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Outstanding Reviewers for Biomaterials Science in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Biomaterials Science in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Zhaowei Chen, University of North Carolina
Dr Qingxin Mu, University of Washington
Dr Yunhua Shi, MIT
Dr Yong Wang, Penn State University
Dr Zhibin Wang, Stanford University
Dr Qiang Wei, Max Planck Institute
Dr Yi Wen, Duke University
Dr Menghua Xiong, University of Illinois
Dr Yi Zhang, MIT
Dr Yi Zhao, University of North Carolina

We would also like to thank the Biomaterials Science board and the biomaterials community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

 

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Chemoluminescent nanoparticles detect multiple deadly viruses in one go

A blood transfusion can be a life-saving gift – but if that blood unwittingly contains a deadly virus, it can kill instead of cure. Medical staff therefore needs to be able to quickly and easily screen blood for viruses and a new system developed by researchers in China can do just that: it checks for three viruses – HIV, hepatitis C and hepatitis B – all at once and could even be adapted for more.

Chemoluminescent nanoparticles

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry
First, all viruses’ DNA is amplified at the same time (top left). Then, the researchers add a virus-specific nucleic acids sitting on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles – when it detects a virus it can match up with, the nanoparticle emits light once certain chemicals have been added


The quickest way to test a sample for viruses is by looking for their DNA or RNA –unlike antibody based tests this doesn’t need to wait for the body’s immune response to kick in before showing a result. Nongyue He’s team at Southwest University uses a process called amplification to multiply several viruses’ DNA or RNA at the same time, making enough to generate a strong signal when tested.


Read the full story by Susannah May in Chemistry World.



This article is free to access until 16 January 2016.

Z Ali et al, Biomater. Sci., 2017. DOI: 10.1039/C6BM00527F

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