Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Simple polymer tongue can taste the difference

Scientists in Germany have designed a simple polymer that can be used in a sensor to distinguish between similar fruit juices.

Sensors that analyse food, drink and drugs are important for quality control and preventing fraud. Chemo-optical sensors, or tongues, already exist for testing wine, coffee, whiskey and other beverages. Due to the complex nature of these samples, the tongues comprise a number of sensors, which undergo structural changes to provide a colour or fluorescence pattern in the presence of various analytes. Chemometric techniques then analyse the pattern, reporting the distinct ‘taste’ for each product.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>

This paper is free to access until 5th April, 2017:

Poly(p-phenyleneethynylene)-based tongues discriminate fruit juices
Jinsong Han, Benhua Wang, Markus Bender, Kai Seehafera and Uwe H.F. Bunz
Analyst, 2017,142, 537-543
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN02387H

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Outstanding Reviewers for Analyst in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Analyst in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Hugh J. Byrne, Focas Research Institute

Dr Colin Campbell, University of Edinburgh

Dr Lingxin Chen, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry

Dr Jaebum Choo, Hanyang University

Professor Karen Faulds, University of Strathclyde

Professor Ning Gan, Ningbo University

Dr Takeaki Ozawa, University of Tokyo

Professor Martin Pumera, Nanyang Technological University

Professor Zachary Schultz, University of Notre Dame

Professor Chaoyong Yang, Xiamen University

We would also like to thank the Analyst board and the analytical science community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.


If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Congratulations to the RSC Award winners at SciX2016!

Congratulations to the RSC award winners who received their prizes at the RSC Awards Symposium, held on Monday 19 September at SciX2016, Minneapolis, USA.

Patrick Hayes was awarded the Analyst Emerging Investigators Lectureship, presented by the Executive Editor of Analyst, Philippa Hughes.

Patrick Hayes awarded the Emerging Investigator Lectureship

This lectureship was launched as a platform for an early career analytical scientist to raise the profile of the analytical sciences to the wider scientific community and general public. The candidates were asked to submit an original essay of no more than 1000 words highlighting the significant and wide-reaching impact on scientific and societal issues related to this year’s theme of health in the analytical sciences. The awardee receives up to £2000 contribution towards travel and accommodation costs to attend and present a lecture based on their research at a leading international meeting. Their essay will also be published as a Perspective article in Analyst.

The Chair of Analyst, Professor Duncan Graham (University of Strathclyde), was also awarded the RSC Theophilus Redwood Award 2016. The Theophilus Redwood Award is given to a leading analytical scientist who is also an outstanding communicator and is awarded to Duncan for innovation and leadership in exploiting surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in the analytical community.

Philippa Hughes presenting Duncan Graham with the RSC Theophilus Redwood Award

Congratulations to both Patrick and Duncan for their achievements!

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What we do in the shadows…

What goes up, must come down...

We are all passionate scientists, but we all have a “dark” side. I know for example that Professor Pat Unwin at Warwick University is an accomplished musician, likewise, Professor Dermot Diamond at Dublin City University. And myself? I run. I run trail races. I run ultra trail races.

What’s the meaning of “ultra”? Well, anything beyond a marathon: 45k… 50k… 70k… 100k… 160k… and beyond! I just ran across the beautiful island of Corsica – 5 days, a whopping 185k, 12,000m of altitude up and all the way down again. Tough? Yes… but doable! Admittedly, you go through 10 “runners highs” and 25+ “runners lows”. But in the end – doable! And after that adventure, I asked myself, how different are profession and passion actually? Maybe we should explore this a little further…

Let’s consider an example – writing an EU proposal or an ERC grant? Tough? Yes… but doable! And honestly, there are at least 10 “proposal highs” and 25+ “proposal lows” you go through. So, how different are profession and passion? Let’s see by comparing writing a major proposal versus preparing for an ultra trail race!

1. It’s all about preparation A clear “yes” for both!

2. You need to focusTrue, relevant in both cases!

3. Preliminary results are important –  It’s all about knowing what you are up to… tick the box for both!

4. Step outside your comfort zone –  No new achievements without breaking new ground. Ticked!

5. Physical and mental fitness –  A prerequisite, right?

6. You never know whether you will be successful, unless you try –  Guess we agree! Ticked!

7. If you fail, try again, fail better –  Ticked for both!

8. Never give up –  Who would ever do that?

After all, not so different right? Seems there is a lot of analogy between preparing a proposal and preparing for an ultra trail race! Whether you are a musician, an ultra trail runner, a scientist or an interdisciplinary combination, if you do it with passion, it may be tough, but it is doable!


See you on the next (ultra) trail! And don’t forget 9. Any step is a step closer to the finish line 😉 Cheers, Boris



More stories on Europe’s toughest trek: Corsica GR20 can be found here


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ASASS 2

ASASS (ACROSS International Symposium on Advances in Separation Science) is an International Symposium dedicated to showcasing the latest and greatest achievements in the field of separation science and related techniques, bringing together the leading scientists and practitioners within Australia, with invited international experts of world renown.

ASASS will be taking place from November 30 to December 2 in Hobart, Tasmania.

To find out more details about ASASS 2016, please click here. You can also see here for registration information.

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Editorial Board member Boris Mizaikoff wins RSC Emerging Technologies Competition prize

Congratulations to Editorial Board member Boris Mizaikoff and researchers at Ulm University for winning a second prize in the RSC Emerging Technologies Competition 2016.

The Emerging Technologies Competition is the Royal Society of Chemistry’s annual innovation initiative, turning promising ideas into commercial reality. Now in its fourth year, the competition brings cutting edge science to the real world for the benefit of society.

Entrants were required to pitch their ideas to a panel of expert judges, in front of a live audience, at Chemistry Means Business on 15 June 2016.

Professor Mizaikoff and researchers at Ulm University, were awarded second prize in the Health & Wellbeing category for their advanced infrared breath diagnostic devices.

Ulm University is using substrate-integrated hollow waveguides to facilitate the development of label-free miniaturised breath diagnostic devices, based on mid-infrared sensing technology. This allows quantitative determination of volatile organic biomarkers in exhaled breath within minute sample volumes, with high time resolution, and with inherent molecular selectivity at trace levels.”

You can read more about the winners of the competition here and also register your interest for next years competition.

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Nanoprobes to guide cancer radiotherapy dosing

Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can help optimise radiotherapy treatment regimes for prostate cancer, UK scientists have shown.

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide in men, and the fourth most common cancer overall. It is usually treated with radiotherapy, and doctors would like to tailor doses for individual patients. This would help maximise tumour cell destruction, while minimising damage to normal tissue.

To read the full article by Sarah Rogers, please visit Chemistry World.

Measuring the effects of fractionated radiation therapy in a 3D prostate cancer model system using SERS nanosensors

Victoria L. Camus, Grant Stewart, William H. Nailon, Duncan B. McLarend and Colin J. Campbell
Analyst, 2016
DOI:  10.1039/C6AN01032F



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Gordon F. Kirkbright Bursary Award, 2017

Graphical AbstractThe Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award is a prestigious annual award that enables a promising student/non-tenured young scientist of any nation to attend a recognised scientific meeting or visit a place of learning.
The fund for this bursary was established in 1985 as a memorial to Professor Gordon Kirkbright in recognition of his contributions to analytical spectroscopy and to science in general. Although the fund is administered by the Association of British Spectroscopists (ABS) Trust, the award is not restricted to spectroscopists.

Applications are invited for the 2017 Gordon Kirkbright Bursary.

For further information contact John Chalmers at, email: vibspecconsult@aol.com

The closing date for entries is 31 December 2016.
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Is food allergen analysis flawed?

Dairy products

© Shutterstock

It’s Allergy Awareness Week 25 April – 1 May, 2016.

There are around 21 million people who suffer from allergies in the UK alone.  Allergy UK is the leading national charity dedicated to supporting these people, and provides a dedicated helpline and online forums. Allergy Awareness Week hopes to draw attention to a number of allergies and promote well-being in those individuals who suffer from them.

Researchers at LGC, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Allergy Action, and the University of Manchester have combined to produce a critical review published in Analyst on the flaws in the analysis of food allergens that could jeopardise their future risk management, as well as ways to address those flaws. Follow the link below to read their review.

Peanuts

© Shutterstock

Is food allergen analysis flawed? Health and supply chain risks and a proposed framework to address urgent analytical needs
M. J. Walker, D. T. Burns, C. T. Elliott, M. H. Gowland and E. N. Clare Mills
Analyst, 2016, 141, 24-35
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01457C

Check out the Chemistry World comment on allergies from Michael Walker here.

Interested to read more about food testing? Try the ‘Detecting food authenticity and integrity‘ online collection: A compilation of papers showcasing the latest discoveries and developments in the analysis and detection of food fraud, contamination, adulteration and spoilage.

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Open Access papers in Analyst

We are very pleased to share with you below some of the latest Open Access papers published in Analyst that may be of interest to you. These research papers are free to access for all – we hope you enjoy reading them.

Rebekah Louise Sayers, Phil E Johnson, Justin T Marsh, Perdita Barran, Helen Brown and Clare Mills
Analyst, 2016, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00359A, Paper

Marco Realini, Alessandra Botteon, Claudia Conti, Chiara Colombo and Pavel Matousek
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00413J, Paper

Jakob Felix Hitzenberger, Claudia Dammann, Nina Lang, Dominik Lungerich, Miguel García-Iglesias, Giovanni Bottari, Tomás Torres, Norbert Jux and Thomas Drewello
Analyst, 2016, 141, 1347-1355
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02148K, Paper

Loanda R. Cumba, Christopher W. Foster, Dale A. C. Brownson, Jamie P. Smith, Jesus Iniesta, Bhawana Thakur, Devaney R. do Carmo and Craig E. Banks
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00167J, Paper

Georgios Theophilou, Kássio M. G. Lima, Pierre L. Martin-Hirsch, Helen F. Stringfellow and Francis L. Martin
Analyst, 2016, 141, 585-594
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN00939A, Paper

Samuel J. Allen, Kevin Giles, Tony Gilbert and Matthew F. Bush
Analyst, 2016, 141, 884-891
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02107C, Paper

S. Casabella, P. Scully, N. Goddard and P. Gardner
Analyst, 2016, 141, 689-696
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01851J, Paper

Woong Kim, Nara Kim, Eunbyoul Lee, Duckhoe Kim, Zee Hwan Kim and Joon Won Park
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00035E, Communication

Blake M. Bluestein, Fionnuala Morrish, Daniel J. Graham, Jamie Guenthoer, David Hockenbery, Peggy L. Porter and Lara J. Gamble
Analyst, 2016, 141, 1947-1957
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02406D, Paper

Katherine Ganio, Simon A. James, Dominic J. Hare, Blaine R. Roberts and Gawain McColl
Analyst, 2016, 141, 1434-1439
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02544C, Paper

Satish Balasaheb Nimse, Mukesh Digambar Sonawane, Keum-Soo Song and Taisun Kim
Analyst, 2016, 141, 740-755
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01790D, Critical Review

Suman Mallick, Falguni Chandra and Apurba L. Koner
Analyst, 2016, 141, 827-831
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01911G, Communication

Bing Li, Yong Qiu, Hanchang Shi and Huabing Yin
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02649K, Paper

Elias Blanco, Christopher W. Foster, Loanda R. Cumba, Devaney R. do Carmo and Craig E. Banks
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00440G, Paper

Morphy C. Dumlao, Laura E. Jeffress, J. Justin Gooding and William A. Donald
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00178E, Paper

Thomas P. McNamara and Christopher F. Blanford
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00143B, Paper

Yuki Hiruta, Ryosuke Kanazashi, Eri Ayano, Teruo Okano and Hideko Kanazawa
Analyst, 2016, 141, 910-917
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01996F, Paper

Julia Kuligowski, Marwa R. EL-Zahry, Ángel Sánchez-Illana, Guillermo Quintás, Máximo Vento and Bernhard Lendl
Analyst, 2016, 141, 2165-2174
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01865J, Paper

Drupad K. Trivedi, Katherine A. Hollywood, Nicholas J. W. Rattray, Holli Ward, Dakshat K. Trivedi, Joseph Greenwood, David I. Ellis and Royston Goodacre
Analyst, 2016, 141, 2155-2164
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00108D, Paper

Miguel Aller Pellitero, Maria Kitsara, Friedrich Eibensteiner and F. Javier del Campo
Analyst, 2016, 141, 2515-2522
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02424B, Paper

P. Matousek, C. Conti, M. Realini and C. Colombo
Analyst, 2016, 141, 731-739
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02129D, Critical Review

L. E. Jones, A. Stewart, K. L. Peters, M. McNaul, S. J. Speers, N. C. Fletcher and S. E. J. Bell
Analyst, 2016, 141, 902-909
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02326B, Paper

Rachael Smith, Karen L. Wright and Lorna Ashton
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00152A, Critical Review

Vijaya Sunkara, Hyun-Kyung Woo and Yoon-Kyoung Cho
Analyst, 2016, 141, 371-381
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01775K, Minireview

John J. MacInnis, Trevor C. VandenBoer and Cora J. Young
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00313C, Paper

James Ord, Holly J. Butler, Martin R. McAinsh and Francis L. Martin
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00392C, Paper

Tanja Gaissmaier, Markus Siebenhaar, Vanya Todorova, Volker Hüllen and Carsten Hopf
Analyst, 2016, 141, 892-901
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02302E, Paper

Bhawana Thakur, Elena Bernalte, Jamie P. Smith, Christopher W. Foster, Patricia E. Linton, Shilpa N. Sawant and Craig E. Banks
Analyst, 2016,141, 1233-1238
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN02469B, Communication

Santiago Medina-Rodríguez, Sergey A. Denisov, Yanouk Cudré, Louise Male, Marta Marín-Suárez, Alberto Fernández-Gutiérrez, Jorge F. Fernández-Sánchez, Arnaud Tron, Gediminas Jonusauskas, Nathan D. McClenaghan and Etienne Baranoff
Analyst, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN00497K, Paper

Joshua M. Jackson, James B. Taylor, Małgorzata A. Witek, Sally A. Hunsucker, Jennifer P. Waugh, Yuri Fedoriw, Thomas C. Shea, Steven A. Soper and Paul M. Armistead
Analyst, 2016, 141, 640-651
DOI: 10.1039/C5AN01836F, Paper
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