Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Secrets shown in a good light

Scientists in France have created paper that can carry secret messages. In visible light, the paper is indistinguishable from regular paper and users can read, write or erase messages using three different wavelengths of UV light.

The functionalised paper, made by François-Xavier Felpin from the University of Nantes, and colleagues, contains coumarin molecules attached to the paper’s cellulose fibres. Exposing the paper to UV light with a wavelength of 340nm causes coumarin to react and create cyclobutane dimers. These dimers are invisible under visible light, but fluoresce under a UV lamp.

Graphical Abstract

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>

M. d’Halluin, J. Rull-Barrull, E. Le Grognec, D. Jacquemin and F.-X. Felpin
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 7672-7675
DOI: 10.1039/C6CC02915A
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In celebration of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was jointly awarded to  Tomas Lindahl, former director of Cancer Research UK’s Clare Hall Laboratories, Paul Modrich from Duke University in the US and Aziz Sancar from the University of North Carolina in the US  for their  “mechanistic studies of DNA repair”.

nobel laureates
Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar © Inserm-P. Latron, Mary Schwalm/AP/Press Association, Max Englund/UNC School of Medicine.

Tomas Lindahl’s research pieced together a molecular image of how base excision repairs DNA when a base of a nucleotide is damaged and subsequently managed to recreate the human repair process in vitro. The mechanism known as nucleotide excision repair, which excises damage from UV and carcinogenic substances, was then mapped by Aziz Sancar – the molecular details of this process changed the entire research field. Paul Modrich also studied the human version of the repair system. His work focused on DNA mismatch repair, a natural process which corrects mismatches that occur when DNA is copied during cell division.

The research carried out by the three 2015 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry has not only revolutionised our knowledge of how we function but also lead to the development of life – saving treatments. To celebrate these remarkable achievements, we are delighted to present a collection of recent Chemical Communications, Chemical Science and Chemical Society Reviews articles on DNA repair, FREE to read until 1 December 2015!

We invite you to submit your best research related to DNA repair mechanisms to Chemical Communications, Chemical Science and Chemical Society Reviews!


Reviews

Finding needles in a basestack: recognition of mismatched base pairs in DNA by small molecules
Anton Granzhan, Naoko Kotera and  Marie-Paule Teulade-Fichou
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 3630-3665
DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60455


The chemical biology of sirtuins
Bing Chen, Wenwen Zang, Juan Wang, Yajun Huang, Yanhua He,  Lingling Yan,  Jiajia Liu and Weiping Zheng
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2015, 44, 5246-5264
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS00373J


Luminescent oligonucleotide-based detection of enzymes involved with DNA repair
Chung-Hang Leung, Hai-Jing Zhong, Hong-Zhang He, Lihua Lu, Daniel Shiu-Hin Chan and Dik-Lung Ma
Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 3781-3795
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC51228B


 

 

Research articles

A label-free and sensitive fluorescent method for the detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase activity
Jing Tao, Panshu Song, Yusuke Sato, Seiichi Nishizawa, Norio Teramae, Aijun Tong  and Yu Xiang
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 929-932
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC06170E


DNA-mediated supercharged fluorescent protein/graphene oxide interaction for label-free fluorescence assay of base excision repair enzyme activity
Zhen Wang, Yong Li, Lijun Li, Daiqi Li, Yan Huang, Zhou Nie and Shouzhuo Yao
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 13373-13376
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC04759E


A fluorescent G-quadruplex probe for the assay of base excision repair enzyme activity
Chang Yeol Lee, Ki Soo Park and Hyun Gyu Park
Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 13744-13747
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC05010C


A chemical probe targets DNA 5-formylcytosine sites and inhibits TDG excision, polymerases bypass, and gene expression
Liang Xu, Ying-Chu Chen, Satoshi Nakajima, Jenny Chong, Lanfeng Wang,  Li Lan, Chao Zhang and  Dong Wang
Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 567-574
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC51849C


Sensitive detection of polynucleotide kinase using rolling circle amplification-induced chemiluminescence
Wei Tang, Guichi Zhu and Chun-yang Zhang
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 4733-4735
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC00256C


Rescuing DNA repair activity by rewiring the H-atom transfer pathway in the radical SAM enzyme, spore photoproduct lyase
Alhosna Benjdia, Korbinian Heil, Andreas Winkler, Thomas Carell and Ilme Schlichting
Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 14201-14204
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC05158K


Expanding DNAzyme functionality through enzyme cascades with applications in single nucleotide repair and tunable DNA-directedassembly of nanomaterials
Yu Xiang, Zidong Wang, Hang Xing and  Yi Lu
Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 398-404
DOI: 10.1039/C2SC20763J


Detection of base excision repair enzyme activity using a luminescent G-quadruplex selective switch-on probe
Ka-Ho Leung, Hong-Zhang He, Victor Pui-Yan Ma, Hai-Jing Zhong, Daniel Shiu-Hin Chan,  Jun Zhou,  Jean-Louis Mergny, Chung-Hang Leung and  Dik-Lung Ma
Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 5630-5632
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC41129J


Endonuclease IV discriminates mismatches next to the apurinic/apyrimidinic site in DNA strands: constructing DNA sensing platforms with extremely high selectivity
Xianjin Xiao, Yang Liu and  Meiping Zhao
Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 2819-2821
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC40902C


Also of interest: Find out more about the three Chemistry Nobel Laureates and their research.

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Radiolabels help evaluate emerging cancer treatment

Researchers in Spain have come up with a way to track the biodistribution of a boron cluster complex used to prepare boron-carrier drugs for a prospective cancer treatment called boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

Drugs based on the boron cluster complex COSAN (cobaltabisdicarbollide) exploit the over-expression of membrane receptors in cancer cells to deliver therapeutic levels of 10B across the membrane. Although 10B is a stable isotope, when a beam of low-energy neutrons is applied to the cell, 10B captures a neutron and subsequently decays, releasing a high-energy α-particle and destroying the cell.


Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in ChemComm – it’s free to access until 26th September:
COSAN as a molecular imaging platform: synthesis and “in vivo” imaging
Kiran B. Gona, Adnana Zaulet, Vanessa Gómez-Vallejo, Francesc Teixidor, Jordi Llop and Clara Viñas  
Chem. Commun., 2014, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C4CC05058D, Communication

 
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Themed Issue on Metal-Mediated Transformations of Small Molecules

We would like to celebrate our themed ChemComm collection Metal-Mediated Transformations of Small Molecules with our authors and community.

Guest editors Louise A. Berben and Jason B. Love introduce this web collection showcasing outstanding contributions in the field of the design, development, and exploitation of metal mediated transformations of small molecules. The themed collection includes contributions from molecular inorganic chemists, biological chemists, electrochemists, and theoreticians who are working toward understanding and developing productive transformations of small molecules: dinitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and dioxygen.

We invite you to submit your next communication article to ChemComm.

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International Symposia on Advancing the Chemical Sciences 7-10 August 2014

ISACS 14 Challenges in Organic Chemistry will bring together world leading experts in the field of organic chemistry and synthesis.

The best contribution will be awarded a fantastic prize from Chemistry World so don’t delay, be sure to submit your poster abstract by 2 June 2014.

Themes for the ISACS 14, Shanghai China are:

  • Organic and metal based catalysis
  • Total Synthesis
  • New Synthetic methodologies
  • Physical organic chemistry
  • Bioorganic and medicinal chemistry
  • For more information on how to submit your poster abstract please visit our conferences and events homepage.

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    A new class of photoswitchable linkers

    The synthesis and characterization of a new class of photochromic metal-organic framework (MOF) linkers is described in this communication. Dinesh Patel from Pennsylvania State University and collaborators from the Benedict Research Group at University of Buffalo demonstrate that additional functionality, such as photoswitching, can be designed into a ligand without affections the topology of MOFs.

    Compounds that change their molecular and electronic structure upon application of light are ideal candidates for sensors, switches and optical data storage medial. These photochromic molecules are now being pursued for use in MOFs in the hope of affording photonic control over the physical properties of the crystalline host. Several instances of MOFs containing non-covalently attached photochromic molecule have been reported, but there is a lack of control over guest orientation and concentration. The use of photoactive linkers means that the photochromic groups are covalently attached to the framework leading to MOFs with well-defined stoichiometry.  In this report, a new class of photoswitchable linkers, based on diarylethene photochromes is introduced.

    This article has been highlighted as a news story ‘metal organic frameworks react to light’ by Nina Notman in Materials Today

    To read more about the full synthesis and characterization, including crystal structure analysis of reaction intermediates, download the full article for free*

    Photoresponsive porous materials: the design and synthesis of photochromic diarlyethene-based linkers and a metal-organic framework

    Dinesh G. (Dan) Patel, Ian M. Walton, Jordan M. Cox, Cody J. Gleason, David R. Butzer and Jason B. Benedict
    DOI: 10.1039/C3CC49666J

    *Access is free untill the 19th May 2014 through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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    Small molecules stop cervical cancer virus assembling

    Pillarene image

    Proteins L1 and L2 form pentamers that arrange to form the viral particle © Shutterstock

    Researchers in China have disrupted the life cycle of the leading cause of cervical cancer – the human papilloma virus – using a macrocyclic molecule called a pillarene. The team hope their findings will offer new prophylactic avenues against the virus.There are over 100 different types of the human papilloma virus (HPV), 40 of which can be sexually transmitted. Most infections are symptomless and do not result in disease. However, a few types of the virus are known to cause changes in cells that can lead to cervical and throat cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 cause 70% of cervical cancer cases. 

    Vaccination programmes against types 16 and 18 have recently become available to teenage girls in some countries. However, as one of the lead scientists on the pillarene project Ying-Wei Yang at Jilin University, China, explains, there is an urgent need for alternatives: ‘the current HPV vaccines are type-specific, expensive and require cold chain transportation, so are not very helpful, especially in developing countries where most cervical cancers occur.’ 

     HPV is made up of two proteins, L1 and L2. These assemble into pentamers to form the virus particles that then attach to cells, resulting in infection. Some researchers believe that disrupting the assembly of the virus using molecules that bind to these two proteins might be the key to stopping it in its tracks.  

     CP5A, a carboxylatopillar[5]arene sodium salt, has a 3D, rigid and π-rich cavity that binds to amino acids 

     The pillarene derivative, CP5A, was tested as it is known to have high water solubility and show selective binding towards basic amino acids, like l-Lysine, l-arginine and l-histidine. Because of these properties, CP5A binds to the exposed basic amino acids in protein L1, preventing pentamer formation, and therefore stopping the creation of viral particles. 

     The team hope to screen other small molecules to find inhibitors for more specific binding sites on the interface between L1 and L2. Their long term aim is to use one of these to produce a HPV vaccine. 

     Margaret Stanley, a leading expert on the life cycle of human papilloma viruses at the University of Cambridge in the UK sees this study as valuable research for investigations on viral assembly. However, she cautions that the therapeutic value of these approaches is not clear. ‘Inhibiting viral assembly will significantly block transmission, but will not necessarily have any effect on infection level since viral genomes will still be present and potentially able to reactivate after the end of any treatment with inhibitors.’ 


     You can also read this article in Chemistry World» 

    Read the original journal article in ChemComm – it’s free to download until 28th March:
    Efficient inhibition of human papillomavirus 16 L1 pentamer formation by a carboxylatopillarene and a p-sulfonatocalixarene
    Dong-Dong Zheng, Ding-Yi Fu, Yuqing Wu, Yu-Long Sun, Li-Li Tan, Ting Zhou, Shi-Qi Ma, Xiao Zha and Ying-Wei Yang  
    Chem. Commun., 2014, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C3CC49789E

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    Hydrogen adopts alkali metal position

    Hydrogen stands in for a lithium in the cubane core of this alkali metal phenolate

    Now, Matthew Davidson and colleagues at the University of Bath in the UK have devised an organometallic synthetic strategy to make pseudocubane motifs of ammonium tris(phenol) ligands and lithium or sodium atoms, where one of the metals has been replaced by a hydrogen atom. The hydrogen forms the rarely reported trifurcated 4-centre hydrogen bond. Such an arrangement is not uncommon for the larger alkali metals, which can accommodate higher coordination numbers, but is not preferred by hydrogen.

    Davidson says their interest lies in gaining a better understanding of how ligands like  amine tris(phenolate) can be used to control reactive metal centres. A thorough comprehension of the coordination chemistry and the ability to draw conceptual similarities between the reactivity of hydrogen and metals as Lewis acids could help advance areas such as organocatalysis.


    Read the full article in Chemistry World»

    Read the original journal article in ChemComm:

    Unprecedented participation of a four-coordinate hydrogen atom in the cubane core of lithium and sodium phenolates
    David M. Cousins, Matthew G. Davidson and Daniel García-Vivó
    Chem. Commun., 2014, Advance Article
    DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47393G, Communication

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    Potato powered biomotors are cheap as chips

    Enzyme rich potato tissue can be used to cheaply and quickly mass produce bubble powered millimotors, new research shows.

    Scientists have been developing synthetic self-powered motors over the last ten years after being inspired by the molecular motors that are ubiquitous in nature. These motors, including those responsible for the movement of flagella and cilia, power movement on a micro-scale by utilising fuels present in their surrounding environment.

    Synthetic bubble propelled micromotors are traditionally built by coating one half of a tiny pellet with a metal catalyst or enzyme which, when placed in a solution of hydrogen peroxide, catalyses oxygen production to form streams of bubbles. This asymmetric production of bubbles, propels the pellet through the liquid.
     
    Potatoes are rich in catalase, an enzyme commonly used in bubble powered micromotors. This led Joseph Wang from the University of California, US, and his colleagues, back to nature to make bubble powered millimotors in a beautifully simple manner. One half of a 2 x 1 mm potato cylinder is capped with epoxy, to mimic the asymmetric design of traditional micromotors. The catalase in the exposed potato tissue catalyses bubble production and propels the potato pellet at speeds of up to 5.12 mm s-1.

    C3CC42782J

    Read the full article in Chemistry World»

    Read the original journal article in ChemComm:
    Self-propelled chemically-powered plant-tissue biomotors
    Yonge Gu, Sirilak Sattayasamitsathit, Kevin Kaufmann, Rafael Vazquez-Duhalt, Wei Gao, Chunming Wang and Joseph Wang  
    Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 7307-7309
    DOI: 10.1039/C3CC42782J

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