Archive for September, 2016

Top 10 Reviewers for ChemComm

In celebration of Peer Review Week, with the theme of Recognition for Review, we would like to highlight the top 10 reviewers for ChemComm in 2016, as selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal.

Top 10 Reviewers for ChemComm:
– Dr Xuehai Yan – Max-Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Germany
– Dr Yong Wang – Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center, USA
– Dr Cheng Wang – Xiamen University, China
– Dr Tieru Zhang – Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, China
– Dr Jie Wu – National University of Singapore, Singapore
– Dr Guocan Yu – Zhejiang University, China
– Dr Xiangbing Qi – National Institute of Biological Science Beijing, China
– Dr Yong Li – University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA
– Dr Youjun Yang – East China University of Science and Technology, China
– Professor Martin Albrecht – University of Bern, Switzerland

We would like to say a massive thank you to these reviewers as well as the ChemComm board and all of the chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

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3D graphene adds dimension to deaf–mute communication

Graphical AbstractScientists in China have printed conductive 3D graphene structures and applied them in a wearable electronic device that can translate common sign language gestures into written text. Given the simplicity underpinning its manufacture, during which graphene ink is extruded from a syringe, this material could inject some pace into the printed electronics field.

Wearable and bio-integrated devices are mainstays in medical technology, ranging from adhesive patches that measure heart and respiratory rate to brain–computer interfaces that induce neural activity. Its remarkable mechanical and electrical properties cast graphene, a 2D honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms, as a key future player in the wearable technology arena. However, it is a challenge to preserve the advantages of graphene’s sheet-like nanostructure in a 3D material that – unlike typical 2D materials – can relay information about forces from every angle.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Three-dimensional multi-recognition flexible wearable sensor via graphene aerogel printing
Boxing An, Ying Ma, Wenbo Li, Meng Su, Fengyu Li and Yanlin Song
Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 10948-10951
DOI: 10.1039/C6CC05910D, Communication

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