HOT Chem Soc Rev articles for November

The referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 5th January 2018.

Crossed beam polyatomic reaction dynamics: recent advances and new insights
Huilin Pan, Kopin Liu, Adriana Caracciolo and Piergiorgio Casavecchia
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00601B, Review Article

This article is part of the themed collection: Chemical reaction dynamics

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Variational transition state theory: theoretical framework and recent developments
Junwei Lucas Bao and Donald G. Truhlar
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00602K, Review Article

This article is part of the themed collection: Chemical reaction dynamics

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Advances in the synthesis of nitroxide radicals for use in biomolecule spin labelling
Marius M. Haugland, Janet E. Lovett and Edward A. Anderson
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6CS00550K, Tutorial Review

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Chem Soc Rev Pioneering Investigator Lectureship 2018 – nominations now open!

Know an outstanding mid-career scientist who deserves recognition? Nominate now for the 2018 Chem Soc Rev Pioneering Investigator Lectureship

We are pleased to welcome nominations for the 2018 Pioneering Investigator Lectureship for Chem Soc Rev.

All nominations must be received by Monday, 19 February 2018.

The Pioneering Investigator Lectureship replaces our previous Emerging Investigator Lectureship, and aims to recognise mid-career scientists who have firmly established themselves in their independent careers. Early career researchers can be nominated for the ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship.

Chem Soc Rev Pioneering Investigator Lectureship

• Recognises mid-career scientists who have firmly established themselves in their independent careers, continuously publish innovative work, and have pioneered several research areas.

• Eligible nominees should have completed their PhD between 15th September 2002 and 14th September 2009.

Lectureship details

• The recipient of the lectureship will be invited to present a lecture at three different locations over a 12-month period, with at least one of these events taking place at an international conference.

• The recipient will receive a contribution of £1500 towards travel and accommodation costs for their lectures, as well as a certificate.

• The recipient will be asked to contribute a review article for the journal.

How to nominate

Self-nomination is not permitted. Nominators must send the following to the editorial team via chemsocrev-rsc@rsc.org by Monday, 19 February 2018.

• Recommendation letter, including the name, contact details and website URL of the nominee.

• A one-page CV for the nominee, including a summary of their education, dates of key career achievements, a list of up to five of their top independent publications, total numbers of publications and patents, and other indicators of esteem, together with evidence of career independence.

• A copy of the candidate’s best publication to date (as judged by the nominator).

• Two supporting letters of recommendation from two independent referees. These should not be someone from the same institution or the candidate’s post doc or PhD supervisor.

The nominator and independent referees should comment on the candidate’s presenting skills.

Incomplete nominations or those not adhering to the above requirements will not be considered, and nominees will not be contacted regarding any missing or incorrect documents.

Selection procedure

• The editorial team will screen each nomination for eligibility and draw up a shortlist of candidates based on the nomination documents provided.

• Shortlisted candidates will be asked to provide a brief supporting statement summarising their key achievements, highlighting the impact of their work and justifying why they deserve the specific lectureship for which they have been entered.

• The recipient of the lectureship will then be selected and endorsed by a selection panel composed of members of the ChemSocRev Editorial Board. The winner will be announced in the first half of 2018.

NB: Please note that members of the selection panel from the Chem Soc Rev Editorial Board are not eligible to nominate, or provide references, for this lectureship.

For any queries, please contact the editorial team at chemsocrev-rsc@rsc.org.

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HOT Chem Soc Rev articles for October

The referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 13th December 2017.

Two-dimensional boron: structures, properties and applications
Zhuhua Zhang, Evgeni S. Penev and Boris I. Yakobson
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017,46, 6746-6763
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00261K, Review Article

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Exploring the emergence of complexity using synthetic replicators
Tamara Kosikova and Douglas Philp
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00123A, Review Article

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CSR Primer

The Chemical Society Reviews Editorial Board is proud to announce a collection of Tutorial Reviews on some of the most cutting-edge, exciting research in the chemical sciences. This is an excellent resource or ‘primer’ for students, to help them learn more about various topics of investigation and to provide additional guidance in the next steps of their career.

This fall, students around the world will begin their graduate studies looking for that perfect match for their doctoral studies. Students often find the process of identifying a research topic and an advisor a stressful and uncertain process. Understandably, many students are only versed in the fundamentals of chemistry from their undergraduate coursework, with a limited knowledge of what constitutes the state-of-the-art in chemical research.  With this in mind, the Chemical Society Reviews Editorial Board thought it would be timely to provide a collection of Tutorial Reviews on some of the most cutting-edge, exciting research in the chemical sciences.  The Board sees this as a resource or ‘primer’ for students, to help them learn more about various topics of investigation and to perhaps aid them in their decision making process.  To all the new graduate students, the Editorial Board and staff of Chemical Society Reviews would like to extend our congratulations to you on the next stage of your education and we hope this collection might provide some additional help in informing you about what might be the best path for your research interests.

Please click here to view our Primer.

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HOT Chem Soc Rev articles for August

The referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 6th October 2017.

Spatiotemporal hydrogel biomaterials for regenerative medicine
Tobin E. Brown and Kristi S. Anseth
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
10.1039/C7CS00445A, Review Article

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Controlled droplet microfluidic systems for multistep chemical and biological assays
T. S. Kaminski and P. Garstecki
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
10.1039/C5CS00717H, Tutorial Review

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HOT Chem Soc Rev articles for July

The referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 10th September 2017.

Asymmetric Brønsted Acid Catalysis with Chiral Carboxylic Acids
Chang Min and Daniel Seidel
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6CS00239K, Review Article

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Defense contracts: molecular protection in insect-microbe symbioses
Ethan B. Van Arnam, Cameron R. Currie and Jon Clardy
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00340D, Review Article

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Louise Berben joins Chem Soc Rev as Associate Editor

We warmly welcome Professor Louise Berben (University of California Davis) as a new Associate Editor for Chem Soc Rev

Prof. Berben

Louise Berben is Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of California Davis where her research program focuses primarily on synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry. Her honours and awards include the Chemical Communications Emerging Investigator Lectureship (2013), Organometallics Young Investigator Fellowship (2014), Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2014), and Kavli Fellow (2015).

Her research program spans synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry with a primary emphasis on synthesis of new transition metal and main group molecules with unusual electronic structures, which support electron and proton transfer reactions, and the generation and reaction of hydride with small molecules such as CO2 and N2. Recent work includes electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to formate in neutral water, including thermochemical and kinetic investigations that explain the selectivity of the C-H bond formation event.

Read Professor Berben’s recent articles published in Chem Soc Rev‘s sister journals:
A pendant proton shuttle on [Fe4N(CO)12] alters product selectivity in formate vs. H2 production via the hydride [H–Fe4N(CO)12]
Natalia D. Loewen, Emily J. Thompson, Michael Kagan, Carolina L. Banales, Thomas W. Myers, James C. Fettinger and Louise A. Berben
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 2728-2735

Making C–H bonds with CO2: production of formate by molecular electrocatalysts
Atefeh Taheri and Louise A. Berben
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 1768-1777

Synthesis and characterization of bis(imino)pyridine complexes of divalent Mg and Zn
Thomas W. Myers, Tobias J. Sherbow, James C. Fettinger and Louise A. Berben
Dalton Trans., 2016, 45, 5989-5998

If you are interested in writing a review for Chem Soc Rev, please download a proposal form from our website and submit the completed synopsis via our online submission system.

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HOT Chem Soc Rev articles for June

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 5th August 2017.

Extreme ultraviolet resist materials for sub-7 nm patterning
Li Li, Xuan Liu, Shyam Pal, Shulan Wang, Christopher K. Ober and Emmanuel P. Giannelis
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00080D, Tutorial Review

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Theory of 2D crystals: graphene and beyond
Rafael Roldán, Luca Chirolli, Elsa Prada, Jose Angel Silva-Guillén, Pablo San-Jose and Francisco Guinea
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00210F, Tutorial Review

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Mastering high resolution tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: towards a shift of perception
Marie Richard-Lacroix, Yao Zhang, Zhenchao Dong and Volker Deckert
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017,46, 3922-3944
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00203C, Review Article
From themed collection Surface and tip enhanced spectroscopies

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Complexes of Ni(I): a “rare” oxidation state of growing importance
Chun-Yi Lin and Philip P. Power
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00216E, Review Article

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Rafal Klajn: Winner of the Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2017

On behalf of the Chem Soc Rev Editorial Board, we are pleased to announce the winner of the 2017 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship – Rafal Klajn from the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. Our warmest congratulations to Rafal!

Rafal was born in Poland, where he completed his undergraduate studies. He was awarded his PhD in Chemical and Biological Engineering in 2009 at Northwestern University, where he worked with Professors Bartosz A Grzybowski and Sir J Fraser Stoddart on fabricating new hybrid materials incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and molecular switches. For his doctoral research, he was awarded the 2008 International Precious Metals Institute Student Award, the 2010 IUPAC Prize for Young Chemists, and the 2013 Victor K. LaMer Award from the American Chemical Society.

Rafal Klajn

He began his independent research career in November 2009 at the Department of Organic Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, as a tenure-track Assistant Professor directly after obtaining his PhD degree. Since then, his group has worked on nanoscale reactivity and self-assembly – incorporating photo-responsive moieties into nanoporous solids, working with superparamagnetic nanoparticles of various shapes and demonstrating that cubic nanoparticles of iron oxide could spontaneously assemble into helical materials, and developing the concept of “dynamically self-assembling nanoflasks” capable of accelerating chemical reactions using light, working with flexible metal-organic (coordination) cages that can encapsulate diverse organic molecules ranging from fluorescent dyes to nonpolar pharmaceuticals, among other projects.

He is currently an Associate Professor at the Weizmann Institute of Science and now focuses on creating synthetic out-of-equilibrium systems and “life-like” materials, not only to develop innovative functional materials, but also to tackle what he deems as one of the most important and fascinating problems – the origin of life.

As part of the Lectureship, Rafal will present a lecture at three locations over the coming year, with at least one of these events taking place at an international conference, where he will be formally presented with his Emerging Investigator Lectureship certificate. Details of his lectures will be announced in due course – keep an eye on the blog for details.

Read these Open Access articles by Rafal Klajn:

Spiropyran-based dynamic materials
Rafal Klajn
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 148-184
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60181A, Review Article,  Open Access

Dual-responsive nanoparticles that aggregate under the simultaneous action of light and CO2
Ji-Woong Lee and Rafal Klajn
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 2036-2039
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08541H, Communication,  Open Access

Magnetic field-induced self-assembly of iron oxide nanocubes
Gurvinder Singh, Henry Chan, T. Udayabhaskararao, Elijah Gelman, Davide Peddis, Artem Baskin, Gregory Leitus, Petr Král and Rafal Klajn
Faraday Discuss., 2015, 181, 403-421
DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00265B, Paper,  Open Access
From themed collection Nanoparticle Synthesis and Assembly

Controlling the lifetimes of dynamic nanoparticle aggregates by spiropyran functionalization
Pintu K. Kundu, Sanjib Das, Johannes Ahrens and Rafal Klajn
Nanoscale, 2016,8, 19280-19286
DOI: 10.1039/C6NR05959G, Paper,  Open Access

The Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship is an annual lectureship which recognises emerging scientists who have made a significant contribution to their research field.  Nominations for the 2018 Lectureship will open later in the year – keep an eye on the blog for details, and read more about our previous winners.

2016:     Gonçalo Bernardes from the University of Cambridge, UK

      Guihua Yu from the University of Texas at Austin, USA

2015:     Aron Walsh from the University of Bath, UK

2014:     Peng Chen from Peking University, Beijing, China

2013:     Xile Hu from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland

2012:     Xiaogang Liu from the National University of Singapore and Institute of Materials Research Engineering, A*STAR, Singapore

2011:     Cristina Nevado from the University of Zurich, Switzerland

2010:     Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China

2009:     Matt Gaunt from the University of Cambridge, UK

2008:     Kazuya Kikuchi from Osaka University, Japan

Read our excellent 2016 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigators themed issue and watch out for our upcoming Emerging Investigators issue next year.

 

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Optoacoustics for high resolution in vivo imaging

Optoacoustic imaging is an emerging new technology that is gaining momentum within the biomedical research community due to its enhanced capability to provide high-resolution in vivo imaging.

Fundamentally, it is a three-dimensional technique that combines features from optics and acoustics. First, tissue is illuminated using short-pulsed light radiation and then undergoes thermo-elastic expansion. This sudden and rapid expansion gives rise to pressure waves with ultrasonic frequency which are detected and analyzed to produce images for study or diagnosis.

Interestingly, the photoacoustic effect has been around since the 1800s however, the surge of interest in this technology has been dependent on the development of adequate laser sources, sensitive ultrasound detection and processing technologies in recent years.

A recent review by Dr. Xosé Luis Deán and Dr. Sven Gottschalk of the Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging in Neurhberg, Germany, Prof. Shy Shoham of the Israel Institute of Technology, and Dr. Ben Mc Larney and Prof. Daniel Razansky of the Technical University of Munich describes the development and new advancements in multiscale imaging of in vivo dynamics using optoacoustic methods.

Purely optical imaging techniques such as optical coherent tomography (OCT), fluorescent imaging and optical microscopies are broadly used for in vivo imaging and have led to numerous advances within medicine as function, disease progression and diagnosis at the cellular and biological scales can be analyzed in real-time. However, the limitation of purely optical techniques lies in resolving deep tissue processes. Beyond millimeter depth, photons are strongly scattered in biological tissues which limits spatial resolution and quantification. 

Optoacoustic imaging on the other hand, combines the best of two worlds by capitalizing on the advantages of both optics and ultrasound which enables multiscale, non-invasive imaging deep within the tissue. Many optoacoustic imaging systems also allow wavelength tenability, which allows a single device to serve multiple purposes.

The review outlines some ground-breaking applications that have come about as a result of advancements in optoacoustic images and sensing methods. These include large-scale neuroimaging, visualization of moving organs, contrast agent kinetics, pharmacokinetic and bio-distribution analysis, treatment monitoring, molecular imaging, cellular and sub-cellular function elucidation and three-dimensional handheld diagnostics of human subjects.

The development of advanced optoacoustic imaging techniques is adding to the toolset of biological imaging by filling gaps in established methods. Since it uses nonionizing visible/near infrared light, it is safe for patients and ideal for frequent-use in routine and preventative examinations. The promise shown in preclinical and early clinical studies as well as the surge of technological advancements provides a solid platform for the application of optoacoustic imaging in mainstream medicine.

To find out more see:

Advanced optoacoustic methods for multiscale imaging of in vivo dynamics
X.L. Deán-Ben, S. Gottschalk, B. Mc Larney, S. Shoham and D. Razansky
DOI: 10.1039/C6CS00765A


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.
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