Author Archive

Introducing two new Editorial Board members Mark Bradley & Jun Wang

Jun Wang

Jun Wang, Editorial Board member
Jun Wang received a joint B.S. in Chemistry and Cell Biology at Wuhan University in 1993 in China and a Ph.D. in Polymer Chemistry and Physics from Wuhan University in 1999. He has been a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins Singapore and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine from 1999 to 2004. In 2004 he joined the faculty of University of Science and Technology of China as a professor of Life Sciences and Polymer Chemistry. He is a joint professor of Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale of China. He received the Capsugel Innovation Award in Controlled Drug Delivery from the Controlled Release Society in 2001. He was selected as the awardee of “One Hundred Talents” of Chinese Academy of Science in 2005 and received “Outstanding Young Scholar Award” of National Science Foundation of China in 2011. His main research interest is biomaterials for drug, siRNA delivery and nanomedicine.

Mark BradleyMark Bradley, Editorial Board member
Mark received his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1989 under the supervision of Professor Sir Jack Baldwin, followed by post-doctoral studies at Harvard Medical School and returned to the UK as a Royal Society Fellow at Southampton University in the early 90’s. In 1996 at the age of 34 he was made a Professor of Combinatorial Chemistry. He has been elected to fellowships of both the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and has held the Novartis Young Investigator Award, the Zeneca Research Award for Organic Chemistry, the GlaxoWellcome Award for Innovative Chemistry, the Pfizer Award in Organic chemistry and more recently, the Novartis Chemistry Lectureship and the Award from the Society of Combinatorial Sciences. In 2011 he was awarded the Chancellors Award for research. His group has published over 240 peer reviewed papers and 20 patents and more than 65 PhD students have graduated from his group.

Three themes dominate at this time:
(i). The development and exploitation of polymer microarray technology for the identification and application of polymers for controlling and modulating cells.
(ii). The development of “smart” fluorescent reporters for clinical optical imaging.
(iii). In vivo catalytic chemistry.

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Sign-up for the Biomaterials Science Newsletter

Biomaterials Science NewsletterThe latest issue of the Biomaterials Science newsletter is out. It contains a roundup of all the latest news about the journal.

If you’d like to keep-up with how the journal then why not sign up for the next issue?

Don’t forget you can also Like us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter to keep up with the latest news.

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Call for Papers: Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

Biomaterials ScienceBiomaterials Science (a new journal from RSC Publishing and the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan) invites you to submit your next high impact article to the journal.

Publishing only very high quality articles, the journal will cover the fundamental science of biomaterials though to their biomedical applications, including ‘Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine’.

Articles will be free to access* until the end of 2014 giving your article the widest possible audience.

We encourage you to support Biomaterials Science and not-for-profit publishing by submitting your next high impact article on the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. You can find our online submission system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bmsci

Don’t forget to keep up with the latest news from Biomaterials Science you can Like us on Facebook, Follow us on Twitter or sign up for the newsletter.

Sign up for the Biomaterials Science RSS feed or Table of Contents alert to find out about the first articles once they’re published online.

*Individuals can access the content by signing up for an RSC Publishing Personal Account. Existing institutional RSC journal subscribers, with registered IP, have automatic access. Other institutions can register for free access.

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Interview with Biomaterials Science Editor-in-Chief Professor Norio Nakatsuji

Prof Nakatsuji Norio Nakatsuji received his Doctor of Science in developmental biology from the Graduate School of Science of Kyoto University in 1977. He then spent several years in postdoctoral training at Umea University in Sweden, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and George Washington University in the United States, and MRC Mammalian Development Unit in the United Kingdom. He returned to Japan to join the Meiji Institute of Health Science in 1984, and became a professor at the National Institute of Genetics in 1991. In 1999, Prof Nakatsuji joined the Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences at Kyoto University, where his laboratory established monkey embryonic stem cell lines in 2000. In 2003, his group succeeded in establishing human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, five of which (KhES1–5) are presently in distribution to other researchers throughout Japan. In 2007 he became the founding director of Kyoto University’s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), which aims to advance cross-disciplinary research and technological innovation based on cell biology, chemistry, and physics. His laboratory is presently focussed on multidisciplinary research including screening of chemical compounds for control of stem cells, utilisation of biomaterials for stem cell research and application, and creation of neurodegenerative disease model cells using genetically modified human ES/iPS cells.

1. What led you to specialise in your current areas of research, including biomaterials?
I started my scientific career as a developmental biologist. My interests in mammalian development lead me to mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in 1984 during my stay in London. After returning to Japan and establishing my own laboratory, our ES cell-related research extended to monkey and human ES cells, which further expanded my interests to include biomedical applications of such wonderful cell lines and synergic combinations with functional smart materials.

Read the full interview

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Materials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative medicine – Free for 4 weeks

Biomaterials ScienceIf you’re a regular reader of our blog hopefully you’ve already read about the launch of Biomaterials Science; but in case you haven’t Biomaterials Science is a new journal published by RSC Publishing in collaboration with the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan. You can read about the scope of Biomaterials Science here, but briefly Biomaterials Science will cover the fundamental science of biomaterials through to their biomedical applications.

Biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is an important topic covered by Biomaterials Science so to celebrate the launch, and highlight the area, we’ve made a selection of articles from across RSC journals free to read for 4 weeks.
 

Click here for the full list of free articles

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Keep up to date with the news from Biomaterials Science

Don’t forget there’s a variety of ways to keep up with the latest news about the launch of Biomaterials Science.

For the latest news you can:

… And although it’ll be a few months yet before the first articles are published, if you want to be amongst the first to read them online you can sign up for the Biomaterials Science RSS feed or the table of contents e-Alert.

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Biomaterials Reviews from Soft Matter & Journal of Materials Chemistry – free until 31st May

Biomaterials Science, Soft Matter & Journal of Materials ChemistryHere’s a medley of biomaterials related reviews published in Soft Matter & Journal of Materials Chemistry. To celebrate the launch of Biomaterials Science we’ve made them all free to download until 31st May. I hope you enjoy reading them.

Highlight
Biofabrication: programmable assembly of polysaccharide hydrogels in microfluidics as biocompatible scaffolds
Yi Cheng,  Xiaolong Luo,  Gregory F. Payne and Gary W. Rubloff,
J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22, 7659-7666

Review Article
Surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles for stem cell labeling
Koon Gee Neoh and En Tang Kang,
Soft Matter, 2012, 8, 2057-2069

Emerging Area
Inhibiting, promoting, and preserving stability of functional protein fibrils
Owen Griffith Jones and Raffaele Mezzenga,
Soft Matter, 2012, 8, 876-895

Review
Shear-thinning hydrogels for biomedical applications
Murat Guvendiren ,  Hoang D. Lu and Jason A. Burdick,
Soft Matter, 2012, 8, 260-272

Feature Article
Biomimetic composites and stem cells interaction for bone and cartilage tissue regeneration
N. Naveena ,  J. Venugopal,  R. Rajeswari,  S. Sundarrajan,  R. Sridhar,  M. Shayanti,  S. Narayanan and S. Ramakrishna,
J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22, 5239-5253

Feature Article
Biofunctionalization of nanoparticles for cytosensing and cell surface carbohydrate assay
Lin Ding and Huangxian Ju,
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 18154-18173

Feature Article
Biological modifications of materials surfaces with proteins for regenerative medicine
Binata Joddar and Yoshihiro Ito,
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 13737-13755

Feature Article
Single-walled carbon nanotubes in biomedical imaging
Zhuang Liu, Kai Yang and Shuit-Tong Lee,
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 586-598

Feature Article
Emerging functional nanomaterials for therapeutics
Xuejia Xue,  Feng Wang and Xiaogang Liu,
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 13107-13127

Feature Article
Mesoporous silica nanoparticle based nano drug delivery systems: synthesis, controlled drug release and delivery, pharmacokinetics and biocompatibility
Qianjun He and Jianlin Shi,
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 5845-5855

Review Article
Designing biomimetic scaffolds for bone regeneration: why aim for a copy of mature tissue properties if nature uses a different approach?
Bettina M. Willie,  Ansgar Petersen,  Katharina Schmidt-Bleek,  Amaia Cipitria,  Manav Mehta,  Patrick Strube,  Jasmin Lienau,  Britt Wildemann,  Peter Fratzl and Georg Duda,
Soft Matter, 2010, 6, 4976-4987

Review Article
Design of biomaterials to enhance stem cell survival when transplanted into the damaged central nervous system
M. J. Cooke,  K. Vulic and M. S. Shoichet,
Soft Matter, 2010, 6, 4988-4998

Don’t forget if you want to find out about the first Biomaterials Science articles once they’re published online you can sign up for the Biomaterials Science RSS feed or Table of Contents alert.

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Call for Papers: Molecular Design of Biomaterials

Biomaterials Science

Hopefully you’ve already heard about the launch of Biomaterials Science – but if you haven’t Biomaterials Science is an international, high impact journal bringing together the molecular and mesoscopic interactions of biomaterials and their applications. The broad scope of the journal ranges from the fundamental science of biomaterials to their biomedical applications, including the Molecular Design of Biomaterials.

Articles will be free to access* until the end of 2014 giving your article the widest possible audience. We invite you to support Biomaterials Science and not-for-profit publishing by submitting your next article on the Molecular Design of Biomaterials to the journal. Our online submission system is available at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bmsci

Don’t forget to keep up with the latest news from Biomaterials Science you can Like us on Facebook, Follow us on Twitter or sign up for the newsletter.

Sign up for the Biomaterials Science RSS feed or Table of Contents alert to find out about the first articles once they’re published online.

*Individuals can access the content by signing up for an RSC Publishing Personal Account. Existing institutional RSC journal subscribers, with registered IP, have automatic access. Other institutions can register for free access.

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Introducing the Biomaterials Science Editors-in-Chief and Associate Editors…

Phil Messersmith, Editor-in-Chief
Phillip B. Messersmith is a professor of Biomedical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering and Chemical and Biological Engineering at Northwestern University. He earned his B.S. degree in life sciences in 1985 and his Ph.D. degree in materials science and engineering in 1993 from the University of Illinois at Urbana. Dr. Messersmith was a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University from 1993-1994 and a faculty member at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 1994-1997. His research interests include studies of biological adhesives, including mussel adhesive proteins and gecko adhesives, the design of biomimetic adhesive polymers and polymer composites, development of novel biomaterials for regenerative medicine, and antifouling polymer surfaces. His awards and honors include a young investigator award from the Whitaker Foundation, a MERIT award from the National Institutes of Health, and the Langmuir Lecture Award from the American Chemical Society. Dr. Messersmith is a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and of Biomaterials Science and Engineering. Dr. Messersmith is also a member of the editorial/advisory boards of Soft Matter, Nanomedicine, Biointerphases and Biomedical Materials

Norio Nakatsuji, Editor-in-ChiefNorio Nakatsuji, Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Nakatsuji received Doctor of Science in developmental biology from the Graduate School of Science at Kyoto University in 1977. He then spent several years in postdoctoral training at Umea University in Sweden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and George Washington University in USA, and MRC Mammalian Development Unit in UK. He returned to Japan to join the Meiji Institute of Health Science in 1984, and became a professor at National Institute of Genetics in 1991. In 1999, he moved to the newly reorganized Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences at Kyoto University, which is devoted to both basic and application research in regenerative medicine. His main research interests have been developmental biology of mammals focusing on germ cell lineage, nervous systems, and pluripotent stem cells. In 2003, his group succeeded in deriving human embryonic stem (hES) cell lines and distributing them to other scientists. Since 2007, he is the founding director of Kyoto University’s Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), an institute which aims to advance cross-disciplinary research and technological innovation based on cell biology, chemistry and physics. Recently, his research group is focusing on multidisciplinary research using human ES and iPS cells in collaboration with chemical biology and material science groups, which includes development of chemical tools for stem cell control and creation of disease model cells for research and drug discovery.

Jianjun Cheng, Associate EditorJianjun Cheng, Associate Editor
Jianjun Cheng received a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Nankai University, China, in 1993, a M.S. degree in chemistry from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 1996, and a Ph.D. degree in materials science from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2001. From 2001 to 2004, Cheng was a senior scientist and a project leader at Insert Therapeutics, Inc. After working as a postdoctoral fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 2004 to 2005, Cheng joined the faculty of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in 2005.  He is currently an associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and is a faculty affiliate with Department of Chemistry, Department of Bioengineering, the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Genomic Biology, and the Cancer Center of the University of Illinois.  Cheng’s research is focused on design, synthesis and application of polymeric- and nano-biomaterials in drug and gene delivery.  He received a Prostate Cancer Foundation Competitive Award (2007), a National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2008) and a NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (2010).

Matthias LutolfMatthias Lutolf, Associate Editor
Matthias Lutolf is Head of the Laboratory of Stem Cell Bioengineering (LSCB) which belongs to the Institute of Bioengineering at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland. He was trained as a Materials Scientist at ETH Zurich where he also carried out his Ph.D. studies on the development of a novel class of biologically responsive synthetic hydrogels for tissue engineering (2004). In 2005 Lutolf joined the Baxter Laboratory in Stem Cell Biology at Stanford University to work on stem cell biology with Postdoc fellowships from the Swiss National Science Foundation and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. In 2007 Lutolf won a prestigious European Young Investigator (EURYI) award to start up his independent research at EPFL. His work interfaces biomaterials engineering, microfabrication and stem cell biology to elucidate how microenvironmental signals control stem cell fate and to find better means to grow stem cells in-vitro.

Jianjun Cheng, Associate EditorHiroshi Sugiyama, Associate Editor
Hiroshi Sugiyama obtained his PhD in 1984 with Teruo Matuura at Kyoto University. After postdoctoral studies at the University of Virginia with Sidney M. Hecht, he returned to Kyoto University in 1986 as an assistant professor and became an associate professor in Isao Saito group in 1993. He was promoted a full professor of the Institute for Medical and Dental Engineering at Tokyo Medical and Dental University in 1996. He has been a professor of chemistry, in the Graduate School of Science at Kyoto University since 2003.  In 2008 he was appointed as a principle investigator of iCeMS. His research interests involve the bioorganic chemistry of nucleic acids and his research group is defining the chemical principles underlying the recognition, reactivity and structure of nucleic acids. He has been awarded a Nippon IBM award in 1999, and The Creative Work Award of Chemical Society of Japan in 2005.  He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of ChemBioChem (since 2005) and J. Am. Chem. Soc (since 2009).

Don’t forget if you want to find out about the first articles once they’re published online you can sign up for the Biomaterials Science RSS feed or Table of Contents alert.

To keep up with the latest news you can Like us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter or sign up for the Biomaterials Science Newsletter.

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Highlighting the Molecular Design of Biomaterials

Biomaterials Science has a broad scope that covers the fundamental science of biomaterials through to their biomedical applications. We’ll be highlighting different areas of the scope over the next few months and this week its…

Molecular Design of Biomaterials

To celebrate this we’ve made a few articles published in RSC journals free to access for 4 weeks. I hope you enjoy reading them. 

Naoto Saito ,  Kaoru Aoki ,  Yuki Usui ,  Masayuki Shimizu ,  Kazuo Hara ,  Nobuyo Narita ,  Nobuhide Ogihara ,  Koichi Nakamura ,  Norio Ishigaki ,  Hiroyuki Kato ,  Hisao Haniu ,  Seiichi Taruta ,  Yoong Ahm Kim and Morinobu Endo
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2011, 40, 3824-3834

2. Feature Article: A material’s point of view on recent developments of polymeric biomaterials: control of mechanical and biochemical properties
Varvara Gribova ,  Thomas Crouzier and Catherine Picart
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 14354-14366

3. Emerging Area: Emerging area: biomaterials that mimic and exploit protein motion
William L. Murphy
Soft Matter
, 2011, 7, 3679-3688

Cameron P. Brown ,  Federico Rosei ,  Enrico Traversa and Silvia Licoccia
Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 870-876

5. Paper: Tuning the swelling and mechanical properties of pH-responsive doubly crosslinked microgels using particle composition
Ruixue Liu ,  Amir H. Milani ,  Jennifer. M. Saunders ,  Tony J. Freemont and Brian R. Saunders
Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 9297-9306

 Biomaterials Science

Articles in Biomaterials Science will be free to access* until the end of 2014 so they’ll reach the widest possible audience. We hope you’ll support Biomaterials Science by submitting your next article to the journal.

*Individuals can access the content by signing up for an RSC Publishing Personal Account. Existing institutional RSC journal subscribers, with registered IP, have automatic access. Other institutions can register for free access.

Sign up sign up for the Biomaterials Science RSS feed or Table of Contents alert to read the first articles once they’re published online.

To keep up with the latest news you can Like us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter.

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