Archive for March, 2015

IRIS-14 Conference

Are you ready for the 14th International Symposium on Inorganic Ring Systems (IRIS-14) conference? This exciting conference will be held from the 26th to the 31st of July at the University of Regensburg, Germany.

Dalton Transactions and ChemComm proudly sponsor this symposium, which supports and reinforces the position of research groups worldwide within the large field of main group chemistry. The topics of the symposium cover all modern aspects of main group chemistry in a wide range of disciplines from material sciences to pure academic aspects of research.

Additionally, Manfreed Scheer, Associate Editor of ChemComm, will be organising this fantastic conference. He is Professor (Chair) of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Regensburg (Bavaria, Germany).

His research interests include the synthesis and investigation of reactivity patterns of unsubstituted main group element ligands with the focus on the heavier group 15 elements as well as the stabilisation and reactivity of main group compounds consisting of combinations of different elements. The chemistry of highly reactive molecules like P4, As4 or compounds containing transition metal group 15 element multiple bonds is of further interest.

Read some of Manfred’s latest articles in ChemComm:

Organometallic polyphosphorus and -arsenic ligands as linkers between pre-assembled linear CuI fragments
Martin Fleischmann, Luis Dütsch, Mehdi Elsayed Moussa, Andrea Schindler, Gábor Balázs, Christophe Lescop and Manfred Scheer
Chem. Commun.
, 2015,51, 2893-2895
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC09845E, Communication

Stoichiometry-controlled FeP nanoparticles synthesized from a single source precursor
Cornelia Hunger, Wilfried-Solo Ojo, Susanne Bauer, Shu Xu, Manfred Zabel, Bruno Chaudret, Lise-Marie Lacroix, Manfred Scheer, Céline Nayral and Fabien Delpech
Chem. Commun.
, 2013,49, 11788-11790
DOI:
10.1039/C3CC46863A, Communication

P–P bond formation via reductive dimerization of [Cp*Fe(η5-P5)] by divalent samarocenes
Tianshu Li, Michael T. Gamer, Manfred Scheer, Sergey N. Konchenko and Peter W. Roesk
Chem. Commun.
, 2013,49, 2183-2185
DOI:
10.1039/C3CC38841G, Communication

Submit your next top-notch, high impact Communication to

Manfreed Scheer’s Editorial Office

ChemComm is the home of urgent high quality communications from across the chemical sciences. With a world-renowned reputation for quality and fast times to publication (average of 40 days), ChemComm is the ideal place to publish your research.

Dr Heather Montgomery, Deputy Editor of the journal, will be also attending this conference and she hopes to meet many ChemComm and Dalton Transaction readers and authors there. Please do let her know if you will be there.

We look forward to seeing you in Regensburg!


Stay up to date with ChemComm: Be among the first to hear about the newest articles being published – Sign-up to our journal news alert to receive information about most read articles, themed issues, journal news, as well as calls for papers and invitations.

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2015 ChemComm Emerging Investigators Issue – now published

We are delighted to announce the publication of the 2015 ChemComm Emerging Investigators issue.

Now on its fifth year, we continue to be overwhelmed by the community’s positive response to this issue, which showcases up-and-coming scientists who are internationally recognised for making outstanding contributions to their respective fields.

The special issue includes a selection of Feature Articles and Communications, as well as a Profile of this year’s contributors, with cool photos to spotlight our authors at work or at play – look out for the famed Faraday Loving Cup, some serious curling, the Great Wall of China, and once again, as last year, a pumpkin is involved!  You can also take a look at our previous Emerging Investigator issues in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

And in case you’re interested to know why spiders are on the issue’s front cover, you can read the backstory.

View the whole Emerging Investigators 2015 collection today.

We invite you to submit your next communication article to ChemComm.

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Enzyme selectivity switch to benefit infant formula production

Baby drinking milk from a bottle

Scientists in Austria who have redesigned the active site of an enzyme to switch its regioselectivity may have latched onto a new way to make molecules that are important for infant formula. The engineered enzyme is almost identical to the original, it just catalyses a slightly different reaction to its twin.

Sialylated human milk oligosaccharides play an important role in infant health and development. They occur naturally in breast milk, but synthetic sialylated oligosaccharides are also in demand to enrich infant formula and other nutraceutical products.


Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in ChemComm – it’s free to access until 27th April:
Complete switch from α-2,3- to α-2,6-regioselectivity in Pasteurella dagmatis β-D-galactoside sialyltransferase by active-site redesign
Katharina Schmölzer, Tibor Czabany, Christiane Luley-Goedl, Tea Pavkov-Keller, Doris Ribitsch, Helmut Schwab, Karl Gruber, Hansjörg Weber and Bernd Nidetzky  
Chem. Commun., 2015,51, 3083-3086
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC09772F, Communication

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Group 12 members unite in unusual bonding situation

Chemists in the UK have created the unique trimetallic complex {(Ar’NacNac)Zn}2Hg. At the molecule’s heart lies a Zn–Hg–Zn unit – the first example of a bond between two different group 12 metals. What’s more, this metal chain is also the first example of catenation between group 12 elements other than just mercury. And if that wasn’t quirky enough for you, it is also a rare instance of zinc in the +1 oxidation state.

To make the compound, Philip Mountford, from the University of Oxford, and colleagues reduced (Ar’NacNac)ZnI with a potassium–mercury amalgam. The team is now exploring the chemistry of {(Ar’NacNac)Zn}2Hg and its intermetallic homologues.


Read this article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in ChemComm:
Synthesis, molecular and electronic structure, and reactions of a Zn–Hg–Zn bonded complex
Matthew P. Blake, Nikolas Kaltsoyannis and Philip Mountford  
Chem. Commun., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CC00637F, Communication

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Opening the door to poly(ionic liquid)s with enhanced properties

Poly(ionic liquid)s, or PILs, are polyelectrolytes whose potential uses are being investigated for a variety of technologies, such as batteries, membranes, solar cells and switchable surfaces. In this ChemComm communication, Professor Eric Drockenmuller and co-workers at the Université de Lyon, University of Liège and the Institut Universitaire de France describe a new family of PILs based on poly(vinyl ester 1,2,3-triazolium)s, which should give rise to new properties and application possibilities. 

The materials are prepared from a multistep route making use of `click chemistry´(copper(I) catalysed azide alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition reaction), palladium catalyzed vinyl group exchange, and cobalt mediated radical polymerisation. This route yields a neutral polymer, which is transformed into the poly(ionic liquid) using N-methyl bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide. This useful reagent alkylates the triazole group present, and delivers the bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide counterion in one step. 

Synthetic route used to yield new poly(vinyl-ester 1,2,3-triazolium)s

The ionic conductivity for the PIL reported is slightly lower than for other types of PIL. To tune this property, a variety of alkynes and azides are being tested in the ring forming step of the reaction, which will result in different substituents on the triazolium ring and on the spacer group between the polymer backbone and triazolium ring.  Changes in thermal properties in the the neutral precursor-to-PIL stage of the reaction were measured using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Significant changes in solubility, and a 9⁰C rise in glass transition temperature to -16⁰C, were observed. 

The molecular variety introduced by this new synthetic approach offers large scope for fine tuning the electronic and mechanical material properties of these polyelectrolytes, further enabling their use in important technological applications. 

Read this Chemical Communication today – it’s free to access until 3rd April*: 

Poly(vinyl ester 1,2,3-triazolium)s: a new member of the poly(ionic liquid)s family
M. M. Obadia, G. Colliat-Dangus, A. Debuigne, A. Serghei, C. Detrembleurb and E. Drockenmuller
DOI: 10.1039/c4cc08847f 

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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Top 25 most downloaded ChemComm articles from October–December 2014

ChemComm Issue 76, 2014 front coverRead on to find out which ChemComm articles your colleagues were downloading between October and December 2014!

Synthesis CdSexS1−x core/shell type quantum dotsvia one injection method
Liang-Yih Chen, Ching-Hsiang Chen, Chih-Hsiang Tseng, Feng-Lu Lai and Bing-Joe Hwang  
DOI: 10.1039/C0CC04074F

Graphene/graphite sheet assisted growth of high-areal-density horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes
Huanhuan Xie, Rufan Zhang, Yingying Zhang, Wenlin Zhang, Muqiang Jian, Chunya Wang, Qi Wang and Fei Wei  
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC04434G 

Solution-processable n-type and ambipolar semiconductors based on a fused cyclopentadithiophenebis(dicyanovinylene) core
Xueliang Shia,  Jingjing Changa and Chunyan Chia  
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC43680B

Diastereomeric ratio determination by high sensitivity band-selective pure shift NMR spectroscopy
Ralph W. Adams, Liam Byrne, Péter Király, Mohammadali Foroozandeh, Liladhar Paudel, Mathias Nilsson, Jonathan Clayden and Gareth A. Morris  
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC49659G
Open Access

NMR methodology for complex mixture ‘separation’
Nicholle G. A. Bell, Lorna Murray, Margaret C. Graham and Dušan Uhrín
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC48907H
Open Access

Streptavidin binding as a model to characterize thiol–ene chemistry-based polyamine surfaces for reversible photonic protein biosensing
Eva Melnik, Paul Muellner, Ole Bethge, Emmerich Bertagnolli, Rainer Hainberger and Michael Laemmerhofer  
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC48640K
Open Access

A new approach to improve cycle performance of rechargeable lithium–sulfur batteries by inserting a free-standing MWCNT interlayer
Yu-Sheng Su and Arumugam Manthiram  
DOI: 10.1039/C2CC33945E

Electrically-driven modulation of surface-grafted RGD peptides for manipulation of cell adhesion
Minhaj Lashkor, Frankie J. Rawson, Alex Stephenson-Brown, Jon A. Preece and Paula M. Mendes  
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC06649A
Open Access

Efficient photovoltaic and electroluminescent perovskite devices
Lidón Gil-Escrig, Giulia Longo, Antonio Pertegás, Cristina Roldán-Carmona, A. Soriano, Michele Sessolo and Henk J. Bolink  
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07518H

Phthalocyanines: a new class of G-quadruplex-ligands with many potential applications
Hidenobu Yaku, Takeshi Fujimoto, Takashi Murashima, Daisuke Miyoshi and Naoki Sugimoto  
DOI: 10.1039/C2CC31037F

Graphene quantum dots: emergent nanolights for bioimaging, sensors, catalysis and photovoltaic devices
Jianhua Shen, Yihua Zhu, Xiaoling Yang and Chunzhong Li  
DOI: 10.1039/C2CC00110A

Nanostructured electrochromic smart windows: traditional materials and NIR-selective plasmonic nanocrystals
Evan L. Runnerstrom, Anna Llordés, Sebastien D. Lounis and Delia J. Milliron  
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03109A
Open Access

Rh(III)-catalyzed oxidative C–H bond arylation with hydroquinones: sustainable synthesis of dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-ones and benzo[d]naphtho[1,2-b]pyran-6-ones
Wei Yang, Shan Wang, Qian Zhang, Qun Liu and Xianxiu Xu  
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08260E

A zirconium squarate metal–organic framework with modulator-dependent molecular sieving properties
Bart Bueken, Helge Reinsch, Nele Reimer, Ivo Stassen, Frederik Vermoortele, Rob Ameloot, Norbert Stock, Christine E. A. Kirschhock and Dirk De Vos  
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC03764B
Open Access

Aggregation-induced emission: phenomenon, mechanism and applications
Yuning Hong, Jacky W. Y. Lam and Ben Zhong Tang   
DOI: 10.1039/B904665H

Energy level tuning of TPB-based hole-transporting materials for highly efficient perovskite solar cells
Yakun Song, Songtao Lv, Xicheng Liu, Xianggao Li, Shirong Wang, Huiyun Wei, Dongmei Li, Yin Xiao and Qingbo Meng    
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC06493C

Ni-Catalyzed α-arylation of esters and amides with phenol derivatives
Eva Koch, Ryosuke Takise, Armido Studer, Junichiro Yamaguchi and Kenichiro Itami
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC08426H
Open Access

Bifunctional covalent organic frameworks with two dimensional organocatalytic micropores
Digambar Balaji Shinde, Sharath Kandambeth, Pradip Pachfule, Raya Rahul Kumar and Rahul Banerjee  
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC07104B

Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene composite structures for energy and catalytic applications
Won Jun Lee, Uday Narayan Maiti, Ju Min Lee, Joonwon Lim, Tae Hee Han and Sang Ouk Kim 
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC00146J

Bay-linked perylene bisimides as promising non-fullerene acceptors for organic solar cells
Wei Jiang, Long Ye, Xiangguang Li, Chengyi Xiao, Fang Tan, Wenchao Zhao, Jianhui Hou and Zhaohui Wang
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47204C

Selective oxidation of CO in the presence of H2, H2O and CO2via gold for use in fuel cells
Philip Landon, Jonathan Ferguson, Benjamin E. Solsona, Tomas Garcia, Albert F. Carley, Andrew A. Herzing, Christopher J. Kiely, Stanislaw E. Golunski and Graham J. Hutchings
DOI: 10.1039/B505295P

A porous metal–organic framework with –COOH groups for highly efficient pollutant removal
Qi Zhang, Jiancan Yu, Jianfeng Cai, Ruijing Song, Yuanjing Cui, Yu Yang, Banglin Chen and Guodong Qian
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC06648K

Wet chemical synthesis of silver nanorods and nanowires of controllable aspect ratio
Nikhil R. Jana, Latha Gearheart and Catherine J. Murphy  
DOI: 10.1039/B100521I

Reduction of graphene oxide viaL-ascorbic acid
Jiali Zhang, Haijun Yang, Guangxia Shen, Ping Cheng, Jingyan Zhang and Shouwu Guo  
DOI: 10.1039/B917705A

14.8% perovskite solar cells employing carbazole derivatives as hole transporting materials
Sang Do Sung, Min Soo Kang, In Taek Choi, Hong Mo Kim, Hyoungjin Kim, MunPyo Hong, Hwan Kyu Kim and Wan In Lee
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC06716A


ChemComm is the home of urgent high quality communications from across the chemical sciences. With a world renowned reputation for quality and fast times to publication (average of 40 days), ChemComm is the ideal place to publish your research.

Submit your urgent research to ChemComm today!

Stay up to date with ChemComm
Be among the first to hear about the newest articles being published – Sign-up to our journal news alert to receive information about most read articles, themed issues, journal news, as well as calls for papers and invitations.

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Spicing up MOFs

Curcumin is top of the ingredients list for a highly porous metal–organic framework (MOF) being developed by scientists in China that demonstrates a unique co-release drug delivery system.

MOFs have shown huge potential as drug carriers thanks to their large voids capable of encapsulating a wide variety of guest molecules. However, they are typically built from expensive, petrochemical-derived organic linkers, which, unfortunately, are not biocompatible. To overcome this, a team led by Guangshan Zhu, of Jilin University, has constructed a MOF exclusively from biologically friendly zinc ions and bioactive curcumin – the yellow pigment in the popular Indian spice turmeric, known for its potent anti-cancer properties.


Read the full article in Chemistry World»

Read the original journal article in ChemComm – it’s free to access until 13th April:
A highly porous medical metal–organic framework constructed from bioactive curcumin
Hongmin Su, Fuxing Sun, Jiangtao Jia, Hongming He, Aifei Wang and Guangshan Zhu  
Chem. Commun., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC10159F, Communication

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