcogenides
Gui-Bin Liu, Di Xiao, Yugui Yao, Xiaodong Xu and Wang Yao
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00301B, Review Article
From themed collection 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMD) Nanosheets

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Molecules with a sense of logic: a progress report
Joakim Andréasson and Uwe Pischel  
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00342J, Tutorial Review

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Recent advancements in Pt and Pt-free catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction
Yao Nie, Li Li and Zidong Wei  
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00484A, Review Article

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