Sunset for perovskites?

Hugh Cowley writes about a hot Chemical Science article for Chemistry World

Perovskites have arguably transformed solar energy more in the last few years than other technologies have in decades. But British researchers have called into question optimistic predictions of undiscovered perovskites.

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Hybrid perovskites are a mix of organic and inorganic ions with the same crystal structure as calcium titanium oxide (CaTiO3). Halide perovskites are a subset of these structures containing halide ions such as fluoride or chloride. Iodide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) can convert sunlight to electricity.

Researchers use a decades-old geometric ‘tolerance factor’ to propose new combinations of ions that will form stable perovskites. Now, Robert Palgrave and his team at University College London, UK, have reassessed the validity of the tolerance factor in predicting new hybrid perovskite structures. Read the full article in Chemistry World»


Read the original journal article in Chemical Science – it’s open access:
On the application of the tolerance factor to inorganic and hybrid halide perovskites: a revised system
W. Travis, E. N. K. Glover, H. Bronstein, D. O. Scanlon and R. G. Palgrave 
Chem. Sci., 2016, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C5SC04845A, Edge Article

 
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