Archive for the ‘Editorial Board’ Category

Introducing new Editorial Board Member Adah Almutairi

We are very pleased to welcome Professor Adah Almutairi to the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board.

Adah Almutairi is co-director of the joint KACST-UC San Diego Center for Excellence in Nanomedicine and Engineering and an associate professor in the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at UC San Diego, with secondary appointments in NanoEngineering and Materials Science. Her own research group, the Laboratory for Bioresponsive Materials, creates novel smart materials for on-demand drug delivery, regeneration of damaged tissue, and safe image-based diagnosis. She came to UC San Diego in 2008 from UC Berkeley, where she worked with Professor Jean Fréchet to develop several nanoprobes for in vivo imaging of pH and angiogenesis.  Prof. Almutairi is the recipient of an NIH New Innovator Award and has been recognized as a rising star in the field of polymeric materials by Chemical Communications and the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering.

Adah’s recent papers include:

Increasing materials’ response to two-photon NIR light via self-immolative dendritic scaffolds
Nadezda Fomina, Cathryn L. McFearin and Adah Almutairi  
Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 9138-9140 DOI: 10.1039/C2CC00072E

Metal chelating crosslinkers form nanogels with high chelation stability
Jacques Lux, Minnie Chan, Luce Vander Elst, Eric Schopf, Enas Mahmoud, Sophie Laurent and Adah Almutairi  
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2013, 1, 6359-6364 DOI: 10.1039/C3TB21104E, Paper

Antigen-loaded pH-sensitive hydrogel microparticles are taken up by dendritic cells with no requirement for targeting antibodies
Laura E. Ruff, Enas A. Mahmoud, Jagadis Sankaranarayanan, José M. Morachis, Carol D. Katayama, Maripat Corr, Stephen M. Hedrick and Adah Almutairi  
Integr. Biol., 2013, 5, 195-203 DOI: 10.1039/C2IB20109G

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Editor-in-Chief Phillip Messersmith interviewed in Chemistry World

Phillip Messersmith, Biomaterials Science co-Editor-in-Chief, has been interviewed in Chemistry World about his work on biological adhesives to develop new biomaterials for the repair, replacement, or augmentation of human tissue.

Here are some highlights from the interview:

…What are the main applications for your synthetic polymers, are they just biomedical?
Not exclusively, but the funding sources right now are primarily in health related areas. We have a lot of funding from the National Institutes of Health in the US and obviously their main interest at the end of the day is to contribute to basic understanding as well as the applications of new materials, new devices and new therapies. So we work through the government funding as well as some corporate and institutional funding towards applications. The application you mentioned before, fetal surgery, has been a great passion for me over the last few years. I only really became involved in this three–four years ago but it’s become really important to me.
It’s the kind of medical problem that has too small a market to interest big companies and so the surgeons work in this area and do wonderful things without having all the tools they would like. One example of a tool they need is for sealing ruptures in the fetal membrane that occur spontaneously or after an interventional procedure. The ruptures can lead to leakage of amniotic fluid and when that happens you have two major problems. First, is the risk of infection and second is the premature induction of labour. Either way you have a very serious medical problem for the mother and the fetus and there aren’t many ways to treat this apart from bed rest.
There’s a small community of fetal surgeons that have trained for many years to try and avoid these ruptures but if it happens there’s not a lot they can do. So we’re developing materials to try and seal the membranes after rupture. Here obviously the tissue is wet and there’s a large volume of high ionic strength fluid. This is not very different from the conditions encountered by mussels- thus providing a great argument for learning how mussels and other marine organisms can accomplish wet adhesion.

How easy is it to make these materials biocompatible?
That’s a great question and something we spend a lot of time thinking about. Biocompatibility is an all-encompassing word: but it’s all about context. All we can say is we try to develop systems based on biocompatible polymers and DOPA and then formulate them in a way that doesn’t induce a severe inflammatory response. But any synthetic material has some level of that response. There’s an interesting give and take between in vitro results and in vivo results. A positive in vitro result won’t necessarily translate to a positive in vivo result. One of the interesting things is that the opposite is also true. Sometimes in vivo cell toxicity assays give a borderline response but in vivo we see really good results. We choose the polymers and how we go about the functionalisation and purification very carefully and then we do in vitro and in vivo tests.

Going back slightly, what made you get into bioadhesion?
The guy I mentioned earlier, Herbert Waite. When I was a young faculty member I used to block off one full day a month and just go to the library and look at all the new journal issues that had come in. And I used to try and make a point of trying to read out of my comfort zone, in areas I really wasn’t trained in. And one of those times I encountered one of his papers which described these proteins, the mussel adhesive proteins. And I said, wow, this is really interesting. Then I started looking for more of his papers and it just struck me, as a materials scientist, as an interesting translation opportunity, which it’s turned out to be. To this day I often tell my students that story because I don’t think they really appreciate how important it is not just to read the literature, but to read the literature outside of what you happen to be looking for that day, that hour…

Read the full interview with Laura Howes here

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Introducing Biomaterials Science Editorial Board Member Justin Cooper-White

Professor Justin Cooper-White, Editorial Board member

Professor Cooper-White graduated with his Bachelors of Engineering (Chemical) in 1991, University of Queensland, and thereafter worked for Shell (Australia) Pty. Ltd. for 5 years as a practicing chemical engineer and processing manager. He commenced his Ph.D. in 1996 and was awarded his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering (Biomedical Polymers), UQ, in March 2000. He subsequently held a postdoctoral position at the University of Melbourne (UMelb) under the mentorship of Prof. David V. Boger, and joined the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at UMelb as a tenured Senior Lecturer in early 2003. In 2004 he move to the University of Queensland (UQ) to head a new initiative in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering in the Department of Chemical Engineering and in 2007 was promoted to Professor of Bioengineering. He currently holds the positions of Group Leader within the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN, UQ), (inaugural) Director of the Queensland Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF-Q), and Associate Dean (Research) for the Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology at UQ. Prof. Cooper-White has over 150 refereed publications and over 300 conference abstracts. His work has appeared in high impact journals in his field and he has also produced 6 Worldwide patents that have reached National Phase Entry in USA, Europe and Australia.

Biomaterials Science is now accepting submissions. All articles will be free to access until the end of 2014. Please contact the editorial office if you have any questions about the journal.

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Introducing Biomaterials Science Editorial Board Member Sarah Heilshorn

Professor Sarah Heilshorn, Editorial Board member

Sarah Heilshorn completed her undergraduate studies in chemical engineering at Georgia Tech. She then earned her MS and PhD in chemical engineering at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) under the supervision of David A. Tirrell. While a graduate student, she was also a visiting scholar in the Department of Polymer Science at the Kyoto Institute of Technology through a National Science Foundation East Asia Fellowship. She was awarded the Caltech Everhart Lectureship for her PhD thesis work in 2004. Following this, Prof. Heilshorn was a postdoctoral scholar with Mu-ming Poo at the University of California, Berkeley in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology. In 2006 she joined Stanford University as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering. She also holds courtesy faculty appointments in the Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering. Her research laboratory studies the dynamics of biological and bio-inspired systems at multiple length scales, including the molecular through to the multi-cellular level. Current topics of investigation include the design of injectable materials for stem cell and drug delivery, protein-engineered materials for regenerative medicine scaffolds, and peptide-based self-assembly materials for templated nanoparticle synthesis. In 2009, she was selected for the National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the National Institutes of Health New Innovator Award for young faculty.

Biomaterials Science is now accepting submissions. All articles will be free to access until the end of 2014. Please contact the editorial office if you have any questions about the journal.

Follow the latest journal news on Twitter @BioMaterSci or go to our Facebook page.

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Introducing Biomaterials Science Editorial Board Member Patrick S. Stayton

Prof. Patrick S. Stayton, Editorial Board member

Patrick Stayton currently serves as the Washington Research Foundation Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington. He is the founding Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering and Sciences, and the Center for Intracellular Delivery of Biologics. He received his B.S. in Biology (summa cum laude) from Illinois State University in 1984, his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Illinois in 1989, and was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, also at the University of Illinois.

Dr. Stayton’s eclectic research group works at the interface of fundamental molecular science and applied molecular bioengineering. His laboratory has fundamental projects aimed at elucidating the basic principles underlying biomolecular recognition, and connected projects applying these principles to medical applications in the drug delivery, medical diagnostics, and regenerative medicine fields. He has published over 200 scientific papers. Dr. Stayton has a strong interest in translating the group’s research, has been awarded several patents, and is a co-founder of the startup companies PhaseRx Inc. based on his group’s biologic drug delivery work, and Nexgenia based on their diagnostic work.

Dr. Stayton has been elected as a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and has been the recipient of the Clemson Award from the Society For Biomaterials and the CRS-Cygnus Recognition Award from the Controlled Release Society. He served as Co-Chair of the Gordon Conference on Drug Carriers in Medicine and Biology in 2010. He has also been awarded the 2009 Faculty Research Innovation Award, UW College of Engineering, and the Distinguished Teacher and Mentor Award from the Department of Bioengineering.

Biomaterials Science is now accepting submissions. All articles will be free to access until the end of 2014. Please contact the editorial office if you have any questions about the journal.

Follow the latest journal news on Twitter @BioMaterSci or go to our Facebook page.

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Interview with Hiroshi Sugiyama

Hiroshi Sugiyama1.      What led you to specialise in biomaterials?
For the past 25 years, I have been exploring the nucleic acids using organic chemistry, biochemistry and computational chemistry. The ability of DNA to weave together and bind other molecules, which allow it to act as a scaffold for complex Nano machinery, has always fascinated me. Recent progress in DNA origami further motivated me to employ DNA as a construction material for the supra-molecular ‘bottom-up’ engineering in nano-sciences. 

2.      What projects are you working on at the moment?
My research is centered on the chemical biology of nucleic acids and integrates DNA nanotechnology and creation of artificial genetic switch. Nanotechnology group uses DNA origami techniques to build nano- and meso-sized structures to acquire vital mechanistic knowledge that could be exploited in gene regulation. 

We are also developing sequence-specific DNA binding Pyrrole-Imidazole polyamides as artificial genetic `ON` and `OFF` switch. Based on our recent promising results we are establishing a novel chemical approach to selectively and epigenetically induce pluripotency in somatic cells with our designed molecules. 

Read the full interview…

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Introducing Biomaterials Science Editorial Board Member Giuseppe Battaglia

Prof. Giuseppe BattagliaProf. Giuseppe Battaglia, Editorial Board member 
Giuseppe, or as most people call him, Beppe, obtained his “Laura” in Chemical Engineering in 2001 from the University of Palermo (Italy), followed by a period of industrial research at the ICI Strategic Technology Group (now part of AkzoNobel) at Wilton, UK. In 2002, he joined Prof. Anthony Ryan’s research group for a PhD in Physical Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Sheffield (UoS). In 2006 immediately after submitting his PhD thesis, Beppe was appointed to a fixed term lectureship within the Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering group in the Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. 3 years later he relocated to a permanent position within the Department of Biomedical Science where he was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 2009 and to a Personal Chair in 2011. Beppe is now the Professor of Synthetic Biology and one of the youngest professor in the Univerisity. Beppe is the recipient of the prestigious Human Frontiers of Science Young Investigator Program together with Prof. A. Engler (UCSD) and the 2011 ERC STG Award as well as the 2011 APS/IoP Polymer Physics Exchange Lecture and the 2011 GSK Emerging Scientist Award. Beppe’s research is focused on the investigation of the specific design rules behind inter/intramolecular interactions and self-assembly of soft matter systems often taking inspiration from biological systems such as cells and viruses. These are subsequently translated into the engineering of nanostructured biomaterials such as nanoscopic vectors and/or synthetic scaffolds.

Biomaterials Science is now accepting submissions. All articles will be free to access until the end of 2014. Please contact the editorial office if you have any questions about the journal.

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Introducing two new Editorial Board members Mark Bradley & Jun Wang

Jun Wang

Jun Wang, Editorial Board member
Jun Wang received a joint B.S. in Chemistry and Cell Biology at Wuhan University in 1993 in China and a Ph.D. in Polymer Chemistry and Physics from Wuhan University in 1999. He has been a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins Singapore and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine from 1999 to 2004. In 2004 he joined the faculty of University of Science and Technology of China as a professor of Life Sciences and Polymer Chemistry. He is a joint professor of Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale of China. He received the Capsugel Innovation Award in Controlled Drug Delivery from the Controlled Release Society in 2001. He was selected as the awardee of “One Hundred Talents” of Chinese Academy of Science in 2005 and received “Outstanding Young Scholar Award” of National Science Foundation of China in 2011. His main research interest is biomaterials for drug, siRNA delivery and nanomedicine.

Mark BradleyMark Bradley, Editorial Board member
Mark received his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1989 under the supervision of Professor Sir Jack Baldwin, followed by post-doctoral studies at Harvard Medical School and returned to the UK as a Royal Society Fellow at Southampton University in the early 90’s. In 1996 at the age of 34 he was made a Professor of Combinatorial Chemistry. He has been elected to fellowships of both the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and has held the Novartis Young Investigator Award, the Zeneca Research Award for Organic Chemistry, the GlaxoWellcome Award for Innovative Chemistry, the Pfizer Award in Organic chemistry and more recently, the Novartis Chemistry Lectureship and the Award from the Society of Combinatorial Sciences. In 2011 he was awarded the Chancellors Award for research. His group has published over 240 peer reviewed papers and 20 patents and more than 65 PhD students have graduated from his group.

Three themes dominate at this time:
(i). The development and exploitation of polymer microarray technology for the identification and application of polymers for controlling and modulating cells.
(ii). The development of “smart” fluorescent reporters for clinical optical imaging.
(iii). In vivo catalytic chemistry.

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Welcome to our Biomaterials Science Editorial Board members!

I am delighted to announce the addition of four esteemed scientists to the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board. Welcome Giuseppe Battaglia, Mark Bradley, Pat Stayton and Jun Wang!

Together with our Editors-in-Chief and Associate Editors, our Editorial Board members will shape the direction of the journal and I look forward to working with them all to make Biomaterials Science a leading journal in the field. 

Keep an eye out for further Editorial and Advisory Board appointments! Also, coming soon – interviews with our new Editorial Board members. Find out more about their research interests and their thoughts on the future of Biomaterials Science!

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Interview with Biomaterials Science Editor-in-Chief Professor Norio Nakatsuji

Prof Nakatsuji Norio Nakatsuji received his Doctor of Science in developmental biology from the Graduate School of Science of Kyoto University in 1977. He then spent several years in postdoctoral training at Umea University in Sweden, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and George Washington University in the United States, and MRC Mammalian Development Unit in the United Kingdom. He returned to Japan to join the Meiji Institute of Health Science in 1984, and became a professor at the National Institute of Genetics in 1991. In 1999, Prof Nakatsuji joined the Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences at Kyoto University, where his laboratory established monkey embryonic stem cell lines in 2000. In 2003, his group succeeded in establishing human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, five of which (KhES1–5) are presently in distribution to other researchers throughout Japan. In 2007 he became the founding director of Kyoto University’s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), which aims to advance cross-disciplinary research and technological innovation based on cell biology, chemistry, and physics. His laboratory is presently focussed on multidisciplinary research including screening of chemical compounds for control of stem cells, utilisation of biomaterials for stem cell research and application, and creation of neurodegenerative disease model cells using genetically modified human ES/iPS cells.

1. What led you to specialise in your current areas of research, including biomaterials?
I started my scientific career as a developmental biologist. My interests in mammalian development lead me to mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in 1984 during my stay in London. After returning to Japan and establishing my own laboratory, our ES cell-related research extended to monkey and human ES cells, which further expanded my interests to include biomedical applications of such wonderful cell lines and synergic combinations with functional smart materials.

Read the full interview

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