Archive for July, 2012

Highlights from themed issues on ionic liquids

Ionic liquids ChemComm web themed issueCrystal engineering with ionic liquids CrystEngComm CollectionInterfaces of ionic liquids PCCP Themed issue

The field of ionic liquids has seen phenomenal growth in recent years, with the topic spanning a variety of disciplines across the chemical sciences. The recent themed issues from ChemComm, PCCP and CrystEngComm showcase some of the latest developments from a range of scientific subjects utilising the unique properties of ionic liquids.

Highlights from these themed issues include the articles below, which are free to download until the 24th August. You can also access the full themed issues by clicking on the buttons above.

CrystEngComm journal cover imageIonic liquids as crystallisation media for inorganic materials Ejaz Ahmed, Joachim Breternitz, Matthias Friedrich Groh and Michael Ruck, CrystEngComm, 2012, 14, 4874-4885

Ionic liquids in confined geometries Susan Perkin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 5052-5062

Fluorescence monitoring of ionic liquid-facilitated biopolymer mobilization and reorganization Luke M. Haverhals, Laura M. Nevin, Matthew P. Foley, E. Kathryn Brown, Hugh C. De Long and Paul C. Trulove, Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 6417-6419

Hofmeister effects of ionic liquids in protein crystallization: Direct and water-mediated interactions Magdalena Kowacz, Abhik Mukhopadhyay, Ana Luísa Carvalho, José M. S. S. Esperança, Maria J. Romão and Luís Paulo N. Rebelo, CrystEngComm, 2012, 14, 4912-4921

Influence of the ionic liquid/gas surface on ionic liquid chemistry Kevin R. J. Lovelock, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 5071-5089

ChemComm cover imageOptically responsive switchable ionic liquid for internally-referenced fluorescence monitoring and visual determination of carbon dioxide Shubha Pandey, Sheila N. Baker, Siddharth Pandey and Gary A. Baker, Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 7043-7045

Supramolecular architectures of symmetrical dicationic ionic liquid based systems Haregewine Tadesse, Alexander J. Blake, Neil R. Champness, John E. Warren, Pierre J. Rizkallah and Peter Licence, CrystEngComm, 2012, 14, 4886-4893

New insights into the interface between a single-crystalline metal electrode and an extremely pure ionic liquid: slow interfacial processes and the influence of temperature on interfacial dynamics Marcel Drüschler, Natalia Borisenko, Jens Wallauer, Christian Winter, Benedikt Huber, Frank Endres and Bernhard Roling, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 5090-5099

An elegant access to formation and vaporization enthalpies of ionic liquids by indirect DSC experiment and “in silico” calculations Sergey P. Verevkin, Dzmitry H. Zaitsau, Vladimir N. Emel’yanenko, Christoph Schick, Saivenkataraman Jayaraman and Edward J. Maginn, Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 6915-6917

PCCP journal cover imageIonic liquid-mediated epitaxy of high-quality C60 crystallites in a vacuum Yoko Takeyama, Shingo Maruyama, Hiroki Taniguchi, Mitsuru Itoh, Keiji Ueno and Yuji Matsumoto, CrystEngComm, 2012, 14, 4939-4945

Proton transfer and polarity changes in ionic liquid–water mixtures: a perspective on hydrogen bonds from ab initio molecular dynamics at the example of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate–water mixtures—Part 1 Martin Brehm, Henry Weber, Alfonso S. Pensado, Annegret Stark and Barbara Kirchner, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 5030-5044

Direct visualization of solution morphology of cellulose in ionic liquids by conventional TEM at room temperature Nan Luo, Yuxia Lv, Dexiu Wang, Jinming Zhang, Jin Wu, Jiasong He and Jun Zhang, Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 6283-6285

If you’re interested in ionic liquids, why not take a look at the recent cross-journal promotion Incredible ionic liquids: an article collection.

You can keep up to date with all the latest developments across the chemical sciences by signing up to your favourite journal e-alerts or following them on twitter!

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Luminogenic materials have a bright future

Luminogenic materials are a hot topic of research due to their potential applications in biotechnology and memory systems. But most luminogenic materials undergo aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) in the solid state. This is when the dye molecules near each other aggregate and form species that weaken the material’s emission.

Ben Zhong Tang and his team have been researching materials that instead exhibit aggregation-induced emission (AIE). This makes the preparation of solid state luminogens much simpler as aggregation increases the activity. Unfortunately, there are few AIE-active emitters in the longer wavelength region, which is of interest for biotechnology applications.

Tang’s team have addressed this oversight by developing a novel luminogen which couples the AIE property of tetraphenylethene and the longer wavelength activity of a hemicyanine dye. The emission properties of the resultant crystals can be readily tuned by the solvent molecules in the solution they are grown from.

Crystochromism of the novel luminogen

Most interestingly, the prepared luminogen shows crystochromism: a strong yellow emission in its thermodynamically stable crystalline form and a red colour in its metastable amorphous form. These changes are fully reversible, with grinding, heating or fuming causing the change in the luminogen’s crystallinity.

To find out more, download the ChemComm article today.

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pHantastic developments in lysosomal storage disease research

Lysosomes are cellular organelles that contain enzymes which break down cellular waste, a bit like stomachs. They have an internal pH of 4.8 and maintain this acidic pH (compared to the cytosol, pH 7.2) by pumping protons across the membrane. Changes in lysosomal pH can indicate the onset of disease.  In fact, elevated lysosomal pH has been noted in several lysosomal storage diseases. This group of around 50 rare, inherited, metabolic disorders result in symptoms such as seizures, deafness and/or blindness.

Now David Parker and colleagues at the University of Durham have designed responsive, low molecular weight probes which can permeate the target organelle and report the pH using a ratiometric signal. The probes could help evaluate the impact of drugs created to treat lysosomal storage diseases.

The team made europium and terbium complexes of two structurally related ligands that contain a sulfonamide moiety which acts like a switch, reversibly binding to the lanthanide and changing the metal coordination environment. The change is signalled by variation of emission spectral form and relative intensity and also modulates the circular polarisation of luminescence as the local helicity at the metal centre switches.  

Testing in a range of cell lines and altering the pH of the cellular and intracellular environment, the researchers developed an emission intensity ratio method using lanthanide luminescence which can be used to assess lysosomal pH variation for the first time.

Find out more by reading their ChemComm communication, free to download for a limited period.

Also of interest:
Times have changed since David Parker wrote his first ChemComm on a typewriter. He discusses his research path, chemical prostitution and targeted devastation in his ChemComm interview.

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Yong-Qiang Tu joins the ChemComm Editorial Board

Yong-Qiang TuOn behalf of the ChemComm Editorial Board, I am delighted to welcome Professor Yong-Qiang Tu as the new ChemComm Associate Editor for organic chemistry.

Professor Tu is a council member of Chinese Chemistry Society and the president of Gansu Chemistry Society. His current research interests centre on tandem rearrangement reactions and their application to the total syntheses of bioactive alkaloids, synthetic studies of biologically active natural products, and the construction of C-C and C-N bonds via C-H functionalisations.

Professor Tu’s editorial office is now open for submissions, welcoming urgent communications highlighting the latest advances in organic chemistry.

Find out more about Professor Tu’s research by reading these exciting articles:

Total synthesis of (±)-maistemonine and (±)-stemonamide
Zhi-Hua Chen, Yong-Qiang Zhang, Zhi-Min Chen, Yong-Qiang Tu and Fu-Min Zhang
Chem. Commun., 2011,47, 1836-1838, DOI: 10.1039/C0CC02612C, Communication

Enantioselective bromination/semipinacol rearrangement for the synthesis of β-bromoketones containing an all-α-carbon quaternary center
Hui Li ,  Fu-Min Zhang ,  Yong-Qiang Tu ,  Qing-Wei Zhang ,  Zhi-Min Chen ,  Zhi-Hua Chen and Jian Li
Chem. Sci., 2011,2, 1839-1841, DOI: 10.1039/C1SC00295C

Are you an organic chemist based in North America? Submit your research to Michael Krische, ChemComm North American Associate Editor for organic chemistry.

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Quick and clean way to make intermediates for dyes and pharmaceuticals

Scientists in China have developed a quick and clean way to reduce nitroarenes to aminoarenes, which are common intermediates for making dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals and agricultural chemicals.

Sodium borohydride and molecular hydrogen are commonly used for this reaction but their hydrogen elements cannot reduce nitroarenes under mild reaction conditions. Usually, expensive noble-metal catalysts are necessary to activate the hydrogen elements in the reductants.

Here, the researchers have used a vanadium-doped porous TiO2 with highly active hydrogen, which can instantly (<10s) and selectively reduce nitroarenes to aminoarenes under ambient conditions without catalysts. After being consumed by nitroarenes, the active hydrogen species can be regenerated by irradiating the V-doped TiO2 with UV light.

Link to journal article
Porous vanadium-doped titania with active hydrogen: a renewable reductant for chemoselective hydrogenation of nitroarenes at ambient condition
J Su et al
Chem. Commun., 2012, DOI: 10.1039/c2cc33969b

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Top ten most accessed articles in June

This month sees the following articles in ChemComm that are in the top ten most accessed:-

Selective total encapsulation of the sulfate anion by neutral nano-jars
Isurika R. Fernando, Stuart A. Surmann, Alexander A. Urech, Alexander M. Poulsen and Gellert Mezei
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 6860-6862, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC32074F, Communication

A highly sensitive “switch-on” fluorescent probe for protein quantification and visualization based on aggregation-induced emission
Fangfang Wang, Jiying Wen, Lingyun Huang, Jinjiu Huang and Jin Ouyang
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 7395-7397, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC33172A, Communication

Enhancing the Stokes’ shift of BODIPY dyes via through-bond energy transfer and its application for Fe3+-detection in live cell imaging
Xingyu Qu, Quan Liu, Xiaoning Ji, Huachao Chen, Zhikuan Zhou and Zhen Shen
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 4600-4602, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC31011B, Communication

Water-soluble ionic benzoporphyrins
Lin Jiang, Ross A. Zaenglein, James T. Engle, Chris Mittal, C. Scott Hartley, Christopher J. Ziegler and Hong Wang
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 6927-6929, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC31057K, Communication

Ruthenium-catalyzed regioselective oxidative coupling of aromatic and heteroaromatic esters with alkenes under an open atmosphere
Kishor Padala, Sandeep Pimparkar, Padmaja Madasamy and Masilamani Jeganmohan
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 7140-7142, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC33339B, Communication

Non-asymmetric organocatalysis
Polyssena Renzi and Marco Bella
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 6881-6896, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC31599H, Feature Article

Fluorescent detection of cholesterol using ß-cyclodextrin functionalized graphene
Avijit Mondal and Nikhil R. Jana
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 7316-7318, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC33410K, Communication

Personal glucose sensor for point-of-care early cancer diagnosis
Jiao Su, Jin Xu, Ying Chen, Yun Xiang, Ruo Yuan and Yaqin Chai
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 6909-6911, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC32729E, Communication

A 12-connected metal-organic framework constructed from an unprecedented cyclic dodecanuclear copper cluster
Huan Zhang, Ying Lu, Zhiming Zhang, Hai Fu, Yangguang Li, Dirk Volkmer, Dmytro Denysenko and Enbo Wang
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 7295-7297, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC32120C, Communication

Water-dispersible and biodegradable polymer micelles with good antibacterial efficacy
Weizhong Yuan, Jingren Wei, Hang Lu, Lang Fan and Jianzhong Du
Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 6857-6859, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC31529G, Communication

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to ChemComm? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively contact us with your suggestions.

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Silica sheets to deliver DNA into cells for disease prevention and treatment

Scientists in Japan have made a new DNA delivery substrate based on networks of bio-friendly upright silica sheets. The network of sheets forms a porous film on to which they can immobilise DNA, ready for delivery (transfection) into cells. The transfection efficiency of the silica film is approximately double that of solution-based transfection. Gene transfection is a potential method for preventing and treating diseases and analysing cell functions.

 

Silica sheets to deliver DNA into cells for disease prevention and treatment

Link to journal article
Silica-based Gene Reverse Transfection: Upright Nanosheet Network for Promoted DNA Delivery to Cell

Q Ji et al

Chem. Commun., 2012, DOI: 10.1039/c2cc34289h

 

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Bendy non-volatile flash memory data storage device

Scientists in Taiwan have made a flexible memory device, which they say could open up a new design approach for high performance flexible non-volatile resistive memory devices. Non-volatile devices are computer memory devices that can retain stored information even when not powered, for example read-only memory, flash memory, hard drives and floppy disks. 

The team’s device consists of a single-layer donor-acceptor conjugated polymer fabricated on plastic polyethylene naphthalene. It displayed a low threshold voltage (±2V), low switching power (~100µW cm-2), large on/off memory window (104), good retention (>104s) and excellent endurance against electrical and mechanical stimuli, they say.

Bendy non-volatile flash memory data storage device

 

Link to journal article
Poly(fluorene-thiophene) Donor Tethered Phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazole Acceptor for Flexible Nonvolatile Flash Resistive Memory Devices

H-C Wu et al
Chem. Commun
., 2012, DOI: 10.1039/c2cc34257j

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A new type of conducting polymer

Scientists in the US have reported a new type of conducting polymer, generated by a ROMP (ring opening metathesis polymerisation) reaction. The new polymers could have potentially useful properties, they say.

They reacted the complex (η5-C5H5)Ir(η4-C6H6) with Grubbs’ catalyst to give a polyacetylene consisting of cyclopentadienyliridium bound s-cis butadiene moieties separated by C=C linkages, a previously unavailable polyacetylene type.

Link to journal article
Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization of an
η4-Benzene Complex: A Direct Synthesis of a Polyacetylene with a Regular Pattern of Π Bound Metal Fragments
P D Zeits, T Fiedler and J A Gladysz
Chem. Commun.,
2012, DOI: 10.1039/c2cc32150e

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Film to aid drug metabolism study

A way to study drug metabolism using cytochrome P450 enzymes (which are involved in the metabolism of over 60% of clinically used drugs) has been developed by scientists in China.

The team made a film of indium tin oxide nanoparticles (they have good conductivity) and cytochrome P450s encapsulated by chitosan (which are biocompatible) on a carbon electrode. They were able to bioelectronically initiate cytochrome P450 catalysis by replacing electron donation from expensive nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate with electrodes.

The system has potential for applications in drug discovery and development by monitoring substrate metabolism and enzyme inhibition. Other applications include biosensors for toxicity analysis and bioreactors for chemical synthesis.

Film to aid drug metabolism study

 

Link to journal article
Electrochemically Driven Drug Metabolism via Cytochrome P450 2C9 Isozyme Microsomes with Cytochrome P450 Reductase and Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticle Composites

X Xu et al
Chem. Commun.,
2012, DOI: 10.1039/c2cc33575a

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