Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Borders in science and nations are artificial. Should we have borders within India?

Read Professor E. Arunan’s thought-provoking arguments for a world without borders:

Borders in science and nations are artificial. Should we have borders within India? 
E. Arunan
Current Science, 2017, 112 (3), 435-436.

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Fundamental processes in semiconductor nanocrystals – PCCP themed issue online now

PCCP is delighted to present a themed collection which includes a number of great articles on Fundamental Processes in Semiconductor Nanocrystals. The issue was guest edited by Efrat Lifshitz (Technion, Israel) and Laurens Siebbeles (TU Delft, The Netherlands) and brings together a collection of contributed papers that cover current interest in a wide variety of topics associated with semiconductor crystals. You can read the Guest Editor’s full introduction to the issue in their Editorial.

There are a number of great contributions in this issue, including:

Influence of nanoparticle shape on charge transport and recombination in polymer/nanocrystal solar cells
Zhe Li, Weiyuan Wang, Neil C. Greenham and Christopher R. McNeill
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014,16, 25684-25693

Multiple exciton generation in cluster-free alloy CdxHg1−xTe colloidal quantum dots synthesized in water
Stephen V. Kershaw, Sergii Kalytchuk, Olga Zhovtiuk, Qing Shen, Takuya Oshima, Witoon Yindeesuk, Taro Toyoda and Andrey L. Rogach
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014,16, 25710-25722

Take a look at the themed collection online now to see all of the great contributions!


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Out of the frying pan and into the atmosphere: PCCP article in Chemistry World

Researchers at the University of Reading have come closer to understanding why fatty acids, emitted in significant quantities by fast food outlets cooking meat, persist for so long in the atmosphere.

Out of the fying pan and into the atmosphere

Christian Pfrang and colleagues, studied the ozone oxidation kinetics of methyl oleate monolayers at the air–water interface using experiments designed to mimic the atmospheric degradation of aerosols formed from fatty acid surfactants and moisture droplets. The experiments were carried out by skimming a fine beam of neutrons off a free air–water interface while the oxidation reaction took place. They found that the methyl ester monolayers broke down much faster than expected based on reported lifetimes in the atmosphere, suggesting that the long-chain organics are taken up into the droplet itself, where they are protected from further ozonolysis.

The presence of particulate matter in the atmosphere is a major health concern and may ultimately have significant climate change implications. Reports suggest that around a third of directly emitted aerosols above central London come from cooking, the majority of which are rich in oleic acid derivatives produced by cooking meat. These types of emissions are on the rise as vehicles move towards biofuels, another source of fatty acid methyl esters.

Interested to know more?

Read the full article by Richard Massey in Chemistry World here…

Read the article in PCCP:

Ozonolysis of methyl oleate monolayers at the air–water interface: oxidation kinetics, reaction products and atmospheric implications
Christian Pfrang, Federica Sebastiani, Claire O. M. Lucas, Martin D. King, Ioan D. Hoare, Debby Chang and Richard A. Campbell  
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CP00775A

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Centrifuge spectroscopy probes extreme rotational states: PCCP article in Chemistry World

A new spectroscopic technique for studying electronically excited molecules at very high angular momentum has been developed and tested by scientists in Canada.

The team, from the University of British Columbia, headed by Valery Milner, have used an optical centrifuge to excite oxygen to rotational states that otherwise can’t be reached. An optical centrifuge combines two laser pulses to create an intense electric field which undergoes angular acceleration to drive molecules into the remarkable angular momentum states. The super rotation state reached for oxygen in the study is equivalent to heating the molecule to 50,000K, a temperature that is too hot for the molecule to survive. A spectroscopic technique called resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionisation was combined with the centrifuge and by carefully controlling and calibrating the rotational speed of the centrifuge a spectrum can be viewed as a two-dimensional function of photon energy and angular momentum.

‘It greatly simplifies the spectra,’ says Aleksey Korobenko, the lead scientist on this study. ‘Even when the photon energy branches are overlapping, you can track one by one the rotational peaks which you can’t otherwise separate out.’

Interested to know more?

Read the full article by Rachel Wood in Chemistry World here…

Read the article in PCCP:

Rotational spectroscopy with an optical centrifuge
Aleksey Korobenko, Alexander A. Milner, John W. Hepburn and Valery Milner
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP54598A, Paper

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This week’s HOT articles

Take a look at this week’s HOT articles, which are free to access for a limited time: Graphical abstract: Electrochemistry at nanometer-sized electrodes

Electrochemistry at nanometer-sized electrodes
Shengli Chen and Yuwen Liu
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP53773K, Perspective

Nanoscale resolution scanning thermal microscopy using carbon nanotube tipped thermal probes
Peter D. Tovee, Manuel E. Pumarol, Mark C. Rosamond, Robert Jones, Michael C. Petty, Dagou A. Zeze and Oleg V. Kolosov
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP53047G, Paper

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This week’s HOT articles

Take a look at this week’s selection…

Cost-effective CO2 capture based on in silico screening of zeolites and process optimization
M. M. Faruque Hasan, Eric L. First and Christodoulos A. Floudas

New insights into the dynamics and morphology of P3HT:PCBM active layers in bulk heterojunctions

Jan-Michael Y. Carrillo, Rajeev Kumar, Monojoy Goswami, Bobby G. Sumpter and W. Michael Brown  

Effective management of passive layers using composite cathodes in solid state magnesium batteries

Mosarrat Perween, Rajeev Gupta, Babulal Rebary, Vaibhav Kulshrestha and Divesh N. Srivastava

The relative roles of electrostatics and dispersion in the stabilization of halogen bonds
Kevin E. Riley and Pavel Hobza  

Toward the creation of stable, functionalized metal clusters
Yuichi Negishi, Wataru Kurashige, Yoshiki Niihori and Katsuyuki Nobusada  

Effective shell layer thickness of platinum for oxygen reduction reaction alloy catalysts
Naoto Todoroki, Yu Asakimori and Toshimasa Wadayama  

Effect of interactions with the chaperonin cavity on protein folding and misfolding
Anshul Sirur, Michael Knott and Robert B. Best

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PCCP Board member reflects on the future of chemistry research in India

PCCP Advisory Board member Professor Elangannan Arunan has co-authored a report in Angewandte Chemie on the excellent potential of Indian chemistry and how it can be best realised.

The authors ideas include improving access to start-up grants for new faculty members and encouraging the funding of new, untested ideas.

Check out these excellent PCCP Perspectives (co-)authored by researchers working in India:

Design and development of quantum dots and other nanoparticles based cellular imaging probe

Nikhil R. Jana
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP00726A

Do N-heterocyclic aromatic rings prefer π-stacking?
Mridula Guin , G. Naresh Patwari , S. Karthikeyan and Kwang S. Kim
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP02015J

The hydrogen bond: a molecular beam microwave spectroscopist’s view with a universal appeal
Mausumi Goswami and E. Arunan
DOI: 10.1039/B907708A

You may also be interested to read Prof. Arunan’s “Editor’s Choice” selection of articles in PCCP on a theme of bonding, reaction kinetics and dynamics.

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