2019 Biomaterials Science Lectureship awarded to April Kloxin

The Biomaterials Science Lectureship is an annual award that honours an early-career researcher for their significant contribution to the biomaterials field. The recipient is selected by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board from a list of candidates nominated by the community.

Professor April Kloxin This year we are delighted to award the Lectureship to Professor April Kloxin (University of Delaware). She will present her Biomaterials Science lecture and receive her award at the European Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Dresden, Germany in September 2019.

April Kloxin obtained her B.S. (Summa Cum Laude) and M.S. in Chemical Engineering from North Carolina State University and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Colorado, Boulder, as a NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellow.  She trained as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute postdoctoral research associate at the University of Colorado before joining the faculty at the University of Delaware in 2011.

Her group aims to create unique materials with multiscale property control for addressing outstanding problems in human health. Her research currently focuses on the design of responsive biomaterials and development of controlled, dynamic models of disease and regeneration.  Her honors include the ACS PMSE Arthur K. Doolittle Award, a Susan G. Komen Foundation Career Catalyst Research award, a NSF CAREER award, and a Pew Scholars in Biomedical Sciences award.

To learn more about April’s research, have a look at her recent publications in Biomaterials Science and our sister journals:

Designing well-defined photopolymerized synthetic matrices for three-dimensional culture and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells
Elisa M. Ovadia,  David W. Colby  and  April M. Kloxin
Biomater. Sci., 2018,6, 1358-1370

Design of functionalized cyclic peptides through orthogonal click reactions for cell culture and targeting applications (Part of the 2018 ChemComm Emerging Investgators Issue)
 Paige J. LeValley,  Elisa M. Ovadia,  Christopher A. Bresette,  Lisa A. Sawicki,  Emanual Maverakis,  Shi Bai  and  April M. Kloxin 
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 6923-6926

Design of thiol- and light-sensitive degradable hydrogels using Michael-type addition reactions (Part of the 2015 Polymer Chemistry Emerging Investgators Issue)
Prathamesh M. Kharkar,  Kristi L. Kiick  and  April M. Kloxin
Polym. Chem., 2015,6, 5565-5574

Design of thiol–ene photoclick hydrogels using facile techniques for cell culture applications
Lisa A. Sawicki  and  April M. Kloxin
Biomater. Sci., 2014,2, 1612-1626

Hydrogel scaffolds as in vitro models to study fibroblast activation in wound healing and disease
Megan E. Smithmyer,  Lisa A. Sawicki  and  April M. Kloxin 
Biomater. Sci., 2014,2, 634-650

 

Please join us in congratulating April on her award!

 

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Introducing our new Associate Editors Professor Jons Hilborn and Professor Fu-Jian Xu

 

In 2001 Jöns Hilborn was appointed to the head of the Polymer Chemistry program at the Department of Chemistry at Uppsala University in Sweden. He has extensive management experience from life science industry, start-up companies and coordination of European projects.

His research interests are in the design, synthesis and preparation of polymers and specifically materials for tissue scaffolds and as delivery vehicles. His group especially focuses on hydrogel matrices that act on endogenous cells to regenerate tissue. His laboratory combines chemistry, biology, engineering with medicine to bring their research findings from the lab bench to the clinic and commercial applications. He served as president of “Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society” (TERMIS), of which he was a founding member. 

Read some of Jöns recent research in Biomaterials Science: 

Control of growth factor binding and release in bisphosphonate functionalized hydrogels guides rapid differentiation of precursor cells in vitro
Sujit Kootala, Yu Zhang, Sara Ghalib, Vladimir Tolmachev, Jöns Hilborn and Dmitri A. Ossipov
Biomater. Sci., 2016,4, 250-254

In situ forming interpenetrating hydrogels of hyaluronic acid hybridized with iron oxide nanoparticles
Malihe Kheirabadi, Liyang Shi, Reza Bagheri, Kourosh Kabiri, Jöns Hilborn and Dmitri A. Ossipov
Biomater. Sci., 2015,3, 1466-1474

Chondroitin sulfate derived theranostic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery
Oommen P. Varghese, Jianping Liu, Karthi Sundaram, Jöns Hilborn and Oommen P. Oommen
Biomater. Sci., 2016,4, 1310-1313

 

Fu-Jian Xu is a Professor and the executive director of Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials at Beijing University of Chemical Technology. His research interests include functional materials for drug/gene delivery, natural polysaccharides for wound healing, and surface modification for biomedical applications including antibacterial, antifouling, and biocompatible surfaces.

He was the recipient of the Top Young Talents of National Special Support Program (2012), National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (NSFC, 2013), Cheung Kong Distinguished Professor (Ministry of Education of China, 2014), and Distinguished Young Scientists Program of Beijing Universities (2018).

Learn more about Fujian by reading some of his research articles below:

Phthalocyanine functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) nano-assemblies for photodynamic inactivation of bacteria
Wei Tong, Yanhua Xiong, Shun Duan, Xiaokang Ding and Fu-Jian Xu
Biomater. Sci., 2019, Advance Article

Multifunctional hybrids with versatile types of nanoparticles via self-assembly for complementary tumor therapy
Shun Duan, Jia Li, Nana Zhao and Fu-Jian Xu
Nanoscale, 2018, 10, 7649-7657

High-performance cationic polyrotaxanes terminated with polypeptides as promising nucleic acid delivery systems
Hai-Qing Song, Yu Qi, Rui-Quan Li, Gang Cheng, Nana Zhao and Fu-Jian Xu
Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 2281-2289

PGMA-based gene carriers with lipid molecules
Chen Xu, Bingran Yu, Hao Hu, Muhammad Naeem Nizam, Wei Yuan, Jie Ma and Fu-Jian Xu
Biomater. Sci., 2016, 4, 1233-1243

Biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes
Hui Jiang and Fu-Jian Xu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 3394-3426

 

All these articles are currently FREE to read until the 31st May!

 

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Polydopamine coated bimetallic nanoparticles for mitochondria-targeted cancer therapy

Thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine malignancies, and it is the cause of more deaths than all other endocrine cancers combined. Papillary thyroid cancer, a type of thyroid cancer, is often asymptomatic, but because of the progress of modern diagnostic technology its detection rate has shown a rapid increase in the past decade. It has a lower degree of malignancy than that of other types of thyroid cancers and the tumor growth rate is slow, however, it is still very serious as it can develop throughout the thyroid gland and spread extensively in the body, even spreading to distant organs. The conventional method for treating papillary thyroid cancer is surgery, but this comes with a significant risk of injury. Hence, there is a strong need for non-invasive therapeutics which can be used as an alternative to surgery in the treatment of papillary thyroid cancer.

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Recently, mitochondria-targeting nanomaterials have gained major attention as mitochondria are cells’ powerhouse, controls various signaling pathways including apoptosis and necrosis and produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is important to mention that increases ROS can cause the proliferation of cancer cells and drug resistance. In this present work, researchers used a mitochondria-targeted and exocytosis inhibition strategy. They used polydopamine-coated gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (Au-Ag@PDA NPs) to target papillary thyroid cancer cells (TPC-1 cells). In order to understand the nano-bio interactions between the nanoparticles and the cancer cells, the authors systematically studied the endocytosis pathway, the subcellular localization, and the cellular responses to the nanoparticles.

The results showed that:

(i)Au-Ag@PDA NPs were internalized through a caveolae-mediated and macropinocytosis pathway, localized in mitochondria and block exocytosis pathway

(ii) This lead to cell cycle arrest in S-phase and this inhibited the cell proliferation

(iii) The TPC-1 cells can survive by an autophagy-mediated method to escape the apoptosis or necrosis

The researchers, using the mitrochondria targeting behavior of the nanoparticles, then carried out photothermal therapy for the enhanced treatment of the papillary thyroid cancer cells. These findings indicate that PDA-coated inorganic nanoparticles have potential in mitrochondria-targeted cancer treatments and, one day, these could be provide an alternative to surgery for patients suffering from papillary thyroid cancer.

 

Read the full paper for free until the 13th May

Targeting mitochondria with Au–Ag@Polydopamine nanoparticles for papillary thyroid cancer therapy Biomater. Sci., 2019, 7, 1052-1063

 

About the Web/Blog writer:

Dr Sudip MukherjeeDr. Sudip Mukherjee is a Web Writer for Biomaterials Science. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Rice University. His research is involved in the development of advanced nanomaterials for drug/gene delivery in cancer theranostics, immunomodulatory applications & angiogenesis. He published a total of ~35 research articles/patents. He serves as International Advisory Board Member for ‘Materials Research Express‘, IOP Sciences. He is an associate member (AMRSC) of RSC, UK. He serves as reviewer for several international journals like ChemComm, J Mater Chem A, J Mater Chem B, Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, RSC Advances, IOP Nanotechnology, Biofabrication etc.

Contact Email: sudip.mukherjee@rice.edu
Twitter: https://twitter.com/sudip_88

 

 

 

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Outstanding Reviewers for Biomaterials Science in 2018

Outstanding Reviewers for Biomaterials Science in 2018

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Biomaterials Science in 2018, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Jinzhi Du, South China University of Technology ORCiD: 0000-0003-4037-1212

Dr Huile Gao, Sichuan University ORCiD: 0000-0002-5355-7238

Professor Ji Hyun Ryu, Wonkwang University

Dr April Kloxin, University of Delaware ORCiD: 0000-0002-4594-2953

Dr Yuhan Lee, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Dr Yang Li, Harvard Medical School ORCiD: 0000-0001-8186-2435

Dr Gang Liu, Xiamen University ORCiD: 0000-0003-2613-7286

Professor Xintao Shuai, Sun Yat-Sen University ORCiD: 0000-0003-4271-0310

Dr Tianmeng Sun, Jilin University ORCiD: 0000-0003-2261-4532

Professor Xian-Zhu Yang, South China University of Technology

We would also like to thank the Biomaterials Science board and the biomaterials research community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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TERMIS EU 2019

Tissue Engineering Therapies: From Concept to Clinical Translation & Commercialisation

The TERMIS-EU 2019 meeting is to be held from the 27th to the 31st of May 2019 in Rhodes, Greece. The theme of the meeting is ‘Tissue Engineering Therapies: From concept to clinical translation and commercialisation’.

The programme of the TERMIS EU 2019 will include specific workshops and symposia in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine tools, technologies and discoveries; clinical trials; regulatory approval of new devices; scaling up; commercialisation; career development of young investigators; women leadership and representation; education; and outreach.

Standard registration is open throughout February.

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Biomaterials Science Prizes awarded at 3rd Biomaterials Discovery Workshop

The Third Annual Biomaterials Discovery Workshop took place on Wednesday 16th January at the University of Nottingham. The event was attended by Biomaterials Science Editorial Board member Professor Morgan Alexander and Biomaterials Science was pleased to sponsor two prizes.

 

The prize winners were

1st Place – Alessandra Travanut

2nd Place – Jennifer Ashworth

Congratulations to both winners!

 

Biomaterials Discovery

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Profile: Matt Webber, 2017 Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigator

Profile: Matt Webber, 2017 Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigator

This week’s issue of Biomaterials Science is our 2019 Emerging Investigators issue, which contains reviews and research articles from biomaterials scientists in the early stages of their independent careers. The 2019 Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigators were individually nominated by members of the journal Editorial and Advisory Boards, and previous Emerging Investigators, in recognition of their potential to influence future directions in the biomaterials field. The issue is accompanied by an Editorial from Editor-in-Chief Jennifer Elisseeff, which discusses some of the great work on display, and contains biographies and photos of the contributors.

In order to celebrate this issue, we are delighted to feature a profile of one of the researchers from our 2017 Emerging Investigators issue, Matt Webber. Matt talks below about how his research has progressed since being featured as a Biomaterials Science Emerging Investigator.

“It was a great honor to have been included as a 2017 Emerging Investigator. When I was selected for this honor, my team had not even moved into our lab space and I had just started my independent position. I was surprised people even knew who I was, but of course I accepted! We had access to a peptide synthesizer, and went about devising a project that would be possible to complete on a short timeline with limited resources. We begun by investigating the self-assembly of a series of tripeptides, which we designed to be amphiphilic with a variable residue positioned in the center of an aromatic group and a charged group. We thought some sequences might self-assemble, but in a stroke of pure serendipity we were fortunate to discover the emergence of 5 unique nanostructures from these five different sequences. This was very exciting, leading my group to continue to explore the self-assembly of minimal peptide sequences. This initial work published in Biomaterials Science resulted in a follow-up paper published in 2018 in Soft Matter and several other forthcoming works and invited presentations. Strangely enough, we may never have done this work or pursued this line of research if it were not for the opportunity to participate in the 2017 Emerging Investigator issue. I am grateful to Biomaterials Science for this honor, and for nucleating a great start to my research group.”

 

Biography
Matthew J. Webber is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, with a concurrent appointment in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. His research group is interested in applying supramolecular principles, leveraging defined and rationally designed non-covalent interactions, to improve therapeutic materials. He is specifically curious about the use of supramolecular design to overcome barriers in drug delivery and improve biomedical materials. Prof. Webber received a BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame, and MS and PhD degrees in Biomedical Engineering from Northwestern University. His dissertation, performed in the laboratory of Prof. Samuel Stupp, focused on the use supramolecular peptide assemblies for cardiovascular disease therapeutics. Subsequently, he was an NIH NRSA postdoctoral fellow in the laboratories of Prof. Robert Langer and Prof. Daniel Anderson at MIT, working on the development of new molecular engineering approaches toward the treatment of diabetes. His research passion is to contribute to bringing the field of Supramolecular Therapeutics into prominence. He has authored 56 peer-reviewed papers and is inventor on 7 pending or awarded patents. In 2017, he was named by Biomaterials Science as an Emerging Investigator and by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) as one of the “35 under 35” young leaders shaping the field.

Matt’s papers will be free to access on our publishing platform for 6 weeks.

We hope you enjoy reading all the contributions to our 2019 Emerging Investigators collection, and we thank all the nominators and authors for their input.

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Paper of the month: Magnetic delivery of Fe3O4@polydopamine nanoparticle-loaded natural killer cells suggest a promising anticancer treatment

Written by web writer Muhammad Ovais

Natural killer (NK) cells have the intrinsic ability to recognise and eliminate cancer cells along with the potential to inhibit metastasis. NK cells utilize a variety of ways to kill tumor cells, such as stimulating cytokine release, direct cytotoxicity and activating targeted cells apoptosis. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has shown significant response to NK cell based immunotherapy in clinical settings. Recently, researchers have begun investigating ways to augment the recruitment and infiltration of NK cells into tumors for improved theranostics. Hence, it is vital to develop non-invasive methods for in vivo control and for the monitoring of the administered NK cells with tissue targeting ability. FDA approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have been proven biocompatible delivery vehicles and imaging probes for NK cells.

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In the present work Jiang et al have synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) composed of a Fe3O4 core and polydopamine (PDA) shell, for tumor theranostics. The aim of this study was to develop magnetic NPs for an immune-cell delivery system to target NSCLC cells. The system stimulated the accumulation of NK cells at the tumor site via the placement of a tiny external magnetic device inside animals. The NK cells actively took up the Fe3O4@PDA NPs due to its physiological stability, while the biology of NK cells was not affected, owing to its biocompatible nature. In vivo studies demonstrated the reduced expression of Ki-67 and the elevated apoptosis of A549 cancer cells upon treatment with Fe3O4@PDA NP-labeled NK cells. Though there are some limitations associated with the invasive approach, the magnetic delivery of NP-NKs can be of promising value in clinical applications.

Tips/comments from the authors:

  • Coating of magnetic NPs with PDA played a vital role in its cellular uptake, as surface modification is an essential factor in the determination of the biocompatibility and the cellular absorption of magnetic NPs.
  • Due to the biocompatible nature of magnetic NPs, even high concentrations (100 μg/mL) did not induce apoptosis of NK cells.
  • With improved retention over time the delivery of Fe3O4@PDA NP-labeled NK cells can be expedited to the tumor via application of local magnetic field.
  • The position of the tumor and the implanted magnetic field should be close enough, while sufficient time should be given to the magnetic field for the achievement of potent therapeutic effect.
  • The non-invasive nature of three-dimensional (3-D) rotating magnetic fields or high gradient magnetic fields can enhance the magnetic strength in a central point for the effective accumulation of NPs.

 

Read the full article here: Magnetic delivery of Fe3O4@polydopamine nanoparticle-loaded natural killer cells suggest a promising anticancer treatment Biomater. Sci., 2018,6, 2714-2725

 

About the web writer

Muhammad OvaisMuhammad Ovais is a Web Writer for Biomaterials Science. Currently, he is a PhD candidate in Prof. Chunying Chen Lab at CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), Beijing. His research interest lies in the development of novel nano-delivery systems for cancer immunotherapy. He has published a total of ~30 research/review articles. You can find or contact him on ResearchGate, LinkedIn and Chunying Chen’s lab

Contact Email: movais@bs.qau.edu.pk

Twitter: https://twitter.com/OVAISBiotec

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Sericin hydrogels promote skin wound healing

Severe skin injuries affect millions of patients each year worldwide. These lead to serious issues, such as the formation of nonfunctional large scar tissue and the loss of skin appendages (such as hair follicles and sebaceous glands; etc). This can cause the patients insufferable bodily discomfort and a poor quality of life. Current available treatments include autologous skin grafting, allotransplantation and artificial skin substitutes. However, it remains very challenging to functionally regenerate skin tissue after severe loss of the epidermis and dermis. Other limitations include the lack of donor skin, costly medical expenses, the chance of immune-rejection and unsatisfactory skin regeneration. Hence, the development of an efficient alternative skin substitute is highly desired.

10.1039/C8BM00934A

Sericin is a natural biomaterial derived from silk cocoons has been used previously for a variety of types of injury repair. Previously, Wang and coworkers utilized sericin made hydrogels or scaffolds for transected sciatic nerve regeneration, repair of ischemic stroke, and cartilage regeneration. In this present work, a photo-crosslinkable sericin hydrogel (SMH) for the repair of scarless skin and sebaceous glands regeneration is reported. The sericin hydrogel promotes such regeneration by the following mechanisms: (a) effective inhibition of inflammation; (b) promotion of angiogenesis by stimulating the growth factors like VEGF and EGF; (c) reduction of scar formation through regulating the expressions of TGF-β1 and TGF-β3; and (d) effective conscription of stem cells to injury sites, where they differentiate and regenerate into skin appendages. Overall, these results showcase the potential of this innovative bimodal tool for the development of new artificial skin substitutes for the clinical treatment of severe skin injuries.

Read the full article for free until 19th November

Sericin hydrogels promote skin wound healing with effective regeneration of hair follicles and sebaceous glands after complete loss of epidermis and dermis  Biomater. Sci., 2018, Advance Article DOI: 10.1039/C8BM00934A.

 

 

About the webwriter
Dr Sudip MukherjeeDr. Sudip Mukherjee is a Web Writer for Biomaterials Science. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Rice University. His research is involved in the development of advanced nanomaterials for drug/gene delivery in cancer theranostics, immunomodulatory applications & angiogenesis. He published a total of ~35 research articles/patents. He serves as International Advisory Board Member for ‘Materials Research Express‘, IOP Sciences. He is an associate member (AMRSC) of RSC, UK. He serves as reviewer for several international journals like ChemComm, J Mater Chem A, J Mater Chem B, Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, RSC Advances, IOP Nanotechnology, Biofabrication etc.

Contact Email: sudip.mukherjee@rice.edu

Twitter: https://twitter.com/sudip_88

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Nominations open for the 2019 Biomaterials Science Lectureship

Do you know an early-career researcher who deserves recognition for their contribution to the biomaterials field?

Now is your chance to put them forward for the accolade they deserve!

Biomaterials Science is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for its 2019 Lectureship award. This annual award was established in 2014 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the biomaterials field.

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture at the 2019 European Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting, where they will also be presented with the award. The Biomaterials Science Editorial Office will provide financial support to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased free of charge on the front cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Prof Zhen Gu (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University)

Zhen Gu, winner of the 2018 Biomaterials Science Lectureship, receives his certificate from Executive Editor Neil Hammond

 

Previous winners

2018 – Zhen Gu, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill & North Carolina State University, USA

2017 – Zhuang Liu, Soochow University, China

2016 – Fan Yang, Stanford University, USA

2015 – Joel Collier, Duke University, USA

2014 – Suzie Pun, University of Washington, USA

Eligibility

To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates should meet the following criteria:

  • Be an independent researcher, having completed PhD and postdoctoral studies
  • Be actively pursuing research within the biomaterials field, and have made a significant contribution to the field
  • Be at an early stage of their independent career (this should be within 12 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break, for example for childcare leave, or followed an alternative study path)

Although the Biomaterials Science Lectureship doesn’t explicitly reward support of or contributions to the journal, candidates with no history of either publishing in or refereeing for the journal would typically not be considered.

Selection

  • Eligible nominated candidates will be notified of their nomination, and will be asked to provide 3 recent articles that they feel represent their current research.
  • All eligible nominated candidates will be assessed by a shortlisting panel, made up of members of the Biomaterials Science Advisory Board and a previous lectureship winner.
  • The shortlisting panel will consider the articles provided by the candidates as well as their CVs and letters of nomination.
  • Shortlisted candidates will be further assessed by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board, and a winner will be selected based on an anonymous poll.
  • Selection is not based simply on quantitative measures. Consideration will be given to all information provided in the letter of recommendation and candidate CV, including research achievements and originality, contributions to the biomaterials community, innovation, collaborations and teamwork, publication history, and engagement with Biomaterials Science.

Nominations

  • Nominations must be made via email to biomaterialsscience-rsc@rsc.org, and should include a short CV and a brief letter of nomination
  • Self-nomination is not permitted
  • Nominators do not need to be senior researchers, and we encourage nominations from people at all career levels
  • As part of the Royal Society of Chemistry, we believe we have a responsibility to promote inclusivity and accessibility in order to improve diversity. Where possible, we encourage each nominator to consider nominating candidates of all genders, races, and backgrounds.
  • Candidates outside of the stated eligibility criteria may still be considered
  • Nomination letters should be up to 1 page in length. They should particularly highlight contributions that the nominee has made to the field as an independent researcher, and any career breaks or alternative career paths that should be taken into consideration by the judging panel. Nomination of one candidate by multiple people in the same letter is accepted

 

Nominations should be submitted no later than 19th December 2018.

 

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