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Suzie Pun accepts Biomaterials Science Lectureship Award at SIPCD 2014

Suzie Pun, recipient of the inaugural Biomaterials Science lectureship, accepted her award at the 3rd Symposium on Innovative Polymers for Controlled Delivery (SIPCD 2014), which took place in Suzhou, China on 16-19th September and is where Suzie delivered her first Award Lecture. The award was presented by  Biomaterials Science Editorial Board member Jun Wang.

Suzie Pun accepts Biomaterials Science Lectureship Award

As part of the Lectureship, Suzie, a Professor in the bioengineering department at University of Washington, will also be presenting her Award Lecture at the 1st International Symposium on Immunobiomaterials in Tianjin, China, and NanoDDS 2014 in North Carolina, US.


Read Suzie Pun’s latest Biomaterials Science article

D. S. Chu, D. L. Sellers, M. J. Bocek, A. E. Fischedick, P. J. Horner and S. H. Pun
Polymers conjugated to multiple pendant bivalirudin peptides via MMP9-sensitive linkages were synthesized for localized thrombin inhibition.  Localized delivery of the polymers in an injectable hydrogel resulted in decreased cell proliferation and reduced astrogliosis after spinal cord injury.
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2014 Biomaterials Science Lectureship Awarded to Suzie Pun

It is with great pleasure that we announce Professor Suzie Pun (University of Washington) as the recipient of the inaugural Biomaterials Science Lectureship.

This award, which will be an annual event for the journal,  honours a younger scientist who has made a significant contribution to the biomaterials field. The recipient is selected by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board from a list of candidates nominated by the community.

More about Suzie…

Suzie H. Pun received her Chemical Engineering Ph.D. degree in 2000 from the California Institute of Technology.  She then worked as a senior scientist at Insert Therapeutics/Calando Pharmaceuticals for 3 years developing polymeric drug delivery systems before joining the Department of Bioengineering at University of Washington (UW).  She is currently the Robert J Rushmer Associate Professor of Bioengineering, an Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, and a member of the Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute at UW.  Her research focus area is in drug and gene delivery systems and she has published over 70 research articles in this area.  Current application areas for her group include biologics delivery to the central nervous system and cancer.  For this work, she was recognized with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2006. 

Take a look at this paper for an example of Suzie’s recent research:

Comparative study of guanidine-based and lysine-based brush copolymers for plasmid delivery Peter M. Carlson, Joan G. Schellinger, Joshuel A. Pahang, Russell N. Johnson and Suzie H. Pun  
Biomater. Sci., 2013, 1, 736-744 DOI: 10.1039/C3BM60079C 

We would like to thank everybody who nominated a candidate for the Lectureship- we received many excellent nominations, and the Editorial Board had a difficult task in choosing between some outstanding candidates.

We invite you to join us in congratulating Suzie in the comments below.

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Lectureship nominations close on Friday 7th March!

Time is running out to make your nominations for the Biomaterials Science Lectureship! Please submit your nominations by Friday 7th March 2014.

A reminder of the details…

Qualification

To be eligible for the Biomaterials Science Lectureship, the candidate should be in the earlier stages of their scientific career, typically within 15 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, and will have made a significant contribution to the field.

Description

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture three times, one of which will be located in the home country of the recipient. The Biomaterials Science Editorial Office will provide the sum of £1000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The award recipient will be presented with the award at one of the three award lectures. They will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased on the back cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Selection

The recipient of the award will be selected and endorsed by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board.

Nominations

Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee, including a brief C.V. (no longer than 2 pages A4) together with a letter (no longer than 2 pages A4) supporting the nomination, to the Biomaterials Science Editorial Office (biomaterialsscience-rsc@rsc.org ) by 7th March 2014.  Self-nomination is not permitted.

We look forward to receiving your nominations!

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Zeolite–polymer composite adsorbs uremic toxins

Scientists in Japan have developed a nanofibre mesh that can adsorb creatinine from blood with the hope that it can eventually be developed into a wearable blood-cleaning device for patients with kidney failure.

It is hoped the mesh can eventually be developed into a wearable blood-cleaning device

It is hoped the mesh can eventually be developed into a wearable blood-cleaning device

Kidney failure causes dangerous concentrations of waste products, such as potassium, urea and creatinine, to build-up in the body. Apart from having a kidney transplant, the next best solution for patients is dialysis. Dialysis, however, is far from ideal. It is time-consuming and relies on access to specialist equipment, clean water, electricity, dialysate, and, usually, a hospital. Often these requirements aren’t accessible in rural parts of developing countries and disaster areas.

Read the full article at Chemistry World.

Fabrication of zeolite–polymer composite nanofibers for removal of uremic toxins from kidney failure patients
Mitsuhiro Ebara  
Biomater. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3BM60263J

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Announcing new members of the Biomaterials Science Advisory Board

We are very pleased to introduce the new members of the Biomaterials Science Advisory Board:

Jianwu Dai is currently a Professor at the Intitute of Genetics and Developmental Biology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research is focused on stem cells and regerative medicine.

Professor Dai obtained a B.Sc. in Cell Biology at Wuhan University, China, before completing an M.Sc. in Biophysics at Beijing Medical University. He received his Ph.D. from Duke University Medical Center (USA) in 1998, before joining Harvard Medical School as a Postdoctoral trainee, working on animal genetics and stem cells.


Ali Khademhosseini is an Associate Professor at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School as well as an Associate Faculty at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and a Junior PI at Japan’s World Premier International-Advanced Institute for Materials Research at Tohoku University where he directs a satellite laboratory. He has authored more than 300 papers and 50 book chapters.   He has engineered a range of hydrogels for tissue engineering and utilized various micro- and nanoengineering approaches to further modify the hydrogel properties / architecture.

Dr. Khademhosseini’s interdisciplinary research has been recognized by over 30 major national and international awards.  He has received early career awards from three major engineering discipline societies: electrical (IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society award and IEEE Nanotechnology award), chemical (Colburn award from the AIChE) and mechanical engineering (Y.C. Fung award from the ASME).  He is also a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honour given by the US government for early career investigators. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).   He received his Ph.D. in bioengineering from MIT (2005), and MASc (2001) and BASc (1999) degrees from University of Toronto, both in chemical engineering.


Doo Sung Lee received his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from the Seoul National University in 1978 and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). Since 1984 he has been a Professor of  the School of Chemical Engineering at the Sungkyunkwan University, where he served as the Dean of the College of Engineering from 2005 to 2007.

Doo Sung Lee was elected as a member of the Korean Academy of Science and Technology in 2011 and was made a member of the National Academy of Engineering of Korea in 2012. He was a president of the Polymer Society of Korea in 2013. Since 2010, he has been a director of Theranostic Macromolecules Research Center funded by National Research Foundation of Korea  His research group studies on the development of functionalized & biodegradable injectable hydrogels and micelles for controlled drug and protein delivery and molecular imaging.


Suzie H. Pun received her Chemical Engineering Ph.D. degree in 2000 from the California Institute of Technology.  She then worked as a senior scientist at Insert Therapeutics for 3 years before joining the Department of Bioengineering at University of Washington (UW).  She is currently the Robert J Rushmer Associate Professor of Bioengineering, an Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, and a member of the Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute at UW.  Her research focus area is in drug and gene delivery systems and she has published over 75 research articles in this area.  For this work, she was recognized with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2006.


Xintao Shuai received his Ph. D. degree in 1996 from Beijing Institute of Technology (China). After working for some years as a visiting scholar or postdoc at North Carolina State University, Philipps-University Marburg and Case Western Reserve University, he joined Sun Yat-sen University, China in 2005 as a professor of polymer science in the School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and professor by courtesy of biomedical engineering in the School of Medicine. Dr. Shuai’s research interests include polymeric nano-biomaterials for drug delivery and MRI-visible theranostic systems for disease diagnosis and treatment. He has published over 80 peer reviewed journal articles.


Joyce Wong is a Professor in Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering at Boston University. She directs the Biomimetic Materials Engineering Laboratory which is focused on developing biomaterial systems that mimic physiological and pathophysiological environments to study fundamental cellular processes at the biointerface. Current research includes vascular tissue engineering, theranostics, and engineering biomimetic systems to study restenosis and cancer metastasis.


We are delighted to welcome these six distinguished scientists to the Biomaterials Science team. For a full list of Biomaterials Science Editorial and Advisory board members, please see the website.

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Inaugural Biomaterials Science Lectureship: Nominations now open

Do you know someone who deserves recognition for their contribution to the biomaterials field? 

Now is your chance to propose they receive the accolade they deserve. 

Biomaterials Science is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for its Biomaterials Science Lectureship 2014.  New in 2014, this award will be run annually by the journal to honour a younger scientist who has made a significant contribution to the biomaterials field. 

Qualification 

To be eligible for the Biomaterials Science Lectureship, the candidate should be in the earlier stages of their scientific career, typically within 15 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, and will have made a significant contribution to the field. 

Description 

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture three times, one of which will be located in the home country of the recipient. The Biomaterials Science Editorial Office will provide the sum of £1000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs. 

The award recipient will be presented with the award at one of the three award lectures. They will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased on the back cover of the issue in which their article is published. 

Selection 

The recipient of the award will be selected and endorsed by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board. 

Nominations 

Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee, including a brief C.V. (no longer than 2 pages A4) together with a letter (no longer than 2 pages A4) supporting the nomination, to the Biomaterials Science Editorial Office (biomaterialsscience-rsc@rsc.org ) by 7th March 2014.  Self-nomination is not permitted.

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Editor-in-Chief Phillip Messersmith interviewed in Chemistry World

Phillip Messersmith, Biomaterials Science co-Editor-in-Chief, has been interviewed in Chemistry World about his work on biological adhesives to develop new biomaterials for the repair, replacement, or augmentation of human tissue.

Here are some highlights from the interview:

…What are the main applications for your synthetic polymers, are they just biomedical?
Not exclusively, but the funding sources right now are primarily in health related areas. We have a lot of funding from the National Institutes of Health in the US and obviously their main interest at the end of the day is to contribute to basic understanding as well as the applications of new materials, new devices and new therapies. So we work through the government funding as well as some corporate and institutional funding towards applications. The application you mentioned before, fetal surgery, has been a great passion for me over the last few years. I only really became involved in this three–four years ago but it’s become really important to me.
It’s the kind of medical problem that has too small a market to interest big companies and so the surgeons work in this area and do wonderful things without having all the tools they would like. One example of a tool they need is for sealing ruptures in the fetal membrane that occur spontaneously or after an interventional procedure. The ruptures can lead to leakage of amniotic fluid and when that happens you have two major problems. First, is the risk of infection and second is the premature induction of labour. Either way you have a very serious medical problem for the mother and the fetus and there aren’t many ways to treat this apart from bed rest.
There’s a small community of fetal surgeons that have trained for many years to try and avoid these ruptures but if it happens there’s not a lot they can do. So we’re developing materials to try and seal the membranes after rupture. Here obviously the tissue is wet and there’s a large volume of high ionic strength fluid. This is not very different from the conditions encountered by mussels- thus providing a great argument for learning how mussels and other marine organisms can accomplish wet adhesion.

How easy is it to make these materials biocompatible?
That’s a great question and something we spend a lot of time thinking about. Biocompatibility is an all-encompassing word: but it’s all about context. All we can say is we try to develop systems based on biocompatible polymers and DOPA and then formulate them in a way that doesn’t induce a severe inflammatory response. But any synthetic material has some level of that response. There’s an interesting give and take between in vitro results and in vivo results. A positive in vitro result won’t necessarily translate to a positive in vivo result. One of the interesting things is that the opposite is also true. Sometimes in vivo cell toxicity assays give a borderline response but in vivo we see really good results. We choose the polymers and how we go about the functionalisation and purification very carefully and then we do in vitro and in vivo tests.

Going back slightly, what made you get into bioadhesion?
The guy I mentioned earlier, Herbert Waite. When I was a young faculty member I used to block off one full day a month and just go to the library and look at all the new journal issues that had come in. And I used to try and make a point of trying to read out of my comfort zone, in areas I really wasn’t trained in. And one of those times I encountered one of his papers which described these proteins, the mussel adhesive proteins. And I said, wow, this is really interesting. Then I started looking for more of his papers and it just struck me, as a materials scientist, as an interesting translation opportunity, which it’s turned out to be. To this day I often tell my students that story because I don’t think they really appreciate how important it is not just to read the literature, but to read the literature outside of what you happen to be looking for that day, that hour…

Read the full interview with Laura Howes here

Follow the latest journal news on Twitter @BioMaterSci or go to our Facebook page.

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign-up to our RSS feed or Table of contents

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Take 1.. minute for chemistry in health

Do you know how chemical scientists can tackle global challenges in Human Health? If so, the RSC is running a one minute video competition this summer for young researchers such as PhD and Post-doc students; get involved and innovate the way scientists share their research. Your video should communicate your own personal research or an area of research that interests you, highlighting its significance and impact to Human Health.

Five videos will be shortlisted by our judging panel and the winner will be selected during the ‘How does chemistry keep us healthy?’ themed National Chemistry Week taking place 16-23 November.

A £500 prize and a fantastic opportunity to shadow the award winning video Journalist, Brady Harran, is up for grabs for the winner.

The judging panel will include the makers of The Periodic Tale of Videos, Martyn Poliakoff and Brady Harran, and RSC Division representatives.

Check out the webpage for further details of the competition and an example video.

The competition will open 02 April 2013 and the closing date for entries is 01 July 2013. Please submit your entries to rsc.li/take-1-video-competition.

Any questions please contact science@rsc.org.

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Top 10 Most-accessed Biomaterials Science articles in January

This month sees the following articles in Biomaterials Science that are in the top ten most accessed for January:

Taking tissue adhesives to the future: from traditional synthetic to new biomimetic approaches
Lígia Pereira Bré ,  Yu Zheng ,  Ana Paula Pêgo and Wenxin Wang
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 239-253
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00121G

Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for the design of smart delivery nanodevices
Montserrat Colilla ,  Blanca González and María Vallet-Regí
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 114-134
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00085G

Enzyme responsive materials: design strategies and future developments
Mischa Zelzer ,  Simon J. Todd ,  Andrew R. Hirst ,  Tom O. McDonald and Rein V. Ulijn
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 11-39
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00041E

Electrospinning and additive manufacturing: converging technologies

Paul D. Dalton ,  Cédryck Vaquette ,  Brooke L. Farrugia ,  Tim R. Dargaville ,  Toby D. Brown and Dietmar W. Hutmacher
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 171-185
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00039C

A facile fabrication of upconversion luminescent and mesoporous core–shell structured ß-NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+@mSiO2 nanocomposite spheres for anti-cancer drug delivery and cell imaging
Chunxia Li ,  Zhiyao Hou ,  Yunlu Dai ,  Dongmei Yang ,  Ziyong Cheng ,  Ping’an Ma and Jun Lin
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 213-223
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00087C

Three-dimensional cell culture based on microfluidic techniques to mimic living tissues
Yuya Morimoto and Shoji Takeuchi
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 257-264
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00117A

The thermogelling PLGA–PEG–PLGA block copolymer as a sustained release matrix of doxorubicin
Lin Yu ,  Tianyuan Ci ,  Shuchun Zhou ,  Wenjiao Zeng and Jiandong Ding
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 411-420
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00159D

DNA origami technology for biomaterials
applications
Masayuki Endo ,  Yangyang Yang and Hiroshi Sugiyama
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 347-360
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00154C

Understanding the role of nano-topography on the surface of a bone-implant
Alexey Klymov ,  Ljupcho Prodanov ,  Edwin Lamers ,  John A Jansen and X Frank Walboomers
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 135-151
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00032F

A fluorescent double-network-structured hybrid nanogel as embeddable nanoglucometer for intracellular glucometry
Jiao Fan ,  Xiaomei Jiang ,  Yumei Hu ,  Yan Si ,  Li Ding and Weitai Wu
Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 421-433
DOI: 10.1039/C2BM00162D

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Biomaterials Science? Then why not submit to us today!

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Introducing Biomaterials Science Editorial Board Member Justin Cooper-White

Professor Justin Cooper-White, Editorial Board member

Professor Cooper-White graduated with his Bachelors of Engineering (Chemical) in 1991, University of Queensland, and thereafter worked for Shell (Australia) Pty. Ltd. for 5 years as a practicing chemical engineer and processing manager. He commenced his Ph.D. in 1996 and was awarded his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering (Biomedical Polymers), UQ, in March 2000. He subsequently held a postdoctoral position at the University of Melbourne (UMelb) under the mentorship of Prof. David V. Boger, and joined the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at UMelb as a tenured Senior Lecturer in early 2003. In 2004 he move to the University of Queensland (UQ) to head a new initiative in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering in the Department of Chemical Engineering and in 2007 was promoted to Professor of Bioengineering. He currently holds the positions of Group Leader within the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN, UQ), (inaugural) Director of the Queensland Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF-Q), and Associate Dean (Research) for the Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology at UQ. Prof. Cooper-White has over 150 refereed publications and over 300 conference abstracts. His work has appeared in high impact journals in his field and he has also produced 6 Worldwide patents that have reached National Phase Entry in USA, Europe and Australia.

Biomaterials Science is now accepting submissions. All articles will be free to access until the end of 2014. Please contact the editorial office if you have any questions about the journal.

Follow the latest journal news on Twitter @BioMaterSci or go to our Facebook page.

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign-up to our RSS feed or Table of contents alert.

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