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Nominations are open for the inaugural PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship

We are delighted to announce we are welcoming nominations for the inaugural PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship. Launching this year, the lectureship will be awarded annually from 2016 onwards to recognise and support an emerging scientist working in physical chemistry, chemical physics or biophysical chemistry.

Lectureship details
The PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship recognises the significant contribution of an early career researcher in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry and is a platform for an early career physical chemist to showcase their research to the wider scientific community. The recipient will receive up to £1000 contribution towards travel and accommodation costs to attend and present at a leading international meeting hosted by the PCCP Ownership Board. The recipient will also be invited to contribute a Perspective article to PCCP.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates must:
•    Have completed their PhD and be pursuing an independent research career within physical chemistry, chemical physics or biophysical chemistry.
•    Be at an early stage of their independent career. Typically this will be within 10 years of completing their PhD, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path.

Selection criteria, nomination and judging process
•    Nominations must be made via email using the PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship nomination form and a letter of recommendation.
•    Individuals cannot nominate themselves for consideration.
•    The recipient will be selected by the PCCP Editorial Board at the 2016 PCCP Editorial Board meeting. Details of the PCCP Editorial Board can be found online at www.rsc.org/pccp.
•    The winner will be selected based on their nomination, with due consideration given to the letter of recommendation, candidate biography, research achievements, previous PCCP publications and overall publication history.

Submit a nomination
To be considered for the lectureship the following must be sent to the Editorial Office
•    A letter of recommendation
•    A complete nomination form

Submission deadline 2 September 2016

Submit nomination

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PCCP’s latest Impact Factor is 4.449

Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) is pleased to announce its latest Impact Factor is 4.449*

PCCP is dedicated to publishing cutting-edge original research across the fields of physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry. Last year we published 3425 articles, making PCCP the largest single journal in the physical chemistry field. Our wide reach in the community and rapid times to publication ensure your research gets the attention it deserves.

Lead by our Editorial Board Chair and Deputy Chair, our expert team of international Associate Editors and dedicated professional Editors ensure that PCCP is a home for urgent Communications & high quality Full Papers, authoritative Perspectives and community-led themed collections. PCCP is proud to be a society journal and is co-owned by 19 national chemical societies. The journal is published by the Royal Society of Chemistry on a not-for-profit basis for the benefit of the whole scientific community.

We would like to thank all our authors, readers, reviewers and Editorial & Advisory Board members for their continued support

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2015 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters).

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New partnership between Overleaf and Royal Society of Chemistry journal PCCP

Image of RSC and Overleaf logos

London – May 16: We are delighted to announce a new partnership between Overleaf and the Royal Society of Chemistry. Through this partnership, authors submitting to Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) will have access to the award-winning Overleaf collaborative cloud-based writing and reviewing tool with 1-click submission into the PCCP ScholarOne submission system.

A PCCP journal template is available within the Overleaf platform to help authors write, collaborate and publish their work in the correct journal format. Once authors are finished writing, they can quickly and easily submit to PCCP using the 1-click submission link within Overleaf. All files and necessary information will be seamlessly transferred to the PCCP submission system – greatly simplifying the author’s submission experience.

Caroline Burley, Journals Operations Manager, Publishing Services & Production at the Royal Society of Chemistry, says:

“Our authors want the submission process to be quick and simple, so we’re very pleased to be partnering with Overleaf to offer this benefit to PCCP’s authors. This development makes the process of submitting a paper to PCCP from the Overleaf platform as easy as the click of a button.”

John Hammersley, Founder & CEO of Overleaf says:

“I’m hugely excited for Overleaf to be able to support the Royal Society of Chemistry, the PCCP journal and their authors through this new partnership. Simplifying and streamlining an author’s writing and submission experience is a major goal for Overleaf and this partnership addresses that perfectly.”

Links to the template and Overleaf platform are available at the PCCP journal website.

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About The Royal Society of Chemistry
We are the oldest chemical society in the world and in 2016 we’re celebrating 175 years of progress and people in the chemical sciences. Throughout the year, we’re sharing the stories of how our members past and present have helped to change the world with chemistry.

With over 50,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the UK’s professional body for chemical scientists; a not-for-profit organisation with 175 years of history and an international vision of the future.

We promote, support and celebrate chemistry. We work to shape the future of the chemical sciences – for the benefit of science and humanity.

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About Overleaf
Founded in 2012 and with over 400,000 registered users, Overleaf is an academic authorship tool that allows seamless collaboration and effortless manuscript submission, all underpinned by cloud-technology. By providing an intuitive online collaborative writing and publishing platform, Overleaf is making the process of writing, editing and publishing scientific documents quicker and easier. Researchers and academics can now write, collaborate, and publish with a single click, directly from the Overleaf web-app. Publishers and Institutions are partnering with Overleaf to provide customized writing templates, simple reference tool linking, and one-click publishing submission links.

Supported by Digital Science, Overleaf aims to make science and research faster, more open and more transparent by bringing the whole scientific writing process into one place in the cloud – from idea, to writing, to review, to publication.

Follow @overleaf and @PCCP on Twitter.

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Themed collection now online: Electron delocalization and aromaticity

Cover image for Kekule issue showing a sketch of a benzene moleculeClick through to read the Themed Collection online: ‘‘Electron delocalization and aromaticity: 150 years of the Kekulé benzene structure’’

Guest Edited by Gabriel Merino and Miquel Solà this collection of articles celebrates the 150th anniversary of the seminal paper ‘‘Sur la constitution des substances aromatiques’’ by August Kekulé and presents a snapshot of present-day research in aromaticity.

All articles in the collection are free to access until 17 June 2016, including:

Editorial
Celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Kekulé benzene structure
Gabriel Merino and Miquel Sola
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 11587 DOI:10.1039/C6CP90088G

Perspective
Beyond organic chemistry: aromaticity in atomic clusters
Alexander I. Boldyrev and Lai-Sheng Wang
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 11589 DOI:10.1039/C5CP07465G

Communication
How does tetraphenylethylene relax from its excited states?
Antonio Prlj, Nađa Došlić and Clémence Corminboeuf
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 11606 DOI:10.1039/C5CP04546K

Paper
Computational study on donor–acceptor optical markers for Alzheimer’s disease: a game of charge transfer and electron delocalization
Francesca Peccati, Marta Wiśniewska, Xavier Solans-Monfort and Mariona Sodupe
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 11634 DOI:10.1039/C5CP07274C

Click through to read the full collection online: ‘Electron delocalization and aromaticity: 150 years of the Kekulé benzene structure’, free to access until 17 June 2016

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PCCP Tulip2015 Awards

We are delighted to announce the winners of the PCCP Tulip2015 awards that were given at the Tulip2015 Summer School on Modern Developments in Spectroscopy in Noordwijk in the Netherlands. This year, there were two winners of the prize, best presentation went to Sana Habka of CEA Saclay, France for her poster on “Gas Phase Spectroscopy of Zwitterionic Complexes” and best layout went to Ana Krin of Max-Planck-Institut für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie, Hamburg, Germany  for her poster on “Enantiomer Identification in Mixtures Using Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy”. The winners each received a certificate and a cash prize.

Pictured (left): Prof. Wybren Jan Buma (co-chair of the Tulip Summer School), Prof. Jennifer Herek (co-chair of the Tulip VI Summer School), Sana Habka (PCCP Poster prize winner for best presentation) and Prof. Paul Corkum (lecturer at Tulip2015 and presenting the award on behalf of the committee of all 6 Tulip lecturers).

Pictured (right): Prof. Wybren Jan Buma, Prof. Jennifer Herek, Prof. Paul Corkum, and Ana Krin (PCCP Poster prize winner for best poster layout/text).

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Fundamental processes in semiconductor nanocrystals – PCCP themed issue online now

PCCP is delighted to present a themed collection which includes a number of great articles on Fundamental Processes in Semiconductor Nanocrystals. The issue was guest edited by Efrat Lifshitz (Technion, Israel) and Laurens Siebbeles (TU Delft, The Netherlands) and brings together a collection of contributed papers that cover current interest in a wide variety of topics associated with semiconductor crystals. You can read the Guest Editor’s full introduction to the issue in their Editorial.

There are a number of great contributions in this issue, including:

Influence of nanoparticle shape on charge transport and recombination in polymer/nanocrystal solar cells
Zhe Li, Weiyuan Wang, Neil C. Greenham and Christopher R. McNeill
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014,16, 25684-25693

Multiple exciton generation in cluster-free alloy CdxHg1−xTe colloidal quantum dots synthesized in water
Stephen V. Kershaw, Sergii Kalytchuk, Olga Zhovtiuk, Qing Shen, Takuya Oshima, Witoon Yindeesuk, Taro Toyoda and Andrey L. Rogach
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014,16, 25710-25722

Take a look at the themed collection online now to see all of the great contributions!


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Out of the frying pan and into the atmosphere: PCCP article in Chemistry World

Researchers at the University of Reading have come closer to understanding why fatty acids, emitted in significant quantities by fast food outlets cooking meat, persist for so long in the atmosphere.

Out of the fying pan and into the atmosphere

Christian Pfrang and colleagues, studied the ozone oxidation kinetics of methyl oleate monolayers at the air–water interface using experiments designed to mimic the atmospheric degradation of aerosols formed from fatty acid surfactants and moisture droplets. The experiments were carried out by skimming a fine beam of neutrons off a free air–water interface while the oxidation reaction took place. They found that the methyl ester monolayers broke down much faster than expected based on reported lifetimes in the atmosphere, suggesting that the long-chain organics are taken up into the droplet itself, where they are protected from further ozonolysis.

The presence of particulate matter in the atmosphere is a major health concern and may ultimately have significant climate change implications. Reports suggest that around a third of directly emitted aerosols above central London come from cooking, the majority of which are rich in oleic acid derivatives produced by cooking meat. These types of emissions are on the rise as vehicles move towards biofuels, another source of fatty acid methyl esters.

Interested to know more?

Read the full article by Richard Massey in Chemistry World here…

Read the article in PCCP:

Ozonolysis of methyl oleate monolayers at the air–water interface: oxidation kinetics, reaction products and atmospheric implications
Christian Pfrang, Federica Sebastiani, Claire O. M. Lucas, Martin D. King, Ioan D. Hoare, Debby Chang and Richard A. Campbell 
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CP00775A

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Centrifuge spectroscopy probes extreme rotational states: PCCP article in Chemistry World

A new spectroscopic technique for studying electronically excited molecules at very high angular momentum has been developed and tested by scientists in Canada.

The team, from the University of British Columbia, headed by Valery Milner, have used an optical centrifuge to excite oxygen to rotational states that otherwise can’t be reached. An optical centrifuge combines two laser pulses to create an intense electric field which undergoes angular acceleration to drive molecules into the remarkable angular momentum states. The super rotation state reached for oxygen in the study is equivalent to heating the molecule to 50,000K, a temperature that is too hot for the molecule to survive. A spectroscopic technique called resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionisation was combined with the centrifuge and by carefully controlling and calibrating the rotational speed of the centrifuge a spectrum can be viewed as a two-dimensional function of photon energy and angular momentum.

‘It greatly simplifies the spectra,’ says Aleksey Korobenko, the lead scientist on this study. ‘Even when the photon energy branches are overlapping, you can track one by one the rotational peaks which you can’t otherwise separate out.’

Interested to know more?

Read the full article by Rachel Wood in Chemistry World here…

Read the article in PCCP:

Rotational spectroscopy with an optical centrifuge
Aleksey Korobenko, Alexander A. Milner, John W. Hepburn and Valery Milner
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP54598A, Paper

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Imaging molecular dynamics – PCCP themed collection, Issue 2

Graphical abstract: Front coverPCCP is delighted to present its current issue which includes an excellent collection of articles on the theme of  Imaging molecular dynamics, Guest Edited by Mike Ashfold and David Parker. Read their editorial to find out more about some of the latest developments in this exciting field.

The outside front cover features a A velocity map imaging study of the photodissociation of the à state of ammoniaby Javier D. Rodríguez, Marta G. González, Luis Rubio-Lago and Luis Bañares.

Imaging molecular dynamics themed collection features a broad range of Papers and Communications and features the following Perspective articles:

Velocity map imaging of ion–molecule reactions
Roland Wester
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP53405G

Fast sensors for time-of-flight imaging applications
Claire Vallance, Mark Brouard, Alexandra Lauer, Craig S. Slater, Edward Halford, Benjamin Winter, Simon J. King, Jason W. L. Lee, Daniel E. Pooley, Iain Sedgwick, Renato Turchetta, Andrei Nomerotski, Jaya John John and Laura Hill
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP53183J

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This week’s HOT articles

Take a look at this week’s HOT articles, which are free to access for a limited time: Graphical abstract: Electrochemistry at nanometer-sized electrodes

Electrochemistry at nanometer-sized electrodes
Shengli Chen and Yuwen Liu
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP53773K, Perspective

Nanoscale resolution scanning thermal microscopy using carbon nanotube tipped thermal probes
Peter D. Tovee, Manuel E. Pumarol, Mark C. Rosamond, Robert Jones, Michael C. Petty, Dagou A. Zeze and Oleg V. Kolosov
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP53047G, Paper

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