Rafal Klajn: Winner of the Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2017

On behalf of the Chem Soc Rev Editorial Board, we are pleased to announce the winner of the 2017 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship – Rafal Klajn from the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. Our warmest congratulations to Rafal!

Rafal was born in Poland, where he completed his undergraduate studies. He was awarded his PhD in Chemical and Biological Engineering in 2009 at Northwestern University, where he worked with Professors Bartosz A Grzybowski and Sir J Fraser Stoddart on fabricating new hybrid materials incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and molecular switches. For his doctoral research, he was awarded the 2008 International Precious Metals Institute Student Award, the 2010 IUPAC Prize for Young Chemists, and the 2013 Victor K. LaMer Award from the American Chemical Society.

Rafal Klajn

He began his independent research career in November 2009 at the Department of Organic Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, as a tenure-track Assistant Professor directly after obtaining his PhD degree. Since then, his group has worked on nanoscale reactivity and self-assembly – incorporating photo-responsive moieties into nanoporous solids, working with superparamagnetic nanoparticles of various shapes and demonstrating that cubic nanoparticles of iron oxide could spontaneously assemble into helical materials, and developing the concept of “dynamically self-assembling nanoflasks” capable of accelerating chemical reactions using light, working with flexible metal-organic (coordination) cages that can encapsulate diverse organic molecules ranging from fluorescent dyes to nonpolar pharmaceuticals, among other projects.

He is currently an Associate Professor at the Weizmann Institute of Science and now focuses on creating synthetic out-of-equilibrium systems and “life-like” materials, not only to develop innovative functional materials, but also to tackle what he deems as one of the most important and fascinating problems – the origin of life.

As part of the Lectureship, Rafal will present a lecture at three locations over the coming year, with at least one of these events taking place at an international conference, where he will be formally presented with his Emerging Investigator Lectureship certificate. Details of his lectures will be announced in due course – keep an eye on the blog for details.

Read these Open Access articles by Rafal Klajn:

Spiropyran-based dynamic materials
Rafal Klajn
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 148-184
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60181A, Review Article,  Open Access

Dual-responsive nanoparticles that aggregate under the simultaneous action of light and CO2
Ji-Woong Lee and Rafal Klajn
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 2036-2039
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08541H, Communication,  Open Access

Magnetic field-induced self-assembly of iron oxide nanocubes
Gurvinder Singh, Henry Chan, T. Udayabhaskararao, Elijah Gelman, Davide Peddis, Artem Baskin, Gregory Leitus, Petr Král and Rafal Klajn
Faraday Discuss., 2015, 181, 403-421
DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00265B, Paper,  Open Access
From themed collection Nanoparticle Synthesis and Assembly

Controlling the lifetimes of dynamic nanoparticle aggregates by spiropyran functionalization
Pintu K. Kundu, Sanjib Das, Johannes Ahrens and Rafal Klajn
Nanoscale, 2016,8, 19280-19286
DOI: 10.1039/C6NR05959G, Paper,  Open Access

The Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship is an annual lectureship which recognises emerging scientists who have made a significant contribution to their research field.  Nominations for the 2018 Lectureship will open later in the year – keep an eye on the blog for details, and read more about our previous winners.

2016:     Gonçalo Bernardes from the University of Cambridge, UK

      Guihua Yu from the University of Texas at Austin, USA

2015:     Aron Walsh from the University of Bath, UK

2014:     Peng Chen from Peking University, Beijing, China

2013:     Xile Hu from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland

2012:     Xiaogang Liu from the National University of Singapore and Institute of Materials Research Engineering, A*STAR, Singapore

2011:     Cristina Nevado from the University of Zurich, Switzerland

2010:     Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China

2009:     Matt Gaunt from the University of Cambridge, UK

2008:     Kazuya Kikuchi from Osaka University, Japan

Read our excellent 2016 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigators themed issue and watch out for our upcoming Emerging Investigators issue next year.

 

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Optoacoustics for high resolution in vivo imaging

Optoacoustic imaging is an emerging new technology that is gaining momentum within the biomedical research community due to its enhanced capability to provide high-resolution in vivo imaging.

Fundamentally, it is a three-dimensional technique that combines features from optics and acoustics. First, tissue is illuminated using short-pulsed light radiation and then undergoes thermo-elastic expansion. This sudden and rapid expansion gives rise to pressure waves with ultrasonic frequency which are detected and analyzed to produce images for study or diagnosis.

Interestingly, the photoacoustic effect has been around since the 1800s however, the surge of interest in this technology has been dependent on the development of adequate laser sources, sensitive ultrasound detection and processing technologies in recent years.

A recent review by Dr. Xosé Luis Deán and Dr. Sven Gottschalk of the Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging in Neurhberg, Germany, Prof. Shy Shoham of the Israel Institute of Technology, and Dr. Ben Mc Larney and Prof. Daniel Razansky of the Technical University of Munich describes the development and new advancements in multiscale imaging of in vivo dynamics using optoacoustic methods.

Purely optical imaging techniques such as optical coherent tomography (OCT), fluorescent imaging and optical microscopies are broadly used for in vivo imaging and have led to numerous advances within medicine as function, disease progression and diagnosis at the cellular and biological scales can be analyzed in real-time. However, the limitation of purely optical techniques lies in resolving deep tissue processes. Beyond millimeter depth, photons are strongly scattered in biological tissues which limits spatial resolution and quantification. 

Optoacoustic imaging on the other hand, combines the best of two worlds by capitalizing on the advantages of both optics and ultrasound which enables multiscale, non-invasive imaging deep within the tissue. Many optoacoustic imaging systems also allow wavelength tenability, which allows a single device to serve multiple purposes.

The review outlines some ground-breaking applications that have come about as a result of advancements in optoacoustic images and sensing methods. These include large-scale neuroimaging, visualization of moving organs, contrast agent kinetics, pharmacokinetic and bio-distribution analysis, treatment monitoring, molecular imaging, cellular and sub-cellular function elucidation and three-dimensional handheld diagnostics of human subjects.

The development of advanced optoacoustic imaging techniques is adding to the toolset of biological imaging by filling gaps in established methods. Since it uses nonionizing visible/near infrared light, it is safe for patients and ideal for frequent-use in routine and preventative examinations. The promise shown in preclinical and early clinical studies as well as the surge of technological advancements provides a solid platform for the application of optoacoustic imaging in mainstream medicine.

To find out more see:

Advanced optoacoustic methods for multiscale imaging of in vivo dynamics
X.L. Deán-Ben, S. Gottschalk, B. Mc Larney, S. Shoham and D. Razansky
DOI: 10.1039/C6CS00765A


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.
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Outstanding Reviewers for Chemical Society Reviews in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Chemical Society Reviews in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Kamal Bisht, Ram Chandra Uniyal Post Graduate College

Dr Stephen Goldup, University of Southampton

Professor Graham Hutchings, Cardiff University

Professor Burkhard König, Universität Regensburg

Professor Jonathan Lovell, University at Buffalo

Professor Ian Manners, University of Bristol

Professor Shizhang Qiao, The University of Adelaide

Dr Eric Rivard, University of Alberta

Professor Rein Ulijn, CUNY Advanced Science Research Center

Professor Hua Zhang, Nanyang Technological University

We would also like to thank the Chemical Society Reviews board and the General Chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Royal Society of Chemistry and ACS Publications commit to ORCID integration

On 28 November 2016, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the American Chemical Society Publications Division, ACS Publications, both signed the ORCID Open Letter committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be found here: http://rsc.li/orcid

In brief, this partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations, thereby ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

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Chem Soc Rev 2016 Emerging Investigators themed issue – now published

We are pleased to announce that the Chemical Society Reviews 2016 Emerging Investigators themed issue is now available to read online.

This issue highlights the very best work from scientists in the early stages of their independent career.  This issue follows the great success of our 2014 Emerging Investigators Issue, as we have been overwhelmed by the community’s positive response.

This year’s issue includes a broad selection of reviews in various areas of chemistry, from catalysis to nanomedicine, together with materials and theoretical chemistry. Covering a wide geographic diversity – the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania – this issue also features our contributors’ profiles, with varied bios and colourful backgrounds including exciting barbecues, thrilling video games, vibrant Queen concerts and unforgettable Playmobils®!

Read our 2016 Emerging Investigators themed issue today

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Journal lectureships 2017 – nominations open!

Know an outstanding emerging scientist who deserves recognition? Nominate now for the 2017 ChemComm and Chem Soc RevEmerging Investigator Lectureships

We are pleased to welcome nominations for the 2017 Emerging Investigator Lectureships for ChemComm and Chem Soc Rev.

All nominations must be received by Monday, 30 January 2017.

Nominations are open for these journal lectureships – only one entry needed per nominee, as each nomination will be considered for both competitions as appropriate.

ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship
• Recognises emerging scientists in the early stages of their independent academic career
• Eligible nominees should have completed their PhD on or after the 15th September 2008, and should also have published as least one article in ChemComm during the course of their independent career

Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship
• Recognises emerging scientists who have made significant contributions to their research field
• Eligible nominees should have completed their PhD on or after the 15th September 2008

Lectureship details
• Recipients of these lectureships will each be invited to present a lecture at three different locations over a 12-month period, with at least one of these events taking place at an international conference.
• Each recipient will receive a contribution of £1500 towards travel and accommodation costs for their lectures, as well as a certificate.
• Recipients will be asked to contribute a review article for the specific journal awarding their lectureship.

How to nominate
Self-nomination is not permitted. Nominators must send the following to the editorial team via chemcomm-rsc@rsc.org OR chemsocrev-rsc@rsc.org by Monday, 30 January 2017. Each nomination will be considered for both lectureships.
• Recommendation letter, including the name, contact details and website URL of the nominee.
• A one-page CV for the nominee, including their date of birth, summary of education, career and key achievements, a list of up to five of their top independent publications, total numbers of publications and patents, and other indicators of esteem, together with evidence of career independence.
• A copy of the candidate’s best publication to date (as judged by the nominator).
• Two supporting letters of recommendation from two independent referees. These should not be someone from the same institution or the candidate’s post doc or PhD supervisor.

The nominator and independent referees should comment on the candidate’s presenting skills.

Incomplete nominations or those not adhering to the above requirements will not be considered, and nominees will not be contacted regarding any missing or incorrect documents.

Selection procedure
• The editorial team will screen each nomination for eligibility and draw up a shortlist of candidates based on the nomination documents provided.
• Shortlisted candidates will be asked to provide a brief supporting statement summarising their key achievements, highlighting the impact of their work and justifying why they deserve the specific lectureship for which they have been entered.
• Recipients of each lectureship will then be selected and endorsed by a selection panel composed of members of each journal’s Editorial Board. Winners of the lectureships will be announced in the first half of 2017.

NB: Please note that members of the selection panel from the ChemComm and Chem Soc Rev Editorial Boards are not eligible to nominate, or provide references, for these lectureships.

For any queries, please contact the editorial team at chemcomm-rsc@rsc.org or chemsocrev-rsc@rsc.org.

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CRISPR-Cas9 and the evolution of targeted genomic engineering

Written by Victoria Corless

Advances in the development of genomic engineering have unprecedented potential to make significant impacts on the future of health and research. Since their development, genetic editing tools have become a major hot topic not only within the scientific community but also with the general public. Precise and facile methods of modifying gene sequences provide us with the ability to understand and even cure some of our deadliest genetic diseases however, this has also raised ethical questions as to what can (and perhaps should) be achieved.

In their most basic form, genome editing technologies are proteins that can cleave DNA in a site specific manner and cause alterations such as inactivation of specific genes, correction of mutated sequences or insertion of intact genes into a target DNA sequence. This cumulates into a downstream phenotypic change within the cell that not only allows biologists to study normal gene function but also carries tremendous therapeutic relevance.

A recent Tutorial Review by Debojyoti Chakraborty and Souvik Maiti published in Chemical Society Reviews describes the development, evolution and future of genetic editing technologies and molecular tools such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), site specific recombinases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). Of those listed, the CRISPR-Cas9 system is by far the most precise, efficient, inexpensive and easy-to-use tool for genetic manipulation and has been proven to work on virtually any living cell in almost any organism. In the short amount of time since its development, CRISPR-Cas9 has reinvented the way in which scientists are carrying out genetic research and approaching gene therapy.

CRISPR-Cas9 is distinct from conventional gene therapies which are often only capable of crudely placing genetic material at a random location within the cell. The idea behind CRISPR-Cas9’s mechanism and its precision is derived from innate bacterial immune systems which use arrays of short repeats in the microbial genome, termed CRISPR, to protect themselves from foreign genetic material. The CRISPR-Cas9 system is made up of the Cas9 protein that snips the DNA strands and an RNA component that directs the complex to the correct sequence. The cell’s natural machinery then repairs the cut but it is error-prone and will likely make a mistake that will result in termination of that gene’s function. This allows scientists to determine the gene’s role in cellular function. An interesting example of this was recently published in Chemical Science by Peter Leadlay of Cambridge University and Yuhui Sun of Wuhan University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and describes the application of this genomics-based approach in determining the biosynthetic pathway of thiotetronate antibiotics. Alternatively, the cut can be repaired using a DNA template provided by the researchers to edit nearly any sequence at any site in the genome.

The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been demonstrated in numerous studies to be a highly efficient tool for gene-editing and has resulted in significant advancements within the field of genomics. There are however, as with any new technology, limitations and gaps in our understanding that need to be addressed before clinical applications can be considered. Unsurprisingly, a lot of research is being focused on tackling these issues. The potential to rewrite the human genome to alter disease states, perhaps enhance our ability to fight infectious diseases and even alter pathways involved in aging is incredible but will inevitably come with a spectrum of ethical, social and intellectual challenges. In any case, these are exciting times and these inventions stand to change the future of medicine.

To find out more see:

CRISPR/Cas9: a historical and chemical biology perspective of targeted genome engineering
Amrita Singh, Debojyoti Chakraborty and Souvik Maiti
DOI: 10.1039/C6CS00197A

A genomics-led approach to deciphering the mechanism of thiotetronate antibiotic biosynthesis
W. Tao, M. E. Yurkovich, S. Wen, K. E. Lebe, M. Samborskyy, Y. Liu, A. Yang, Y. Liu, Y. Ju, Z. Deng, M. Tosin, Y. Sun and P. F. Leadley
DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03059E


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.
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Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016

Congratulations to the winners this year

The prestigious Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016 was awarded jointly to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for their outstanding contributions to the design and synthesis of molecular machines. Many congratulations to all of them!

To mark this special occasion, we would like to highlight our most recent review on this area:

Matthew A. Watson and Scott L. Cockroft
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00874C

We also invite you to read the recent manuscripts published by the Nobel Prize winners in Chem Soc Rev and other journals in our portfolio:

Wavelength-selective cleavage of photoprotecting groups: strategies and applications in dynamic systems
Mickel J. Hansen, Willem A. Velema, Michael M. Lerch, Wiktor Szymanski and  Ben L. Feringa
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, 44, 3358-3377
DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00118H, Tutorial Review

Cooperative capture synthesis: yet another playground for copper-free click chemistry
Xisen Hou, Chenfeng Ke and  J. Fraser Stoddart
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2016, 45, 3766-3780
DOI: 10.1039/C6CS00055J, Tutorial Review

A metal–organic framework immobilised iridium pincer complex
Martino Rimoldi, Akitake Nakamura, Nicolaas A. Vermeulen, James J. Henkelis, Anthea K. Blackburn, Joseph T. Hupp, J. Fraser Stoddart and Omar K. Farha
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 4980-4984
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC01376G, Edge Article

End-capping of amphiphilic nanotubes with phospholipid vesicles: impact of the phospholipid on the cap formation and vesicle loading under osmotic conditions
Petra M. Erne, Peter Štacko, Derk Jan van Dijken, Jiawen Chen, Marc C. A. Stuart and Ben L. Feringa
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 11697-11700
DOI: 10.1039/C6CC05101D, Communication

Reversible gel–sol photoswitching with an overcrowded alkene-based bis-urea supergelator
Sander J. Wezenberg, Christelle M. Croisetu, Marc C. A. Stuart and Ben L. Feringa
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 4341-4346
DOI: 10.1039/C6SC00659K, Edge Article

Porphyrinic supramolecular daisy chains incorporating pillar[5]arene–viologen host–guest interactions
Maher Fathalla, Nathan L. Strutt, Srinivasan Sampath, Khabiboulakh Katsiev, Karel J. Hartlieb, Osman M. Bakr and J. Fraser Stoddart
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 10455-10458
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC03717D, Communication

Synthesis of a metal-free coordinating ring via formation of a cleavable [2]catenane
Frédéric Niess and Jean-Pierre Sauvage
Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 10790-10792
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC46452K, Communication

Great expectations: can artificial molecular machines deliver on their promise?
Ali Coskun, Michal Banaszak, R. Dean Astumian, J. Fraser Stoddart and Bartosz A. Grzybowski
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 19-30
DOI: 10.1039/C1CS15262A, Tutorial Review

If you wish, you can read all RSC manuscripts by Prof. Ben L. Feringa, by Prof Jean-Pierre Savage and by Sir J. Fraser Stoddart.

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Top 10 Reviewers for Chemical Society Reviews

Many thanks to our reviewers and community

In celebration of Peer Review Week, with the theme of Recognition for Review, we would like to highlight the top 10 reviewers for Chemical Society Reviews in 2016, as selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal.

Top 10 Reviewers for Chemical Society Reviews:
– Professor Jonathan Lovell – University of Buffalo, USA
– Professor Rein Ulijn – CUNY Advanced Science Research Center , USA
– Dr Chunyi Zhi – City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
– Dr Eric Rivard – University of Alberta, Canada
– Dr Jie-Peng Zhang – Sun Yat-Sen University, China
– Dr Kim Baines – University of Western Ontario, Canada
– Dr Stephen Goldup – University of Southampton , UK
– Professor Beat Fierz – EPFL, Switzerland
– Professor Graham Hutchings – Cardiff University , UK
– Professor Katsuhiko Ariga – National Institute for Materials Science, Japan

We would like to say a massive thank you to these reviewers as well as the Chemical Society Reviews board and all of the chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

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2016 Emerging Investigator Lectureship: Gonçalo Bernardes

Read more details about Dr Gonçalo Bernardes’s Lectureship

Dr Gonçalo Bernardes (University of Cambridge, UK), one of the winners of the 2016 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship, is currently on his Lectureship tour.

He graduated from the University of Lisbon in 2004 and completed his D.Phil. at the University of Oxford, UK in 2008 under the supervision of Professor Ben Davis working on reaction engineering for site-selective protein modification. He then undertook postdoctoral work at the Max-Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Germany under the guidance of Prof Peter Seeberger. He currently leads a research group at the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge where he holds a prestigious Royal Society University Research Fellowship.


Gonçalo recently attended the XXIV EFMC-ISMC Symposium, where he delivered his RSC Prize Lecture.

“Chemical Pharmacology of Protein Conjugates and Natural Products”
2016 Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator Lectureship
XXIV EFMC International Symposium on Medicinal Chemistry
28 August – 1 September 2016. Manchester, United Kingdom



He was also formally awarded his Lectureship certificate by Richard Kelly, Executive Editor (Royal Society of Chemistry).

Photograph: © Fabien Venturi
Richard Kelly (left) awards the Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigator
Lectureship 2016 to Dr Gonçalo Bernardes (right)



Did you know? Gonçalo kept a trip diary of his SAFEA-RSC Visiting Researcher Programme China, where he gave the first talk of his Chem Soc Rev Emerging Investigators Lectureship tour earlier this year.

Read more about his trip diary in China on MyRSC, the online chemistry community.

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