Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

4th Annual UK Porous Materials Conference

The Annual UK Porous Materials Conference (UKPorMat), now in its 4th year, was held at Cardiff University on the 1st and 2nd of July 2019. The meeting, organised and chaired by the committee members of the RSC Porous Materials Interest Group, aims to bring together researchers working in the expanding field of porous materials, which includes metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), porous organic cages, porous organic polymers, polymers of intrinsic microporosity and much more.

The Royal Society of Chemistry was delighted to be a part of the event, sponsoring a number of poster and talk prizes:

  • Giulia Schukraft (Imperial College London) was awarded the ChemComm Poster Prize
  • Iona Doig (University of Southampton) was awarded the Materials Horizons Poster Prize
  • Alexander Thom (University of Glasgow) was awarded the CrystEngComm Poster Prize
  • Alex James (University of Sheffield) was awarded the Chemical Science Prize for Best Talk

Congratulations to all of the prize winners!

 

Giulia Schukraft (left) receiving the ChemComm prize from Chris Harding (right)

Iona Doig (right) receiving the Materials Horizons prize from Chris Harding (left)

Alexander Thom (left) receiving the CrystEngComm prize from Ross Forgan (right) Alex James (left) receiving the Chemical Science prize from Chris Harding (right)

Special thanks to the organizers and committee members of the RSC Porous Materials Interest Group:

Dr Thomas Bennett (University of Cambridge)

Dr Andrea Laybourn (University of Nottingham)

Dr Ross Forgan (University of Glasgow)

Dr Darren Bradshaw (University of Southampton)

Dr Tim Easun (Cardiff University)

Dr Timothy Johnson (Johnson Matthey Technology Centre)

Professor Tina Düren

Prize-winners at the close of the 4th Annual UK Porous Materials meeting (Cardiff, 1st-2nd July 2019)

 

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ChemComm: Our Vision

Vision statement

“ChemComm is the Royal Society of Chemistry’s most cited journal, and has a long history of publishing exciting new findings of exceptional significance, across the breadth of chemistry.

With its Communication format, we recognise the importance of rapid disclosure of your work, and we are proud that our times to publication remain among the fastest in the field.

Our vision for ChemComm is to maintain our longstanding tradition of quality, trust and fairness, and we encourage you to join our community by publishing your most exciting research with us.”

Véronique Gouverneur, Editorial Board Chair

Scope

ChemComm is committed to publishing findings on new avenues of research, drawn from all major areas of chemical research, from across the world. Main research areas include (but are not limited to):

  • Analytical chemistry
  • Biomaterials chemistry
  • Bioorganic/medicinal chemistry
  • Catalysis
  • Chemical Biology
  • Coordination Chemistry
  • Crystal Engineering
  • Energy
  • Sustainable chemistry
  • Green chemistry
  • Inorganic chemistry
  • Inorganic materials
  • Main group chemistry
  • Nanoscience
  • Organic chemistry
  • Organic materials
  • Organometallics
  • Physical chemistry
  • Supramolecular chemistry
  • Synthetic methodology
  • Theoretical and computational chemistry

Learn more about ChemComm online! Submit your latest high impact research here!

Keep up-to-date with our latest journal news on Twitter @ChemCommun or via our blog!

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Targeting the Powerhouse of the Cell to Fight Cancer

Everyone knows that cancer as a disease is awful, but the side effects of currently utilized chemotherapies have their own horrors. Research into natural products as therapies have found some promising compounds, but they face barriers to practical use in patients. One particular molecule, artesunate (ART), recently showed high potential for anticancer activity when in the presence of iron. Unfortunately, ART has major problems that limit its current applicability, including low solubility in water and high instability in biologically relevant conditions.

One approach to get around these issues is to encapsulate the drug (pun intended) in a nanoparticle-based carrier. A carrier with a hydrophobic interior and hydrophilic exterior can bring higher concentrations of drugs with low solubility into a cell and protect them from deleterious conditions in the body. An additional benefit is the relative ease of incorporating targeting ligands into the particles during synthesis. This allows the drugs to only interact with specific cells or, in this specific case, the mitochondria within cells.

Figure 1. Schematic of the nanoparticle synthesis process complete with targeting ligand molecules. The anticancer agent is activated in the presence of iron.

Researchers in China have prepared approximately 200 nm nanoparticle carriers for ART (Figure 1) using triphenyl phosphonium (TPP) as a mitochondrial targeting ligand. These nanoparticles remained stable in biologically relevant conditions for a week, sufficient for in-vitro studies. The studies showed significant decreases in cancer cell growth when the nanoparticles were used compared to the ART alone. The nanoparticles with TPP on the surface showed the highest efficacy, particularly when coupled with iron treatment to activate the ART.

Figure 2. Images of cells exposed to nanoparticles with (bottom) and without (top) a targeting ligand filled with different fluorescent dyes. The increased brightness corresponds to higher uptake of the nanoparticles by the cells.

To further investigate the cell uptake pathway of the nanoparticles, the researchers added fluorescent dye molecules to the inside of the particles. Once the cells took up and ruptured the nanoparticles, the dyes were released and became visible to the researchers (Figure 2). The fluorescence was twice as great in cells exposed to the nanoparticles treated with the TPP targeting ligand, showing its value for cell uptake. The researchers also used fluorescent dyes that react with reactive oxygen species (ROSs), as their generation is how ART kills cancer cells. The in-vitro studies showed an over three-fold increase in fluorescence from reactions with ROSs which, combined with data showing higher rates of cell death, supports the increased activity of ART when combined with this nanoparticle architecture.

To find out more please read:

A mitochondria targeting artesunate prodrug-loaded nanoparticle exerting anticancer activity via iron-mediated generation of the reactive oxygen species

Zhigang Chen, Xiaoxu Kang, Yixin Wu, Haihua Xiao, Xuzi Cai, Shihou Seng, Xuefeng Wang and Shiguo Chen

Chem. Commun., 2019, 55, 4781 – 4784.

About the blogger:

 

Beth Mundy is a PhD candidate in chemistry in the Cossairt lab at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. Her research focuses on developing new and better ways to synthesize nanomaterials for energy applications. She is often spotted knitting in seminars or with her nose in a good book. You can find her on Twitter at @BethMundySci.

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HOT ChemComm articles for October

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 7th December 2018.

Essential but sparse collagen hydroxylysyl post-translational modifications detected by DNP NMR
Wing Ying Chow, Rui Li, Ieva Goldberga, David G. Reid, Rakesh Rajan, Jonathan Clark, Hartmut Oschkinat, Melinda J. Duer, Robert Hayward and Catherine M. Shanahan
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 12570-12573
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC04960B, Communication

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Rapid synthesis of Co3O4 nanosheet arrays on Ni foam by in situ electrochemical oxidization of air-plasma engraved Co(OH)2 for efficient oxygen evolution
Wenling Gu, Liuyong Hu, Xiaoqing Zhu, Changshuai Shang, Jing Li and Erkang Wang
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06399K, Communication

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Modification of amine-cured epoxy resins by boronic acids based on their reactivity with intrinsic diethanolamine units
Yumiko Ito, Jumpei Kida, Daisuke Aoki and Hideyuki Otsuka
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC07412G, Communication

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3-Homoacyl coumarin: an all carbon 1,3-dipole for enantioselective concerted (3+2) cycloaddition
Yi-Ru Chen, Madhusudhan Reddy Ganapuram, Kai-Hong Hsieh, Kai-Han Chen, Praneeth Karanam, Sandip Sambhaji Vagh, Yan-Cheng Liou and Wenwei Lin
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC07271J, Communication

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Coinage metal complexes of NHC-stabilized silyliumylidene ions
Philipp Frisch and Shigeyoshi Inoue
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC07754A, Communication

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An ultrafine ruthenium nanocrystal with extremely high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in both acidic and alkaline media
Yutong Li, Fuqiang Chu, Yang Liu, Yong Kong, Yongxin Tao, Yongxin Li and Yong Qin
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC08276F, Communication

 

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Copper A3 Coupling using a Switchable Homogeneous/Heterogeneous Catalyst

A MOC, I learned this week, is a metal-organic cage. I was familiar with MOMs, MOFs and MOBs, but MOCs were a new one. A MOM (metal-organic material) is a coordination-driven assembly constructed from metal nodes linked by organic ligands. MOMs encompass both MOFs (metal-organic frameworks) and MOCs (metal-organic cages). A MOF is an extended network with the potential for inner porosity, and a MOC is a discrete metal-ligand cluster. And that’s just about as far down the nomenclature rabbit hole I’m willing to go. If you’re keeping up you’ll realise that I forgot one! A MOB is a crowd of graduate students competing for free coffee at the public seminar.

Dong and co-workers at Shandong Normal University designed and prepared a MOM catalyst constructed from copper(II) nodes and a tripodal ligand consisting of a phenylic wheel functionalised with diketones. In chloroform these two components arrange into discrete MOC assemblies containing two tripodal ligands and three copper ions. The copper ions in the cluster are each coordinated to two diketone moieties (in a acetylacetonate-like fashion) in a quasi-square planar arrangement.

Synthesis of the tripodal ligand functionalised with diketone coordinating moieties.

Synthesis of the tripodal ligand functionalised with diketone coordinating moieties.

An interesting property of the material is that it can switch between the MOC form, soluble in halogenated solvents, and an insoluble MOF that assembles upon addition of 1,4-dioxane. 1,4-Dioxane is both an anti-solvent and a ligand; coordination between copper and 1,4-dioxane binds the discrete MOC cages to each other, arranging them into the extended MOF structure. This behaviour can be exploited to prepare a practical catalyst that combines the benefits of both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, namely that homogeneous catalysts are generally more efficient, selective and easier to study, but heterogeneous catalysis are easier to recover and recycle. What better way to solve this problem than with a catalyst that is homogeneous during the reaction conditions, but heterogeneous when it comes to product separation?

Reversible metal-organic cage MOC(top left)-MOF(top right) metal-organic framework transition mediated by the addition of 1,4-dioxane. Coordination bonds between 1,4-dioxane shown (bottom image).

Reversible MOC(top left)-MOF(top right) transition mediated by the addition of 1,4-dioxane. Coordination bonds between 1,4-dioxane shown (bottom image).

The authors used the A3 coupling reaction to demonstrate this concept in a catalytic reaction. The A3 reaction is a transition metal-catalysed, multi-component coupling reaction between aldehydes, alkynes and amines. The products are propargylamines, practical synthetic intermediates for the synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles. The A3 reaction has been extensively studied and can be effected by a wide range of transition metal catalysts. Its versatility makes it a popular choice as a model catalytic reaction to demonstrate innovative ideas in catalytic design – as the authors have done here.

Coordination-driven assemblies have a unique potential for the synthesis of differentially soluble materials, used by the authors for novel catalytic design. Whether this particular metal-ligand combination can be applied to other copper catalysed reactions remains to be seen, nevertheless the principle offers an innovative approach that augments the range of methods striving to bridge the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis.

To find out more please read:

Cu3L2 metal-organic cages for A3-coupling reactions: reversible coordination interaction triggered homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous recovery

Gong-Jun Chen, Chao-Qun Chen, Xue-Tian Li, Hui-Chao Ma and Yu-Bin Dong.
Chem. Commun., 2018, 54, 11550-11553
DOI: 10.1039/c8cc07208f

About the author

Zoë Hearne is a PhD candidate in chemistry at McGill University in Montréal, Canada, under the supervision of Professor Chao-Jun Li. She hails from Canberra, Australia, where she completed her undergraduate degree. Her current research focuses on transition metal catalysis to effect novel transformations, and out of the lab she is an enthusiastic chemistry tutor and science communicator.

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HOT ChemComm articles for September

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 4th November 2018.

Organocatalytic decarboxylative alkylation of N-hydroxy-phthalimide esters enabled by pyridine-boryl radicals
Liuzhou Gao, Guoqiang Wang, Jia Cao, Dandan Yuan, Cheng Xu, Xuewen Guo and Shuhua Li
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06152A, Communication

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A new C,N-cyclometalated osmium(II) arene anticancer scaffold with a handle for functionalization and antioxidative properties
Enrique Ortega, Jyoti G. Yellol, Matthias Rothemund, Francisco J. Ballester, Venancio Rodríguez, Gorakh Yellol, Christoph Janiak, Rainer Schobert and José Ruiz
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 11120-11123
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06427J, Communication

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Descriptors of magnetic anisotropy revisited
Mauro Perfetti and Jesper Bendix
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC05756G, Communication

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A semiconducting metal-chalcogenide–organic framework with square-planar tetra-coordinated sulfur
Huajun Yang, Min Luo, Zhou Wu, Wei Wang, Chaozhuang Xue and Tao Wu
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 11272-11275
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06997B, Communication

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Transition between tangential and co-axial liquid crystalline honeycombs in the self-assembly of Y-shaped bolapolyphiles
Anne Lehmann, Marko Prehm, Changlong Chen, Feng Liu, Xiangbing Zeng, Goran Ungar and Carsten Tschierske
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06281A, Communication

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Unraveling the isomeric heterogeneity of glycans: ion mobility separations in structures for lossless ion manipulations
Gabe Nagy, Isaac K. Attah, Sandilya V. B. Garimella, Keqi Tang, Yehia M. Ibrahim, Erin S. Baker and Richard D. Smith
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06966B, Communication

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ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship – nominations now open!

We are pleased to welcome nominations for the 2019 Emerging Investigator Lectureship for ChemComm.

All nominations must be received by Friday 25th January 2019.

ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship
• Recognises emerging scientists in the early stages of their independent academic career.
• Eligible nominees should have completed their PhD on or after the 15th September 2010.

Lectureship details
• The recipient of the lectureship will be invited to present a lecture at three different locations over a 12-month period, with at least one of these events taking place at an international conference.
• The recipient will receive a contribution of £1500 towards travel and accommodation costs for their lectures, as well as a certificate.
• The recipient will be asked to contribute a review article for the journal.

How to nominate
Self-nomination is not permitted. Nominators must send the following to the editorial team via 
chemcomm-rsc@rsc.org by Friday 25th January 2019.
• Recommendation letter, including the name, contact details and website URL of the nominee.
• A one-page CV for the nominee, including a summary of their education, dates of key career achievements, a list of up to five of their top independent publications, total numbers of publications and patents, and other indicators of esteem, together with evidence of career independence.
• A copy of the candidate’s best publication to date (as judged by the nominator).
• Two supporting letters of recommendation from two independent referees. These should not be someone from the same institution or the candidate’s post doc or PhD supervisor.

The nominator and independent referees should comment on the candidate’s presenting skills.

Incomplete nominations or those not adhering to the above requirements will not be considered, and nominees will not be contacted regarding any missing or incorrect documents.

Selection procedure
• The editorial team will screen each nomination for eligibility and draw up a shortlist of candidates based on the nomination documents provided.
• Shortlisted candidates will be asked to provide a brief supporting statement summarising their key achievements, highlighting the impact of their work and justifying why they deserve the specific lectureship for which they have been entered.
• The recipient of the lectureship will then be selected and endorsed by a selection panel composed of members of the ChemComm Editorial Board. The winner will be announced in the first half of 2019.

NB: Please note that members of the selection panel from the ChemComm Editorial Board are not eligible to nominate, or provide references, for this lectureship.

For any queries, please contact the editorial team at chemcomm-rsc@rsc.org.

 

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EuroBIC 14

This August saw the occasion of the 14th European Biological Inorganic Chemistry Conference (EuroBIC), held at the University of Birmingham in the UK. With an excellent line up of internationally renowned plenary and keynote speakers the event was a huge success, attracting around 400 attendees.

The Royal Society of Chemistry was pleased to support the event, offering poster prizes of books and book vouchers. The winners of RSC vouchers were:

  • Raul Berrocal-Martin (University of Glasgow) – Dalton Transactions Poster Prize
  • Wilma Neumann (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) – Metallomics Poster Prize
  • Ying Zhou (University of Hong Kong) – ChemComm Poster Prize
  • Leon Jenner (University of East Anglia) – Chemical Science Poster Prize

The following presenters also won the RSC Highly Commended Poster Awards:

  • Gloria Vigueras Bautista (University of Murcia)
  • Nicolai Burzlaff (Friedrich-Alexander University)
  • Samya Banerjee (University of Warwick)
  • Riccardo Bonsignore (Cardiff University)
  • Philip Ash (University of Oxford)

Dalton Transactions associate editor Nils Metzler-Nolte (Ruhr-Universität Bochum) and Chemical Science assistant editor William King were on hand to award the prizes.

Raul Berrocal-Martin (left) receiving the Dalton Transactions prize from Nils Metzler-Nolte (right) Ying Zhou (left) receiving the ChemComm prize from Nils Metzler-Nolte (right)
Leon Jenner (left) receiving the Chemical Science prize from William King (right) Gloria Vigueras Bautista (left) receiving a Highly Commended Poster Prize from William King (right)
Riccardo Bonsignore (left) receiving a Highly Commended Poster Prize from William King (right) Philip Ash (left) receiving a Highly Commended Poster Prize from William King (right)

The RSC offers a hearty congratulations to all poster prize winners!

Next year the 19th International Conference on Biological Inorganic Chemistry (ICBIC 19) will be held in Interlaken, Switzerland – August 11th to 16th. The next European Biological Inorganic Chemistry Conference (EuroBIC 15) will be held in Reykjavik, Iceland, in August 2020. 

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ChemComm and Chemical Science Poster Prize winners at the 28th International Symposium on the Organic Chemistry of Sulfur

The 28th International Symposium on the Organic Chemistry of Sulfur (ISOCS 28) was held in Tokyo, Japan, from 26th – 31st August.

Over 220 delegates attended the symposium which was chaired by Professor Kei Goto (Tokyo Institute of Technology). ISOCS symposia are prestigious international scientific events with a tradition of over 50 years that cover the whole fascinating range of sulfur chemistry from theory to practical applications. ISOCS-28 has offered a scientific program dealing with the latest developments in sulfur chemistry presented by leading international experts including six Plenary Lecturers and twenty Invited Lecturers. The next symposium, ISOCS-29, will be held in 2020 in Ontario, Canada, under the chairmanship of Professor Adrian L. Schwan (University of Guelph).

Mr Ryosuke Masuda from Tokyo Institute of Technology was awarded the ChemComm Poster Prize for his piece titled ‘Model Study of a GPx-derived Selenenic Acid with Thiols by Utilizing a Cradled Selenocysteine’.

Mr Tomohiro Sugahara from Kyoto University was award the Chemical Science Poster Prize for his piece titled ‘Chalcogenation Reactions of 1,2-Digermacyclobutadiene’.

Congratulations to both!

Mr. Tomohiro Sugahara was awarded the Chemical Science Poster Prize by Hiromitsu Urakami

Mr. Ryosuke Masuda was awarded the ChemComm Poster Prize by Hiromitsu Urakami

 

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HOT ChemComm articles for August

All of the referee-recommended articles below are free to access until 5th October 2018.

Induced circular dichroism of monoatomic anions: silica-assisted the transfer of chiral environment from molecular assembled nanohelices to halide ions
Yutaka Okazaki, Naoya Ryu, Thierry Buffeteau, Shaheen Pathan, Shoji Nagaoka, Emilie Pouget, Sylvain Nlate, Hirotaka Ihara and Reiko Oda
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC05449E, Communication

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Arsagermene, a compound with an –As[double bond, length as m-dash]Ge[double bond splayed right] double bond
Vladimir Ya. Lee, Manami Kawai, Olga A. Gapurenko, Vladimir I. Minkin, Heinz Gornitzka and Akira Sekiguchi
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC05630G, Communication

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Progress in selective oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes to olefins promoted by boron nitride catalysts
Lei Shi, Yang Wang, Bing Yan, Wei Song, Dan Shao and An-Hui Lu
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC04604B, Feature Article

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Photochemical and electrochemical hydrogen evolution reactivity of lanthanide-functionalized polyoxotungstates
Marzieh Arab Fashapoyeh, Masoud Mirzaei, Hossein Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Ashwene Rajagopal, Manuel Lechner, Rongji Liu and Carsten Streb
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06334F, Communication

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A tetravalent sialic acid-coated tetraphenylethene luminogen with aggregation-induced emission characteristics: design, synthesis and application for sialidase activity assay, high-throughput screening of sialidase inhibitors and diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis
Guang-jian Liu, Beihan Wang, Yuan Zhang, Guo-wen Xing, Xiaoli Yang and Shu Wang
Chem. Commun., 2018, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06300A, Communication

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A C–C bonded 5,6-fused bicyclic energetic molecule: exploring an advanced energetic compound with improved performance
Yongxing Tang, Chunlin He, Gregory H. Imler, Damon A. Parrish and Jean’ne M. Shreeve
Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC05987J, Communication

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