Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Bioanalytical sensors for real world applications- themed collection open for submissions

 

Analytical Methods has launched a themed collection focusing on bioanalytical sensors for real world applications.

This collection aims to publish papers in which sensors have been used to measure analytes in complex matrices, using robust technologies and with high sensitivity and specificity. The scope of this collection is intentionally broad to cover a broad range of applications both biomedical and environmental. Work which describes challenges in sensing of complex analytes or sensing analytes in complex matrices and how these challenges have been overcome is particularly welcome.

 

 

 

Guest Editors 

This collection is co-guest edited by Assistant Professor Charlie Mace (Tufts University, USA), Dr Aoife Morrin (Dublin City University, Ireland) and Associate Professor Rebecca Whelan (University of Notre Dame, USA).

Charlie Mace                                                  Aoife Morrin                                                     Rebecca Whelan

 

Submission deadline: 31st December 2019

 

Contribute to this collection

We welcome submissions of original research and review articles. Articles will be added to the collection as they are accepted and the resulting issue will benefit from extensive promotion.

About Analytical Methods

Guided by Editor-in-Chief Scott Martin and an international team of Associate Editors and Editorial Board members, Analytical Methods welcomes early applications of new analytical methods and technology demonstrating potential for societal impact. The journal requires that methods and technology reported in the journal are sufficiently innovative, robust, accurate, and compared to other available methods for the intended application. Developments with interdisciplinary approaches are particularly welcome. Systems should be proven with suitably complex and analytically challenging samples. For more information about the journal or its scope, please visit the journal website.

 

Interested in contributing?

Email methods-rsc@rsc.org

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Emerging Investigators Series – Alexander Zestos

We are delighted to introduce our latest Analytical Methods Emerging Investigator, Alexander Zestos!

Alexander Zestos is a Greek-American from Williamsburg, VA. He completed a BS/MS degree in Chemistry from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA in 2008. There, he performed research with Dr. William H. Starnes, Jr. on the use of metal-clay additives and ester thiols to promote the smoke suppression, fire retrardance, and thermal stability of poly(vinyl chloride). He completed his PhD in Chemistry in 2014 at the University of Virginia, where he worked with Dr. Jill Venton and investigated the use of alternative carbon nanomaterials for enhanced neurochemical detection using fast scan cyclic voltammetry. From 2014-2017, he was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology at the University of Michigan and was co-mentored by Professors Robert T. Kennedy and Margaret E. Gnegy. There, he developed microdialysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assays to measure neurochemical dynamics in rats after the administration of amphetamine and cocaine. He also developed the use of protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors as novel therapeutics for amphetamine abuse in addition to measuring acetylcholine release from beige fat adipocytes and the neurochemical biomarkers of epileptic seizures. Since 2017, he is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Center for Behavioral Neuroscience at American University in Washington, D.C., where he develops electrochemical methods and electrode materials to enhance neurotransmitter detection for a wide variety of applications.

Read Alexander’s Emerging Investigator series paper “Polymer modified carbon fiber-microelectrodes and waveform modifications enhance neurotransmitter metabolite detection” and find out more about him in the interview below:

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on carbon-fiber microelectrodes and waveform modifications for the detection of neurotransmitter metabolites. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?
My research has evolved greatly over time. As a BS/MS student at the College of William and Mary, I investigated the development of smoke suppressants, fire retardants, and thermal stabilizers for poly(vinyl chloride). As a PhD student at the University of Virginia, I became more interested in research that could be used for biomedical applications. I utilized alternative carbon nanomaterials as electrodes for enhanced neurochemical detection with fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). As a postdoctoral research fellow in the Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology at the University of Michigan, I used in vivo microdialysis coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to detect multiple neurotransmitters in vivo and measure the effects of PKC inhibitors on amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux. We were able to measure over 30 neurochemicals simultaneously in freely behaving animals, which had many applications for studying drugs of abuse, obesity, and epilepsy. At American University, I am combining the use of voltammetry, HPLC, and other methods to enhance neurochemical detection that is applicable to studying the effects of many drugs and behavioural states.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
I am excited by many projects. Currently, we are developing methods of neurochemical enhancement with carbon fiber-microelectrodes to study neurochemical dynamics in diabetic zebrafish and the effect of cathinone bath salts in rats. Moreover, we are also using carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube yarns and polymer coatings to enhance neurochemical sensitivity, temporal resolution, and promote anti-fouling properties. My research continues to be at the interface of materials science, analytical measurements, and biomedical applications.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for developing novel electrode materials and waveforms for the detection of biomolecules?
The key design considerations for developing novel electrode materials and waveforms are to tune the electrode material selectively to each respective analyte. For this paper, we applied positively charged polymer coatings and removed the negative holding potential in order to enhance DOPAC detection, which is negatively charged at a physiological pH. The detection of other analytes such as dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, and others can be enhanced with other coatings and waveform modifications that are specific to each neurotransmitter being detected taking into account size, charge, chemical structure, and other considerations.

What do you find most challenging about your research?
In my opinion, the most challenging part of my research is continuous trial and error and overall complexity. However, this can also be the most rewarding aspect of research when an unexpected discovery is made. Reproducibility is also key in making and testing microelectrodes to measure neurochemical dynamics in small brain regions.

How do you spend your spare time?
I enjoy the outdoors, sports, traveling, and spending time with my family.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?
I most likely would be a physician or diplomat. I always considered myself to by a people-person and enjoy traveling, which is a big part of being a scientist.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?
I would recommend pursuing your passion, yet being able to adapt to new circumstances, and to be continually persistent in your work. There will always be ups and downs in your research, but it is important to remain focused on the long-term goals of your career.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Analytical Methods revised scope description

The scope of Analytical Methods has been revised to highlight that the journal welcomes early applications of new analytical methods and technology demonstrating potential for societal impact.

“Analytical Methods requires that methods and technology reported in the journal are sufficiently innovative, robust, accurate, and compared to other available methods for the intended application. Developments with interdisciplinary approaches are particularly welcome. Systems should be proven with suitably complex and analytically challenging samples.

We encourage developments within, but not limited to, the following technologies and applications:

  • global health, point-of-care and molecular diagnostics
  • biosensors and bioengineering
  • drug development and pharmaceutical analysis
  • applied microfluidics and nanotechnology
  • omics studies, such as proteomics, metabolomics or glycomics
  • environmental, agricultural and food science
  • neuroscience
  • biochemical and clinical analysis
  • forensic analysis
  • industrial process and method development”

The updates relate to the need for systems to be proven with suitably complex and analytically challenging samples and we also highlight some of the technologies and applications that the journal is interested in.

A final update is that the previous requirement for a societal impact statement has now been removed and this will be replaced by a requirement for a short (1-2 sentences long) significance statement for authors to highlight the technological advance and/or significance of the methods and applications in each submitted manuscript.

Any queries regarding these changes should be directed to the Analytical Methods Editorial Office at methods-rsc@rsc.org. 

Submit your next manuscript to Analytical Methods!

 

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Emerging Investigator Series – Charles Mace

We are delighted to introduce our latest Analytical Methods Emerging Investigator, Charles Mace!

Dr Charles Mace earned his BS from Le Moyne College in 2003, followed by an MS (2006) and PhD (2008) from the University of Rochester in the laboratory of Prof. Benjamin Miller. He was then a postdoctoral scholar in the laboratory of Prof. George Whitesides at Harvard University from 2008–2011. Prior to joining the faculty at Tufts in 2013, he was a senior scientist at Diagnostics For All. Charlie is the Vice Chair for the upcoming 2020 Gordon Research Conference on Bioanalytical Sensors.

 

Read Charles’s Emerging Investigator series paper “Determination of sample stability for whole blood parameters using formal experimental design” and find out more about him in the interview below:

 

 

 

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on determination of sample stability for whole blood parameters. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?
Whether you’re asking about my first article as a graduate student or as PI, I have been fortunate to have a consistent scientific narrative in my career—creating technologies that can lead to improved access to healthcare. In graduate school at the University of Rochester, I developed a label-free, optical biosensor platform that I was applying to, among other things, characterizing the immune response to flu infections to help create improved vaccines. My first article on that technology described a sensor to detect pathogenic E. coli. In comparison to what my lab at Tufts University works on now (paper-based microfluidic devices), it was all very high tech. My first independent article described a new paper-based device architecture that could be used to perform immunoassays. It can be thought of as being analogous to a lateral flow test, but something that could be integrated more readily into the kinds of point-of-care hematology devices that we are pursuing. Some of that work is seen in this article.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?
Can I say everything? I’m like a kid in a candy store when it comes to the research that is going on in our lab right now. We have projects related to point-of-care diagnostics, tissue engineering, materials science, and more. We are very collaborative with groups at Tufts and other universities and institutions, and we like being able to bring our expertise to many different areas of research. Being able to jump back and forth between these projects (and support and mentor the students leading these efforts) keeps my enthusiasm level high on a day-to-day basis. Ultimately, it is a major goal of my independent career to develop something “real” — an assay or device that other people can actually use. I think that we are close to that goal on multiple fronts.

In your opinion, what are the key design considerations for developing diagnostic assays for biological parameters?
We like to start with the end goal in mind: what does the user need? This answer is partly related to typical parameters like the desired sensitivity and specificity of the assay, but includes a number of other concerns too. Costs are always an obvious issue when the assay is intended for use in limited-resource settings. While we try to be as economical as possible, academics are actually really bad at estimating what the price of a test will be from the costs required to develop them. A consideration that we have been really focusing on lately is how devices will be used. For example, we try to understand how to increase the capabilities of our devices to make them easier to use and minimize the number of steps a user will need to perform to conduct the test. Not only are those concerns practical and driven by conversations with potential users, but they also end up generating interesting research ideas.

What do you find most challenging about your research?
Blood is deceptively difficult to handle and analyze, which is unlike other biofluids that I have studied in the past like serum, oral fluid, or urine. Blood is a dynamic, living sample whose properties change over time. Understanding these challenges and identifying strategies to effectively account for them are the first steps to developing assays or devices to analyze blood. Particularly with our goals to create point-of-care hematology tests, like with our paper-based hematocrit assay, having a sample that was varying over time could influence how we interpret results and make experimental decisions. Since we need large volumes of blood to develop tests, we mainly rely on local vendors to supply our blood. It’s very fresh, but not “fingerstick” fresh. We would require many many fingers to support our work! Honestly, that was the genesis of this manuscript. Lara (the first author on this paper) identified a problem that could affect her research objectives, devised a plan to understand the variables leading to instability of her blood samples, and demonstrated their impact in a clear way. These are challenges worth solving because the impact of this kind of point-of-care device could be felt worldwide. We have to get a lot of things right at this stage of the research.

How do you spend your spare time?
These days, my main hobbies are chasing around my toddler, teaching him proper animal noises (he’s nailed bear and whale, but can’t quite get sheep), and going to swim class with him. In our quieter moments at night, my wife and I really enjoy cooking together. Sometimes, we will even make competitions out of it by limiting ingredients or forcing together certain combinations of ingredients. It’s a different way of being creative, lets us try new foods, and it helps us share a common passion. Watching reruns of The Office (American version!) for the fifth time is also a common passion.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?
I actually started college with the goal of becoming a high school history teacher. Even though those plans changed really quickly, teaching and communicating have always been passions of mine. That being said, I would probably start a microbrewery with my wife that made great IPAs and tater tots.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?
I love this job and it is ultimately very rewarding, but it can be difficult, overwhelming, and potentially even lonely at times. That is particularly true when you are just starting out and trying to find your voice. Surround yourself with colleagues and mentors that can provide support and guidance. And remember to willingly offer that support to others! You don’t need to go through it alone just to prove your ‘independence’. This is just as true for graduate students as it is seasoned PIs.

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

9th International Symposium on Enabling Technologies

The 9th International Symposium on Enabling Technologies is due to be held from 4th – 5th May, 2017, in Ottawa, Canada.

For 2017, ETP and the Canadian Society for Mass Spectrometry (CSMS) are working together to bringing sponsors and delegates an exciting new program featuring topics relating to: Native MS, MS in medicine, Imaging Advances, Ion Mobility Advances.

Members of CSMS will receive a discount on registrations fees.

Spanning across a packed two days, the 9th International Symposium on Enabling Technologies will include a multitude of distinguished speakers. There is also a poster competitions, with free one year Analytst and Analytical Methods subscriptions up for grabs.

Click here for full programme

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Open Access papers in Analytical Methods

We are very pleased to share with you below some of the latest Open Access papers published in Analytical Methods that may be of interest to you. These research papers are free to access for all – we hope you enjoy reading them.

Grzegorz Boczkaj, Patrycja Makoś and Andrzej Przyjazny
Anal. Methods, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AY03043A, Paper

Neus Fabregat-Cabello, Jorge Pitarch-Motellón, Juan V. Sancho, María Ibáñez and Antoni Francesc Roig-Navarro
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 2895-2903
DOI: 10.1039/C6AY00221H, Paper

Adam Cawley, Daniel Pasin, Namuun Ganbat, Laura Ennis, Corrine Smart, Candace Greer, John Keledjian, Shanlin Fu and Alex Chen
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 1789-1797
DOI: 10.1039/C6AY00156D, Paper

Li Cui, Holly J. Butler, Pierre L. Martin-Hirsch and Francis L. Martin
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 481-487
DOI: 10.1039/C5AY02638E, Communication

F. Rauh and B. Mizaikoff
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 2164-2169
DOI: 10.1039/C5AY02874D, Paper

Janja Vidmar, Radmila Milačič, Viviana Golja, Saša Novak and Janez Ščančar
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 1194-1201
DOI: 10.1039/C5AY03305E, Technical Note

Friedrich Schuler, Clara Siber, Sebastian Hin, Simon Wadle, Nils Paust, Roland Zengerle and Felix von Stetten
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 2750-2755
DOI: 10.1039/C6AY00600K, Paper

J. R. Buser, X. Zhang, S. A. Byrnes, P. D. Ladd, E. K. Heiniger, M. D. Wheeler, J. D. Bishop, J. A. Englund, B. Lutz, B. H. Weigl and P. Yager
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 2880-2886
DOI: 10.1039/C6AY00107F, Paper

Fahmina Fardus-Reid, John Warren and Adam Le Gresley
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 2013-2019
DOI: 10.1039/C6AY00111D, Paper

Marek Tobiszewski
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 2993-2999
DOI: 10.1039/C6AY00478D, Critical Review

S. H. Holm, J. P. Beech, M. P. Barrett and J. O. Tegenfeldt
Anal. Methods, 2016, 8, 3291-3300
DOI: 10.1039/C6AY00443A, Paper
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Hot articles in Analytical Methods

Take a look at our recent HOT Analytical Methods articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

Graphical Abstract

A fast and highly sensitive method for the detection of canine distemper virus by naked eye
Caroline R. Basso, Claudia C. Tozato, João Pessoa A. Junior and Valber A. Pedrosa
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 2264-2267
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02644F

Simple one-step preconcentration and cleanup with micellar system for high performance liquid chromatography determination of pyrethroids in traditional Chinese medicine
Ligang Chen and Wenjuan Xing
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 1691-1700
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02553A

Ammonium salting out extraction with analyte preconcentration for sub-part per billion quantitative analysis in surface, ground and drinking water by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry
Sergio C. Nanita, Laura G. Kaldon and David L. Bailey
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 2300-2312
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02620A

A chronopotentiometric flow injection system for aptasensing of E. coli O157
Jiahong Lei, Jiawang Ding and Wei Qin
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 825-829
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02662D

Combining a Portable, Tandem Mass Spectrometer with Automated Library Searching – An Important Step Towards Streamlined, On-Site Identification of Forensic Evidence
Adam E. O’Leary, Herbert Oberacher, Seth E. Hall and Christopher C. Mulligan
Anal. Methods, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02778G

Portable Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) Technique for the Non-invasive Identification of Canvas Ground: IR Spectra Reference Collection
M. Manfredi, E. Barberis, A. Rava, E. Robotti, F. Gosetti and E. Marengo
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 2313-2322
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02006E


Graphical AbstractThe application of high resolution diffusion NMR for the characterisation and quantification of small molecules in saliva/dentifrice slurries
.
Adam Le Gresley, Emma Simpson, Alex J. Sinclair, Neil Williams, Gary R. Burnett, Dave J. Bradshaw and Robert A. Lucas
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 2323-2332
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02681K

Amino Acid Composition of Human Scalp Hair as a Biometric Classifier and Investigative Lead
Ayat H. B. Rashaid, Peter B. Harrington and Glen P. Jackson
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 1707-1718
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02588A

Rapid and sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium using aptamer conjugated carbon dots as fluorescence probe
Renjie Wang, Yi Xu, Tao Zhang and Yan Jiang
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 1701-1706
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02880E

Rapid assay of neopterin and biopterin in urine by wooden-tip electrospray ionization mass spectrometry
Anal. Methods, 2015, 7, 2913-2916
DOI: 10.1039/C5AY00004A
Bi-cheng Yang, Fa-ying Liu, Jiu-bai Guo, Lei Wan, Juan Wu, Feng Wang, Huai Liu and Ou-ping Huang

Improved Monitoring of P. aeruginosa on Agar Plates
T. A. Webster, H. J. Sismaet, A. F. Sattler and E. D. Goluch
Anal. Methods, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02794A

Binding interaction between prazosin and a1A-adrenoceptor: Investigation on the thermodynamic behaviours and the binding mechanism by high performance affinity chromatography
Jing Wang, Qian Li, Lingjian Yang, Yajun Zhang, Jie Yu, Xinfeng Zhao, Jianbin Zheng, Youyi Zhang and Xiaohui Zheng
Anal. Methods, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY03046J

Characteristics Region Extraction of Time Series Three-dimensional Fluorescence Spectroscopy
Shaohui Yu, Xue Xiao, Nanjing Zhao and Jisheng Yang
Anal. Methods, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY02984D

Analysis of fatty acids and triacylglycerides by Pd nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry
Yuliya E. Silina, Claudia Fink-Straube, Heiko Hayen and Dietrich A. Volmer
Anal. Methods, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AY00705D

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Top ten most accessed Analytical Methods articles from April to June 2014

During the months April – June 2014, the most downloaded Analytical Methods articles were:

Principal component analysis
Rasmus Bro and Age K. Smilde
Anal. Methods, 2014, 6, 2812-2831
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41907J

Fluorescence spectroscopy and multi-way techniques. PARAFAC
Kathleen R. Murphy, Colin A. Stedmon, Daniel Graeber and Rasmus Bro
Anal. Methods, 2013, 5, 6557-6566 
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41160E

Fluorescence turn-off detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose directly using carbon nanodots as probes
Jianfei Wei, Li Qiang, Jun Ren, Xiangling Ren, Fangqiong Tang and Xianwei Meng
Anal. Methods, 2014, 6, 1922-1927
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41837E

Nanoparticles: a global vision. Characterization, separation, and quantification methods. Potential environmental and health impact
Ana López-Serrano, Riansares Muñoz Olivas, Jon Sanz Landaluze and Carmen Cámara
Anal. Methods, 2014, 6, 38-56 
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY40517F

Let there be chip—towards rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices: one-step manufacturing processes
Ansgar Waldbaur, Holger Rapp, Kerstin Länge and Bastian E. Rapp
Anal. Methods, 2011, 3, 2681-2716
DOI: 10.1039/C1AY05253E

Photocatalytic reduction of CO2: a brief review on product analysis and systematic methods
Jindui Hong, Wei Zhang, Jia Ren and Rong Xu
Anal. Methods, 2013, 5, 1086-1097
DOI: 10.1039/C2AY26270C
 

The Folin–Ciocalteu assay revisited: improvement of its specificity for total phenolic content determination
Juan Carlos Sánchez-Rangel, Jorge Benavides, J. Basilio Heredia, Luis Cisneros-Zevallos and Daniel A. Jacobo-Velázquez
Anal. Methods, 2013, 5, 5990-5999
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41125G

Rhodamine and BODIPY chemodosimeters and chemosensors for the detection of Hg2+, based on fluorescence enhancement effects
M. J. Culzoni, A. Muñoz de la Peña, A. Machuca, H. C. Goicoechea and R. Babiano
Anal. Methods, 2013, 5, 30-49
DOI: 10.1039/C2AY25769F

Quantification of a-polylysine: a comparison of four UV/Vis spectrophotometric methods
Andrea Grotzky, Yuichi Manaka, Sara Fornera, Martin Willeke and Peter Walde
Anal. Methods, 2010, 2, 1448-1455
DOI: 10.1039/C0AY00116C
 

OpenFluor– an online spectral library of auto-fluorescence by organic compounds in the environment
Kathleen R. Murphy, Colin A. Stedmon, Philip Wenig and Rasmus Bro
Anal. Methods, 2014, 6, 658-661
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41935E

Interesting read? Please share your thoughts below!

And remember, you can submit direct to Analytical Methods here

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Probing tissue calcifications for cancer

The presence of calcifications is an early indicator of breast cancer and is detected using a mammography to diagnose the disease. However, both malignant and benign tissues present these calcifications, and the small chemical differences in both cases have been difficult to distinguish. Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to study these differences, but the difficulty arises in trying to locate them deep in tissue.

Researchers in the UK at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Cranfield University and the University of Exeter compared micro CT and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in locating calcifications embedded within wax biopsy tissue samples. Both techniques successfully located calcifications, and CT had some advantages in resolution, speed and depth. Furthermore, typical collection, such as the dyes used in histological staining can affect the collected spectra. An alternative method such as CT coupled with spectroscopy could potentially find calcifications and detect cancer.

To read more about this study, click the link below which is free until April 19th.

Locating microcalcifications in breast histopathology sections using micro CT and XRF mapping
Robert Scott, Catherine Kendall, Nicholas Stone and Keith Rogers
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY42158A

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Geological technique adapted to analyse Aboriginal Australian objects

Australian scientists have used a device initially designed for the mining industry to analyse the mineral content of pigments on wooden objects of cultural significance.

Aboriginal Australian people use mineral pigments such as kaolinite and hematite to decorate wood, bark, resin and other organic substances. The analysis of these materials in a non-destructive way can be extremely challenging. In objects with elaborate designs, what is needed is a technique that can analyse point-by-point and map out the pigments on the surface of the object.

To read the full article by Rebecca Brodie, please visit Chemistry World.

HyLogger™ near-infrared spectral analysis: a non-destructive mineral analysis of Aboriginal Australian objects
Rachel S. Popelka-Filcoff, Alan Mauger, Claire E. Lenehan, Keryn Walshe and Allan Pring
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 1309-1316
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41436A, Paper

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)