Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Simple polymer tongue can taste the difference

Scientists in Germany have designed a simple polymer that can be used in a sensor to distinguish between similar fruit juices.

Sensors that analyse food, drink and drugs are important for quality control and preventing fraud. Chemo-optical sensors, or tongues, already exist for testing wine, coffee, whiskey and other beverages. Due to the complex nature of these samples, the tongues comprise a number of sensors, which undergo structural changes to provide a colour or fluorescence pattern in the presence of various analytes. Chemometric techniques then analyse the pattern, reporting the distinct ‘taste’ for each product.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>

This paper is free to access until 5th April, 2017:

Poly(p-phenyleneethynylene)-based tongues discriminate fruit juices
Jinsong Han, Benhua Wang, Markus Bender, Kai Seehafera and Uwe H.F. Bunz
Analyst, 2017,142, 537-543
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN02387H

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Gordon F. Kirkbright Bursary Award, 2017

Graphical AbstractThe Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award is a prestigious annual award that enables a promising student/non-tenured young scientist of any nation to attend a recognised scientific meeting or visit a place of learning.
The fund for this bursary was established in 1985 as a memorial to Professor Gordon Kirkbright in recognition of his contributions to analytical spectroscopy and to science in general. Although the fund is administered by the Association of British Spectroscopists (ABS) Trust, the award is not restricted to spectroscopists.

Applications are invited for the 2017 Gordon Kirkbright Bursary.

For further information contact John Chalmers at, email: vibspecconsult@aol.com

The closing date for entries is 31 December 2016.
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Open Access papers in Analyst

We are very pleased to share with you below some of the latest Open Access papers published in Analyst that may be of interest to you. These research papers are free to access for all – we hope you enjoy reading them.

Rebekah Louise Sayers, Phil E Johnson, Justin T Marsh, Perdita Barran, Helen Brown and Clare Mills
Analyst, 2016, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00359A, Paper

Marco Realini, Alessandra Botteon, Claudia Conti, Chiara Colombo and Pavel Matousek
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00413J, Paper

Jakob Felix Hitzenberger, Claudia Dammann, Nina Lang, Dominik Lungerich, Miguel García-Iglesias, Giovanni Bottari, Tomás Torres, Norbert Jux and Thomas Drewello
Analyst, 2016, 141, 1347-1355
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02148K, Paper

Loanda R. Cumba, Christopher W. Foster, Dale A. C. Brownson, Jamie P. Smith, Jesus Iniesta, Bhawana Thakur, Devaney R. do Carmo and Craig E. Banks
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00167J, Paper

Georgios Theophilou, Kássio M. G. Lima, Pierre L. Martin-Hirsch, Helen F. Stringfellow and Francis L. Martin
Analyst, 2016, 141, 585-594
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00939A, Paper

Samuel J. Allen, Kevin Giles, Tony Gilbert and Matthew F. Bush
Analyst, 2016, 141, 884-891
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02107C, Paper

S. Casabella, P. Scully, N. Goddard and P. Gardner
Analyst, 2016, 141, 689-696
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01851J, Paper

Woong Kim, Nara Kim, Eunbyoul Lee, Duckhoe Kim, Zee Hwan Kim and Joon Won Park
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00035E, Communication

Blake M. Bluestein, Fionnuala Morrish, Daniel J. Graham, Jamie Guenthoer, David Hockenbery, Peggy L. Porter and Lara J. Gamble
Analyst, 2016, 141, 1947-1957
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02406D, Paper

Katherine Ganio, Simon A. James, Dominic J. Hare, Blaine R. Roberts and Gawain McColl
Analyst, 2016, 141, 1434-1439
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02544C, Paper

Satish Balasaheb Nimse, Mukesh Digambar Sonawane, Keum-Soo Song and Taisun Kim
Analyst, 2016, 141, 740-755
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01790D, Critical Review

Suman Mallick, Falguni Chandra and Apurba L. Koner
Analyst, 2016, 141, 827-831
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01911G, Communication

Bing Li, Yong Qiu, Hanchang Shi and Huabing Yin
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02649K, Paper

Elias Blanco, Christopher W. Foster, Loanda R. Cumba, Devaney R. do Carmo and Craig E. Banks
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00440G, Paper

Morphy C. Dumlao, Laura E. Jeffress, J. Justin Gooding and William A. Donald
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00178E, Paper

Thomas P. McNamara and Christopher F. Blanford
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00143B, Paper

Yuki Hiruta, Ryosuke Kanazashi, Eri Ayano, Teruo Okano and Hideko Kanazawa
Analyst, 2016, 141, 910-917
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01996F, Paper

Julia Kuligowski, Marwa R. EL-Zahry, Ángel Sánchez-Illana, Guillermo Quintás, Máximo Vento and Bernhard Lendl
Analyst, 2016, 141, 2165-2174
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01865J, Paper

Drupad K. Trivedi, Katherine A. Hollywood, Nicholas J. W. Rattray, Holli Ward, Dakshat K. Trivedi, Joseph Greenwood, David I. Ellis and Royston Goodacre
Analyst, 2016, 141, 2155-2164
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00108D, Paper

Miguel Aller Pellitero, Maria Kitsara, Friedrich Eibensteiner and F. Javier del Campo
Analyst, 2016, 141, 2515-2522
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02424B, Paper

P. Matousek, C. Conti, M. Realini and C. Colombo
Analyst, 2016, 141, 731-739
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02129D, Critical Review

L. E. Jones, A. Stewart, K. L. Peters, M. McNaul, S. J. Speers, N. C. Fletcher and S. E. J. Bell
Analyst, 2016, 141, 902-909
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02326B, Paper

Rachael Smith, Karen L. Wright and Lorna Ashton
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00152A, Critical Review

Vijaya Sunkara, Hyun-Kyung Woo and Yoon-Kyoung Cho
Analyst, 2016, 141, 371-381
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01775K, Minireview

John J. MacInnis, Trevor C. VandenBoer and Cora J. Young
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00313C, Paper

James Ord, Holly J. Butler, Martin R. McAinsh and Francis L. Martin
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00392C, Paper

Tanja Gaissmaier, Markus Siebenhaar, Vanya Todorova, Volker Hüllen and Carsten Hopf
Analyst, 2016, 141, 892-901
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02302E, Paper

Bhawana Thakur, Elena Bernalte, Jamie P. Smith, Christopher W. Foster, Patricia E. Linton, Shilpa N. Sawant and Craig E. Banks
Analyst, 2016,141, 1233-1238
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02469B, Communication

Santiago Medina-Rodríguez, Sergey A. Denisov, Yanouk Cudré, Louise Male, Marta Marín-Suárez, Alberto Fernández-Gutiérrez, Jorge F. Fernández-Sánchez, Arnaud Tron, Gediminas Jonusauskas, Nathan D. McClenaghan and Etienne Baranoff
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00497K, Paper

Joshua M. Jackson, James B. Taylor, Małgorzata A. Witek, Sally A. Hunsucker, Jennifer P. Waugh, Yuri Fedoriw, Thomas C. Shea, Steven A. Soper and Paul M. Armistead
Analyst, 2016, 141, 640-651
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01836F, Paper
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X-ray advances Aboriginal culture study

Graphical Abstract


For the first time, Australian scientists have studied complex mixtures of natural pigments on intact Aboriginal Australian artefacts using x-ray fluorescence microscopy.

Previously applied to canvas paintings, the group at Flinders University applied the technique, which analyses the composition, application and layering of pigments, to two indigenous Australian objects – a boomerang and a bark painting. X-ray fluorescence microscopy allows complex elemental analysis of pigment mixtures of varying thickness without the need for damaging sample extraction. The objects are analysed directly in the x-ray beam.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>

Novel application of X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) for the non-destructive micro-elemental analysis of natural mineral pigments on Aboriginal Australian objects
Rachel S. Popelka-Filcoff, Claire E. Lenehan, Enzo Lombi, Erica Donner, Daryl L. Howard, Martin D. de Jonge, David Paterson, Keryn Walshe and Allan Pring
Analyst, 2016
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02065D, Paper

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44th International Symposium on High Performance Liquid Phase Separations and Related Techniques

Graphical Abstract


The 44th International Symposium on High Performance Liquid Phase Separations and Related Techniques (HPLC 2016) is due to take place at the Marriott San Francisco Marquis, CA between 19th – 24th June 2016.

‘The goal of HPLC 2016 is to bring together scientists who use and develop HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, supercritical fluidic chromatography, microfluidics, and mass spectrometry to exchange ideas, best practices, and latest developments.’

Dates for your diary:

April 11th 2016: Abstract deadline for Poster Presentations
April 18th 2016: Registration and fee payment deadline for presenting author
April 18th 2016: Final program posted online
May 1st 2016: Deadline for reduced registration fees
June 1st 2016: Final deadline to submit late-breaking posters to the online program

SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT HERE

For more information about the conference and to register your interest please see their website: HPLC2016.org

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Test to tell if your mince is telling porkies

Graphical AbstractScientists in the UK are battling food fraud with a new quantitative method for detecting pork in beef mince using metabolic fingerprints.
‘Doping beef mince with cheaper pork meat has become a common practice for economic gain,’ explains team member Drupad Trivedi, from Roy Goodacre’s group at the University of Manchester. Though this in itself is not life-threatening, doping and mislabeling meat raises significant ethical and religious concerns.

Meat, the metabolites: an integrated metabolite profiling and lipidomics approach for the detection of the adulteration of beef with pork
Drupad Trivedi, Katherine Anne Hollywood, Nicholas John William Rattray, Holli Ward, Joseph Greenwood, David I. Ellis and Royston Goodacre
Analyst, 2016, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00108D, Paper

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Uncoiling collagen using advanced computers

Graphical Abstract
British and French researchers have used modern computing power to enhance mass spectrometry and analyse an extremely complex collagen molecule in a short time scale.

Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS), developed in the 1980s, links the mass-to-charge ratios of precursors and fragments in complex samples. Compared to tandem mass spectrometry, 2D FT-ICR MS does not require isolated precursors and shows better resolution. Its applications have been limited, however, due to a lack of sophisticated computers.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


H. J. Simon, M. A. van Agthoven, P. Y. Lam, F. Floris, L. Chiron, M.-A. Delsuc, C. Rolando, M. P. Barrow and P. B. O’Connor
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01757B, Paper

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our most recent HOT Analyst articles, these are now free to access for the next few weeks!

Graphical Abstract

Superposition of an AC Field improves the discrimination between peptides in nanopore analysis.
Elisabet Jakova and Jeremy S. Lee
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02180K

Versatile G-quadruplex-Mediated Strategies in Label-Free Biosensors and Logic Systems
Jiangtao Ren, Tianshu Wang, Erkang Wang and Jin Wang
Analyst, 2015,140, 2556-2572
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02282C

Label-free and highly sensitive electrochemiluminescent biosensing using quantum dots/carbon nanotubes in ionic liquid
Wenwen Tu, Xuelin Fang, Jing Lou and Zhihui Dai
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2603-2607
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02129K

Analysis of fast channel blockage: revealing substrate binding in the microsecond range
Igor Bodrenko, Harsha Bajaj, Paolo Ruggerone, Mathias Winterhalter and Matteo Ceccarelli
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02293A

The potential of chiroptical and vibrational spectroscopies of blood plasma for the discrimination between colon cancer patients and the control group
Michal Tatarkovič, Michaela Miškovičová, Lucie Šťovíčková, Alla Synytsya, Luboš Petruželka and Vladimír Setnička
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2287-2293
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01880J

Drop-by-Drop Chemical Reaction and Sample Introduction for Capillary Electrophoresis

Fengming Chen, Ying Rang, Ying Weng, Luyao Lin, Hulie Zeng, Hizuru Nakajim, Jin-Ming Lin and Katsumi Uchiyama
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00040H
Graphical Abstract
The role of lipid droplets and adipocytes in cancer. Raman imaging of cell cultures: MCF10A, MCF7, MDA-MB-231 compared to adipocytes in cancerous human breast tissue
Halina Abramczyk, Jakub Surmacki, Monika Kopeć, Alicja Klaudia Olejnik, Katarzyna Lubecka-Pietruszewska and Krystyna Fabianowska-Majewska
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2224-2235
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN01875C

Label-Free Free-Solution Nanoaperture Optical Tweezers for Single Molecule Protein Studies
Ahmed A. Al Balushi, Abhay Kotnala, Skyler Wheaton, Ryan M. Gelfand, Yashaswini Rajashekara and Reuven Gordon
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02213K

A step towards Mobile Arsenic measurement for surface waters

C. A. de Villiers, M. C. Lapsley and E. A. H. Hall
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2644-2655
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02368D

Gold nanorod-based localized surface plasmon resonance platform for the detection of environmentally toxic metal ions
Subramaniam Jayabal, Alagarsamy Pandikumar, Hong Ngee Lim, Ramasamy Ramaraj, Tong Sun and Nay Ming Huang
Analyst, 2015, 140, 2540-2555
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN02330G

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Cocaine users sweat over fingerprint analysis

Graphical Abstract

Scientists in the UK and the Netherlands have revealed a rapid, single-fingerprint test for cocaine use. The procedure is less invasive, more hygienic and faster than established approaches, which typically test blood, urine or saliva. Portable versions could be available to law enforcement agencies within the next decade.

Have you recently taken an illicit drug? You have the right to remain silent, but if authorities really need an answer, there’s a global testing industry worth several billion dollars on hand to help, with an array of analytical techniques. Potentially adding to this arsenal, a team of scientists led by Melanie Bailey at the University of Surrey have now demonstrated a formidable test for cocaine – don’t sweat, it only needs one fingerprint.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>


Rapid detection of cocaine, benzoylecgonine and methylecgonine in fingerprints using surface mass spectrometry
Melanie J. Bailey, Robert Bradshaw, Simona Francese, Tara L. Salter, Catia Costa, Mahado Ismail, Roger P. Webb, Ingrid Bosman, Kim Wolff and Marcel de Puit
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00112A

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

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Photoacoustic nanoparticles highlight uranium in the body

Graphical Abstract

Nanoparticles that can be detected with photoacoustic imaging when they complex with uranium ions could open the door to new plans of action after radiological incidents, like Chernobyl or Fukushima, US researchers claim.

Ultrasound imaging is a well-known technique – it’s used during pregnancy and to assess joint injuries, amongst other things. The basics are simple: sound comes in and sound comes out; the difference in backscattered sound is turned into an image. Analogously, in photoacoustic procedures a pulse of light goes in and some of its energy is absorbed. This energy heats the local area and produces a pressure wave as it expands, which is measured acoustically.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>


Parts per billion detection of uranium with a porphyrinoid-containing nanoparticle and in vivo photoacoustic imaging
I-Ting Ho, Jonathan L. Sessler, Sanjiv Sam Gambhir and Jesse V. Jokerst
Analyst, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00207A

Do you fancy submitting an article to Analyst? Why not submit to us here today or alternatively email us with your suggestions!

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