Archive for February, 2017

Outstanding Reviewers for Chemical Communications in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Chemical Communications in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Martin Albrecht, Universität Bern

Dr Guanghui An, Heilongjiang University

Professor Rahul Banerjee, National Chemical Laboratory

Dr Justin Chalker, Flinders University

Dr Takashi Hirose, Kyoto University

Dr Astrid Müller, Caltech

Dr David Nelson, University of Strathclyde

Dr Kyungsoo Oh, Chung-Ang University

Dr Zhenlei Song, SiChuan University

Dr Xuehai Yan, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces

We would also like to thank the Chemical Communications board and the General Chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Molecular structure is teixobactin’s pièce de résistance

Study builds scientists’ arsenal against drug-resistant superbugs

Scientists in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands have gained a crucial understanding of the structure–activity relationship of new antibiotic, teixobactin. Since reports of its discovery in early 2015, researchers have shown it can kill a number of pathogens without them developing resistance to it.

The University of Lincoln’s Ishwar Singh explains that there are several reasons for teixobactin’s potency: ‘It uses multiple modes of action to kill resistant bacteria, this makes it very attractive since, if it worked by only one mode, bacteria could modify more easily. It is much more challenging for bacteria to mutate on multiple levels.’ Teixobactin also targets lipids in the bacteria’s cell walls, which are considered to be less able to mutate and develop resistance.

Read the full story by Hannah Dunckley on Chemistry World.

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry
Structure of teixobactin and with the D-amino acids highlighted in red

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