Author Archive

PCCP Themed Collection: Theory, experiment, and simulations in laboratory astrochemistry

Guest-edited by Laurent Wiesenfeld (Université Grenoble Alpes), Allan Shi-Chung Cheung (The University of Hong Kong) and Jos Oomens (Radboud University), this themed issue of PCCP overviews the recent developments showing physical insights in the areas of theory, experiment, and simulation as applied to molecular astrophysics environments.

Read the full collection here now!

It includes:

Editorial 
Theory, experiment, and simulations in laboratory astrochemistry
Laurent Wiesenfeld, Jos Oomens and Allan S. C. Cheung
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 5341-5343. DOI: 10.1039/C8CP90026D

Perspective 
Spectroscopy of prospective interstellar ions and radicals isolated in para-hydrogen matrices
Masashi Tsuge, Chih-Yu Tseng and Yuan-Pern Lee
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 5344-5358. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP05680J

Paper 
A general method for the inclusion of radiation chemistry in astrochemical models
Christopher N. Shingledecker and Eric Herbst
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 5359-5367. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP05901A

Paper 
Radiation chemistry of solid acetone in the interstellar medium – a new dimension to an old problem
L. Hudson
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 5389-5398. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP06431D

Paper 
Dissociative ionisation of adamantane: a combined theoretical and experimental study
Alessandra Candian, Jordy Bouwman, Patrick Hemberger, Andras Bodi and Alexander G. G. M. Tielens
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 5399-5406. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP05957D

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Open for Nominations: 2018 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship

Lectureship details
Recognizing and supporting the significant contribution of early career researchers in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry, the lectureship is a platform for an early career physical chemist to showcase their research to the wider scientific community.

The recipient will receive £1000 to cover travel and accommodation costs to attend and present at a leading international meeting hosted by a PCCP Owner society. The recipient will also be invited to contribute a Perspective article to PCCP.

Launched with great success in 2016, previous winner’s include: 

Dr David Glowacki, University of Bristol (2016 winner) and

Professor Ryan P. Steele, University of Utah (2017 winner).

Read a selection of their work in the PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship Themed Collection.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates must:
•    Have completed their PhD 

•    Be actively pursuing an independent research career within physical chemistry, chemical physics or biophysical chemistry.
•    Be at an early stage of their independent career (typically this will be within 10 years of completing their PhD, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path).

Selection criteria, nomination and judging process
•    Nominations must be made via email to pccp-rsc@rsc.org using the PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship nomination form and a letter of recommendation.
•    Individuals cannot nominate themselves for consideration.
•    Selection will be made by the PCCP Editorial Board at the 2018 PCCP Editorial Board meeting.
•    The winner will be selected based on their nomination, with due consideration given to the letter of recommendation, candidate biography, research achievements, previous PCCP publications and overall publication history.

Submit a nomination
To be considered for the 2018 Lectureship, the following must be sent to the Editorial Office
•    A letter of recommendation
•    A complete nomination form

Submission deadline: 20th June 2018

Download nomination form

Submit nomination with letter of recommendation

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Mourning the loss of Professor Gaoquan Shi

Photograph of Gaoquan Shi

We are sad to announce that Professor Gaoquan Shi passed away on the 1st March 2018. Gaoquan will be sorely missed by PCCP and the entire community. A PCCP Associate Editor for over five years, his contributions to the journal, field and community were widespread.

As a Professor of Chemistry at Tsinghua University, his research interests were focused on functional polymers, especially the syntheses and applications of conducting polymers and carbon nanomaterials.

A selection of Gaoquan’s recently published articles are highlighted below in his memory.

Paper 
High-performance gas sensors based on a thiocyanate ion-doped organometal halide perovskite
Yue Zhuang, Wenjing Yuan, Liu Qian, Shan Chen and Gaoquan Shi
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 12876-12881. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP01646H

Communication 
Pyridinic nitrogen-rich carbon nanocapsules from a bioinspired polydopamine derivative for highly efficient electrocatalytic oxygen reduction
Zhengran Yi, Zheye Zhang, Shuai Wang and Gaoquan Shi
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2017, 5, 519-523. DOI: 10.1039/C6TA09315A
 
Edge Article 
Water-enhanced oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide with controlled species of oxygenated groups
Ji Chen, Yao Zhang, Miao Zhang, Bowen Yao, Yingru Li, Liang Huang, Chun Li and Gaoquan Shi
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 1874-1881. DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03828F

Review Article 
Flexible graphene devices related to energy conversion and storage
Xiluan Wang and Gaoquan Shi
Energy Environ. Sci., 2015, 8, 790-823. DOI: 10.1039/C4EE03685A

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Themed collection now online: Complex molecular systems: supramolecules, biomolecules and interfaces

We are delighted to announce that the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) themed collection Complex molecular systems: supramolecules, biomolecules and interfaces is now online. 

It includes:

Editorial 
Complex molecular systems: a frontier of molecular science
Tahei Tahara, Akio Kitao, Yasuhisa Mizutani, Hideki Kandori and Masaaki Fujii
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 2945-2946. DOI: 10.1039/C8CP90010H

Perspective 
Multiscale methods framework: self-consistent coupling of molecular theory of solvation with quantum chemistry, molecular simulations, and dissipative particle dynamics
Andriy Kovalenko and Sergey Gusarov
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 2947-2969. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP05585D

Communication 
The effect of regioisomerism on the photophysical properties of alkylated-naphthalene liquids
Narayan, K. Nagura, T. Takaya, K. Iwata, A. Shinohara, H. Shinmori, H. Wang, Q. Li, X. Sun, H. Li, S. Ishihara and T. Nakanishi
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 2970-2975. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP05584F

Paper 
Protonation/reduction dynamics at the [4Fe–4S] cluster of the hydrogen-forming cofactor in [FeFe]-hydrogenases
Moritz Senger, Stefan Mebs, Jifu Duan, Olga Shulenina, Konstantin Laun, Leonie Kertess, Florian Wittkamp, Ulf-Peter Apfel, Thomas Happe, Martin Winkler, Michael Haumann and Sven T. Stripp
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 3128-3140. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP04757F

Paper 
Analysis of the conformational properties of amine ligands at the gold/water interface with QM, MM and QM/MM simulations
Dongyue Liang, Jiewei Hong, Dong Fang, Joseph W. Bennett, Sara E. Mason, Robert J. Hamers and Qiang Cui
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 3349-3362. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP06709G

We hope you enjoy reading the articles. Please get in touch if you have any questions about this themed collection or PCCP.

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2017 PCCP HOT Articles collection – online and free to access

This collection showcases all 2017 Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) articles highlighted as HOT by the handling editor.  Congratulations to all the authors whose articles are featured.

Read it here now for free until the end of February 2018!

It includes:

Perspective 
Solid surface vs. liquid surface: nanoarchitectonics, molecular machines, and DNA origami
Katsuhiko Ariga, Taizo Mori, Waka Nakanishi and Jonathan P. Hill
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 23658-23676. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP02280H

Perspective 
Carbon nitrides: synthesis and characterization of a new class of functional materials
S. Miller, A. Belen Jorge, T. M. Suter, A. Sella, F. Corà and P. F. McMillan
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 15613-15638. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP02711G

Perspective 
Curly arrows, electron flow, and reaction mechanisms from the perspective of the bonding evolution theory
Juan Andrés, Patricio González-Navarrete, Vicent Sixte Safont and Bernard Silvi
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 29031-29046. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP06108K

Communication 
Mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic reaction responsible for the high cost of hydrogen fuel cells
Tao Cheng, William A Goddard, Qi An, Hai Xiao, Boris Merinov and Sergey Morozov
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 2666-2673. DOI: 10.1039/C6CP08055C

Paper 
Influence of orientation mismatch on charge transport across grain boundaries in tri-isopropylsilylethynyl (TIPS) pentacene thin films
Florian Steiner, Carl Poelking, Dorota Niedzialek, Denis Andrienko and Jenny Nelson
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 10854-10862. DOI: 10.1039/C6CP06436A

Paper 
Influence of cations in lithium and magnesium polysulphide solutions: dependence of the solvent chemistry
Georg Bieker, Julia Wellmann, Martin Kolek, Kirsi Jalkanen, Martin Winter and Peter Bieker
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 11152-11162. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP01238A

Paper 
Covalent-reaction-induced interfacial assembly to transform doxorubicin into nanophotomedicine with highly enhanced anticancer efficiency
Chenchen Qin, Jinbo Fei, Ganglong Cui, Xiangyang Liu, Weihai Fang, Xiaoke Yang, Xingcen Liu and Junbai Li
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 23733-23739. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP02543B

We hope you enjoy reading the articles.

Is your research HOT? Our editors are already handpicking the hottest 2018 content for our rolling 2018 PCCP HOT Articles collection. Submit your work for consideration now.

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2017 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship: awarded to Professor Ryan P. Steele

Nominations were open to all and were made by leading researchers from around the world. The nominee list was shortlisted by the Editorial Board prior to the Fall 2017 PCCP Editorial Board meeting, at which, Professor Ryan P. Steele, University of Utah was selected as the 2017 recipient.

Professor Steele’s research focuses on in fundamental physical chemistry and problems in which unique electronic structure leads to interesting nuclear dynamics. He develops theoretical methods that efficiently interface accurate electronic structure theory with electronic and nuclear dynamics.

As part of the Lectureship, Professor Steele will be awarded a travel bursary of £1000 to attend and present at a leading international event in 2018, where he will be presented his Lectureship award. Professor Steele has also been invited to contribute a Perspective article to PCCP.

Many congratulations to Professor Steele on behalf of the PCCP Ownership Societies and Editorial Board.

Nominations for the 2018 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship will open next summer. Keep up to date with latest journal news on the blogTwitternewsletter and e-TOC alerts.

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Celebrating Women in Chemistry on the 150th Anniversary of Marie Curie’s Birthday

November 7, 2017 is the 150th anniversary of Marie Skłodowska-Curie‘s birthday. Curie’s life exemplified the challenges that women aspiring to creative and rewarding intellectual endeavours faced even in the Age of Enlightenment.  Today, we are fortunate to live in a time when college education and science careers are open to women (at least, in most countries). Yet, there are still many barriers, biases, and inequalities that women pursuing careers in science and technology face.  One pervasive problem is a perception of intellectual inferiority of women; examples include public remarks by former Harvard president Larry Summers and a recent manifesto of a Google engineer. What I find mind-boggling is that these beliefs survive despite overwhelming objective evidence of female excellence in STEM fields. However, the perception is reinforced by another phenomenon: under-appreciation and under-recognition of women’s contributions and achievements in STEM.

To mark the 150th birthday of Marie Curie, the Journal of Physical Chemistry has published a compilation of papers highlighting female physical chemists. The breadth of topics covered in these papers and the quality of science they present make a powerful statement.  The Editorial shares several facts about the history of female authorship, including the reference to Curie’s 1901 paper, which is believed to be the first paper by a female author published in the journal.

At PCCP we have an ongoing commitment to diversity, and proud history of publishing work from female authors and striving to ensure a balanced Editorial Board which is reflective of the field. Yet, of course more work towards achieving a level playing field will be done.

To celebrate Marie Curie’s birthday, we have collated a gallery of cover images of PCCP papers to highlight just some of the excellent contributions made to the journal by female scientists in the physical chemistry field. We hope you enjoy them.

Anna KrylovPCCP Editorial Board member

The articles include:

In search of metal hydrides: an X-ray absorption and emission study of [NiFe] hydrogenase model complexes
Serena DeBeer et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 10688. DOI: 10.1039/C5CP07293J

The role of alkali metal cations in the stabilization of guanine quadruplexes: why K+ is the best
Fonseca Guerra et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 20895. DOI: 10.1039/C6CP01030J

Phosphine passivated gold clusters: how charge transfer affects electronic structure and stability
Doreen Mollenhauer and Nicola Gaston
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 29686. DOI: 10.1039/C6CP04562F

Chirped-pulse Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy of ten vibrationally excited states of i-propyl cyanide: exploring the far-infrared region
Amanda L. Steber, Melanie Schnell et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 1751. DOI: 10.1039/C6CP06297K

Fingerprints of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in saligenin–water clusters revealed by mid- and far-infrared spectroscopy
Marie-Pierre Gaigeot, Edwin L. Sibert III, Anouk M. Rijs et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 20343. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP01951C

Dewetting acrylic polymer films with water/propylene carbonate/surfactant mixtures – implications for cultural heritage conservation
Debora Berti et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 23723. DOI: 10.1039/C7CP02608K

The effect of π-stacking, H-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine–adenine, thymine–thymine and adenine–thymine dimers
Krylov et al.
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 2292. DOI: 10.1039/B919930F

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From a PCCP Associate Editor’s Desk

Professor Ayyappanpillai Ajayghosh, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST)

Dr. Ayyappanpillai Ajayaghosh is the Director of the CSIR-National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (CSIR-NIIST), Thiruvananthapuram, India and is a Professor and former Dean of Chemical Sciences, Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR). His research contributions are in the interdisciplinary areas of organic photoresponsive materials, supramolecular chemistry, molecular self-assembly, organogels, molecular probes and sensors. He has developed a new class of functional soft materials namely pi-gels having potential applications in energy harvesting, sensing and security materials. His scientific contributions are recognized with the prestigious awards a few of these includes Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize for Chemical Sciences (2007), the Infosys Science Prize (2012), the Silver Medal of the Chemical Research Society of India (2013), the TWAS Prize for Chemistry (2013) and the J. C. Bose National Fellowship (2015). He is a fellow of the three major science academies of India and is a fellow of the World Academy of Sciences. He is an Associate Editor of PCCP and shares some of his thoughts & experiences.

 

Question: Could you share a short story on your most inspiring/satisfying research?

Answer: I believe my main contribution in science is the development of a new class of soft materials called π-gels made of self-assembled π-conjugated molecules. Most of these materials are fluorescent which a sensitive property is and hence these materials have potential applications in sensing, imaging and security. Our contributions in this area are well recognized nationally and internationally. It is very satisfying to note that the scientific community across the globe recognizes us.

 

Question: What, in your opinion has been the most exciting part of being an Associate Editor?

Answer: Associating with a journal from Royal Society of Chemistry is a prestige to any chemist, so is for me. The most exciting and interesting aspect, being an Associate Editor is the opportunity to read articles fresh before publishing. I enjoyed reading some of the best Physical Chemistry related work on soft materials. It is also exciting to see that many of the young researchers are impressed by the quality of PCCP and therefore submission to PCCP from India is going up.

 

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Chemical Bonding and Reactivity Spanning the Periodic Table: A Symposium in Honor of Roald Hoffmann

PCCP recently sponsored the symposium “Chemical Bonding and Reactivity Spanning the Periodic Table: A Symposium in Honor of Roald Hoffmann”, which was held at the 254th American Chemical Society meeting in Washington DC, August 20-24, 2017.

This symposium honored distinguished American Chemist and Nobel Prize winner, Prof. Hoffmann, who turned 80 years old this summer. Prof. Hoffmann has been influential in shaping the thinking of chemists working in a plethora of different fields – as evidenced by the talks given in the symposium by around 75 Hoffmann alumni, collaborators and friends, which showcased research in theoretical approaches to organic, organometallic, inorganic, biological and materials chemistry, as well as how matter responds to conditions of extreme external pressure.

Primarily experimental work was also featured in the symposium, and a historical lecture about Hoffmann’s role in the development of the “Woodward-Hoffmann” rules was given. Many of the speakers also highlighted Hoffmann’s role as a wonderful mentor, patient teacher and inspiring collaborator, as well as his artistic and humanistic endeavors.

PCCP was delighted to be involved with the meeting, and support our authors in discussing and advance their fields by participating at the symposium.

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Open for Nominations: 2017 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship

We are delighted to announce we are now welcoming nominations for the 2017 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship.

Lectureship details
Recognizing and supporting the significant contribution of early career researchers in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry, the lectureship is a platform for an early career physical chemist to showcase their research to the wider scientific community.

The recipient will receive £1000 to cover travel and accommodation costs to attend and present at a leading international meeting hosted by a PCCP Owner society. The recipient will also be invited to contribute a Perspective article to PCCP.

Launched with great success in 2016, last year’s winner, Dr David Glowacki, delivered the 2016 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship presentation at the Faraday Joint Interest Group Conference 2017.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates must:
•    Have completed their PhD 

•    Be actively pursuing an independent research career within physical chemistry, chemical physics or biophysical chemistry.
•    Be at an early stage of their independent career (typically this will be within 10 years of completing their PhD, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path.)

Selection criteria, nomination and judging process
•    Nominations must be made via email to pccp-rsc@rsc.org using the PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship nomination form and a letter of recommendation.
•    Individuals cannot nominate themselves for consideration.
•    Selection will be made by the PCCP Editorial Board at the 2017 PCCP Editorial Board meeting.
•    The winner will be selected based on their nomination, with due consideration given to the letter of recommendation, candidate biography, research achievements, previous PCCP publications and overall publication history.

Submit a nomination
To be considered for the 2017 lectureship, the following must be sent to the Editorial Office
•    A letter of recommendation
•    A complete nomination form

Submission deadline: 15th August 2017

Download nomination form

Submit nomination with letter of recommendation

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