Author Archive

Magnetic droplets stamp out protein patterns

Droplets rolling across a lotus leaf spark device assembly idea

Scientists from China and Portugal have drawn inspiration from lotus leaves to devise a technique for arranging a wide range of materials, including cells, proteins and quantum dots, on a surface. Their method could be useful for making biomedical devices.

The team, led by Wenlong Song from Jilin University, noticed how water droplets strip dust from lotus leaves when they roll across their superhydrophobic surface. ‘We supposed that if this could be managed by a suitable driving force, it would allow the transfer of water-soluble materials onto the surface,’ explains Song.

They’ve done just that and designed a protein printing method using hydrogel droplets controlled by a magnetic field.

Check out the full story by Charlie Quigg in Chemistry World!


This article is free to access until 24 March 2017

J Wang et al, Biomater. Sci., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c6bm00867d

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2017 Biomaterials Science Lectureship is now open!

Do you know an early-career researcher who deserves recognition for their contribution to the biomaterials field?

Now is your chance to put them forward for the accolade they deserve.

Biomaterials Science is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for its 2017 Lectureship award. This annual award was established in 2014 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the biomaterials field.

Previous winners

2016 – Fan Yang, Stanford University, USA

2015 – Joel Collier, Duke University, USA

2014 – Suzie Pun, University of Washington, USA

Qualification

To be eligible for the Biomaterials Science Lectureship, the candidate should be in the earlier stages of their scientific career, typically within 7 years of attaining their first independent research position, and will have made a significant contribution to the field.

Description

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture three times, one of which will be located in the home country of the recipient. The Biomaterials Science Editorial Office will provide the sum of £1000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The recipient will be presented with the award at one of the three award lectures. They will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased on the back cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Selection

The recipient of the award will be selected and endorsed by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board.

Nominations

Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee, including a brief C.V. (no longer than 2 pages A4) together with a letter (no longer than 2 pages A4) supporting the nomination, to the Biomaterials Science Editorial Office by 27th January 2017. Self-nomination is not permitted.

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Convex and concave micro-structured silicone controls the shape, but not the polarization state of human macrophages

This month’s front cover image comes from Katharina Maniura-Weber et al. from the Biointerfaces lab at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, whose paper looks at how microstructured silicone controls the shape of human macrophages.

Katharina’s lab focuses on novel materials-based healthcare solutions, looking at biointerfaces between biomolecules, their assemblies and water, between cells and extra cellular matrix, between populations of bacteria and human cells and their surroundings and between the biological environment and materials for medical applications.

Read the full article here.

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Drug Delivery Australia 2016

Drug Delivery Australia, hosted by the Australian Chapter of the Controlled Release Society, will hold its annual conference in Sydney 27-28th October 2016

sydney-harbour

Theme: ‘Particles to People’

Dates: Thursday – Friday 27-28th October, 2016

Venue: University of New South Wales

Conference Chair: Patrick Spicer

Conference Dinner: Harbour cruise on Thursday night

Two x $1000 student bursaries for travel to the CRS Annual Meeting in Boston on offer for best poster presentations

Draft Program 12th Oct: Click Here

Accepted Speakers include:

  • International Plenary: Gert Storm (U. Utrecht, Netherlands) “Nanomedicine in the clinic: is targeting our target?”
  • Local Keynote: Martina Stenzel
  • Kris Thurecht (University of Queensland)
  • Nicky Thomas (University of South Australia)
  • David Cipolla (Aradigm, USA)
  • Heather Benson (University of Western Australia)
  • Kara Perrow (University of Wollongong)
  • Mariusz Skwarczynski (University of Queensland)
  • Yousuf Mohammed (University of South Australia)
  • Amirali Popat (University of Queensland)
  • Sophia Gu (University of New South Wales)
  • Hui Xin Ong (University of Sydney)
  • Shakila Rizwan (University of Otago)

Abstract submission is closed

Registration: Click here

Venue and Accommodations: Click Here

Information for delegates: Click Here

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