Author Archive

Celebrating Women in Chemistry on the 150th Anniversary of Marie Curie’s Birthday

November 7, 2017 is the 150th anniversary of Marie Skłodowska-Curie‘s birthday. Curie’s life exemplified the challenges that women aspiring to creative and rewarding intellectual endeavours faced even in the Age of Enlightenment.  Today, we are fortunate to live in a time when college education and science careers are open to women (at least, in most countries). Yet, there are still many barriers, biases, and inequalities that women pursuing careers in science and technology face.  One pervasive problem is a perception of intellectual inferiority of women; examples include public remarks by former Harvard president Larry Summers and a recent manifesto of a Google engineer. What I find mind-boggling is that these beliefs survive despite overwhelming objective evidence of female excellence in STEM fields. However, the perception is reinforced by another phenomenon: under-appreciation and under-recognition of women’s contributions and achievements in STEM.

To mark the 150th birthday of Marie Curie, the Journal of Physical Chemistry has published a compilation of papers highlighting female physical chemists. The breadth of topics covered in these papers and the quality of science they present make a powerful statement.  The Editorial shares several facts about the history of female authorship, including the reference to Curie’s 1901 paper, which is believed to be the first paper by a female author published in the journal.

At PCCP we have an ongoing commitment to diversity, and proud history of publishing work from female authors and striving to ensure a balanced Editorial Board which is reflective of the field. Yet, of course more work towards achieving a level playing field will be done.

To celebrate Marie Curie’s birthday, we have collated a gallery of cover images of PCCP papers to highlight just some of the excellent contributions made to the journal by female scientists in the physical chemistry field. We hope you enjoy them.

Anna KrylovPCCP Editorial Board member

The articles include:

In search of metal hydrides: an X-ray absorption and emission study of [NiFe] hydrogenase model complexes
Serena DeBeer et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 10688. DOI: 10.1039/C5CP07293J

The role of alkali metal cations in the stabilization of guanine quadruplexes: why K+ is the best
Fonseca Guerra et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 20895. DOI: 10.1039/C6CP01030J

Phosphine passivated gold clusters: how charge transfer affects electronic structure and stability
Doreen Mollenhauer and Nicola Gaston
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 29686. DOI: 10.1039/C6CP04562F

Chirped-pulse Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy of ten vibrationally excited states of i-propyl cyanide: exploring the far-infrared region
Amanda L. Steber, Melanie Schnell et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 1751. DOI: 10.1039/C6CP06297K

Fingerprints of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in saligenin–water clusters revealed by mid- and far-infrared spectroscopy
Marie-Pierre Gaigeot, Edwin L. Sibert III, Anouk M. Rijs et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 20343. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP01951C

Dewetting acrylic polymer films with water/propylene carbonate/surfactant mixtures – implications for cultural heritage conservation
Debora Berti et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 23723. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP02608K

The effect of π-stacking, H-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine–adenine, thymine–thymine and adenine–thymine dimers
Krylov et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 2292. DOI: 10.1039/B919930F

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From a PCCP Associate Editor’s Desk

Professor Ayyappanpillai Ajayghosh, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST)

Dr. Ayyappanpillai Ajayaghosh is the Director of the CSIR-National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (CSIR-NIIST), Thiruvananthapuram, India and is a Professor and former Dean of Chemical Sciences, Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR). His research contributions are in the interdisciplinary areas of organic photoresponsive materials, supramolecular chemistry, molecular self-assembly, organogels, molecular probes and sensors. He has developed a new class of functional soft materials namely pi-gels having potential applications in energy harvesting, sensing and security materials. His scientific contributions are recognized with the prestigious awards a few of these includes Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize for Chemical Sciences (2007), the Infosys Science Prize (2012), the Silver Medal of the Chemical Research Society of India (2013), the TWAS Prize for Chemistry (2013) and the J. C. Bose National Fellowship (2015). He is a fellow of the three major science academies of India and is a fellow of the World Academy of Sciences. He is an Associate Editor of PCCP and shares some of his thoughts & experiences.

 

Question: Could you share a short story on your most inspiring/satisfying research?

Answer: I believe my main contribution in science is the development of a new class of soft materials called π-gels made of self-assembled π-conjugated molecules. Most of these materials are fluorescent which a sensitive property is and hence these materials have potential applications in sensing, imaging and security. Our contributions in this area are well recognized nationally and internationally. It is very satisfying to note that the scientific community across the globe recognizes us.

 

Question: What, in your opinion has been the most exciting part of being an Associate Editor?

Answer: Associating with a journal from Royal Society of Chemistry is a prestige to any chemist, so is for me. The most exciting and interesting aspect, being an Associate Editor is the opportunity to read articles fresh before publishing. I enjoyed reading some of the best Physical Chemistry related work on soft materials. It is also exciting to see that many of the young researchers are impressed by the quality of PCCP and therefore submission to PCCP from India is going up.

 

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Chemical Bonding and Reactivity Spanning the Periodic Table: A Symposium in Honor of Roald Hoffmann

PCCP recently sponsored the symposium “Chemical Bonding and Reactivity Spanning the Periodic Table: A Symposium in Honor of Roald Hoffmann”, which was held at the 254th American Chemical Society meeting in Washington DC, August 20-24, 2017.

This symposium honored distinguished American Chemist and Nobel Prize winner, Prof. Hoffmann, who turned 80 years old this summer. Prof. Hoffmann has been influential in shaping the thinking of chemists working in a plethora of different fields – as evidenced by the talks given in the symposium by around 75 Hoffmann alumni, collaborators and friends, which showcased research in theoretical approaches to organic, organometallic, inorganic, biological and materials chemistry, as well as how matter responds to conditions of extreme external pressure.

Primarily experimental work was also featured in the symposium, and a historical lecture about Hoffmann’s role in the development of the “Woodward-Hoffmann” rules was given. Many of the speakers also highlighted Hoffmann’s role as a wonderful mentor, patient teacher and inspiring collaborator, as well as his artistic and humanistic endeavors.

PCCP was delighted to be involved with the meeting, and support our authors in discussing and advance their fields by participating at the symposium.

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Open for Nominations: 2017 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship

We are delighted to announce we are now welcoming nominations for the 2017 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship.

Lectureship details
Recognizing and supporting the significant contribution of early career researchers in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry, the lectureship is a platform for an early career physical chemist to showcase their research to the wider scientific community.

The recipient will receive £1000 to cover travel and accommodation costs to attend and present at a leading international meeting hosted by a PCCP Owner society. The recipient will also be invited to contribute a Perspective article to PCCP.

Launched with great success in 2016, last year’s winner, Dr David Glowacki, delivered the 2016 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship presentation at the Faraday Joint Interest Group Conference 2017.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates must:
•    Have completed their PhD 

•    Be actively pursuing an independent research career within physical chemistry, chemical physics or biophysical chemistry.
•    Be at an early stage of their independent career (typically this will be within 10 years of completing their PhD, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path.)

Selection criteria, nomination and judging process
•    Nominations must be made via email to pccp-rsc@rsc.org using the PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship nomination form and a letter of recommendation.
•    Individuals cannot nominate themselves for consideration.
•    Selection will be made by the PCCP Editorial Board at the 2017 PCCP Editorial Board meeting.
•    The winner will be selected based on their nomination, with due consideration given to the letter of recommendation, candidate biography, research achievements, previous PCCP publications and overall publication history.

Submit a nomination
To be considered for the 2017 lectureship, the following must be sent to the Editorial Office
•    A letter of recommendation
•    A complete nomination form

Submission deadline: 15th August 2017

Download nomination form

Submit nomination with letter of recommendation

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PCCP’s latest Impact Factor: 4.123

Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) is pleased to announce its latest Impact Factor is 4.123*

PCCP is dedicated to publishing cutting-edge original research across the fields of physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry. Last year we published 3443 articles, making PCCP the largest single journal in the physical chemistry field. Our wide reach in the community and rapid times to publication of 54 days** from receipt to acceptance ensure your research gets the attention it deserves.

Lead by our Editorial Board Chair (Seong Keun Kim, Seoul National University) and Deputy Chair (David Rueda, Imperial College London), our expert team of international Associate Editors and dedicated professional Editors ensure that PCCP is a home for urgent Communications & high quality Full Papers, authoritative Perspectives and community-led themed collections.

PCCP is proud to be a society journal and is co-owned by 19 national chemical societies. The journal is published by the Royal Society of Chemistry on a not-for-profit basis for the benefit of the whole scientific community.

We would like to thank all our authors, readers, reviewers and Editorial & Advisory Board members for their continued support

Find the all the RSC’s journals newly published 2016 Impact Factors* here.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2016 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters).

**2016 average

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Faraday Joint Interest Group Conference 2017

11 – 13 April 2017

University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

This meeting is the first of its kind, and aims to bring the UK Physical Chemistry community together once every 2-3 years to highlight excellent research. The aim of the conference is to increase the visibility of the UK physical chemistry community and encourage links with international researchers as well as those in industry.

Confirmed Plenary Speakers:
Sir Fraser Stoddart (2016 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Northwestern University)
Professor Chris Dobson (University of Cambridge)
Professor Ifor Samuel (University of St Andrews)
Professor Peter Bruce (University of Oxford)
Dr. Józef Lewandowski (University of Warwick)

Dr. David Glowacki, will be giving his PCCP Emerging Lectureship Award talk at the conference on Wednesday 12th April, presented by PCCP Deputy Editor, Katie Lim.

Visit the website to register or for more details. Registration closes: 28 March 2017

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International Symposium on Molecular Beams 2017

The ISMB2017 is the 27th edition of the International Symposium on Molecular Beams which will take place from 25 – 30 June 2017 in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Chaired this year by Bas van de Meerakker (Radboud University), and Anouk Rijs (Radboud University, PCCP Associate Editor) the conference promises a stimulating and interesting scientific program with oral and poster presentations, lively discussions with other scientists in the field and social events.

Invited speakers at the event include: Mattanjah de Vries (University of California Santa Barbara, USA, PCCP Advisory Board)Luis Bañares (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain, PCCP Associate Editor), and Dan Neumark (University of California Berkeley, USA, PCCP Advisory Board).

Register now: early bird registration closes 1st April. For more information visit the conference website.

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2017 PCCP – Chemical Society of Japan Prizes

PCCP are delighted to announce the winners of the 2017 PCCP Prizes for Outstanding Achievement of Young Scientists in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics. These were awarded  at a prize ceremony held at the 97th Annual Meeting of the Chemical Society of Japan on the 16th March in Tokyo, Japan.  The winners each received a commemorative book and a PCCP Prize certificate.

 

From left: Prof. Yasuhiro Iwasawa (University of Electro-Communications, former CSJ president, founder of PCCP-CSJ award); Prof. Ryou Kubota (prize winner); Prof. Kenta Mizuse (prize winner); Prof. Miho Hatanaka (prize winner); Prof. Hisashi Yamamoto (Chubu University, Current CSJ President); Sarah Thomas (RSC Program Manager); Robert Parker (RSC Chief Executive Officer); Hiromitsu Urakami (RSC Manager, Japan); Prof. Mitsuo Sawamoto (Kyoto University)

(1) Dr. Ryou Kubota
Assistant Professor

Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University  
Artificial Regulation and Imitation of Living Systems based on Supramolecular Coordination Chemistry

 

(2) Dr. Kenta Mizuse
Assistant Professor
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Department of Chemistry, School of Science
“Direct imaging study of gas-phase ultrafast molecular dynamics using a newly developed space-slice ion imaging technique”

 

(3) Dr. Miho Hatanaka
Assistant Professor

Department of Chemistry,
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kindai University
Theoretical Study of the Lanthanide Chemistry: structural fluctuation, catalytic ability, and luminescence

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