Archive for the ‘Board News’ Category

Professor Laura Lechuga: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Laura Lechuga as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board. Laura will start as an Analyst Associate Editor on the 1st July 2018.

 


Laura Lechuga is the CSIC Research Professor at the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Spain. She is the leader of the ICN2 Nanobiosensors and Bioanalytical Applications Group, which focusses on the technological development of nanophotonic biosensors, their integration into portable lab-on-a-chip platforms and their application in clinical and environmental diagnostics.

Professor Lechuga gained her PhD in chemistry in 1992 from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Between 2012 and 2015 she was an adjunct professor at the University of Norway within their department of Physics and Technology at the Artic. She has also been a distinguished visiting professor at the School of Electrical and Computer Sciences of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil) since 2013.


We welcome Professor Lechuga and her expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as an Associate Editor. Submit your articles to Professor Lechuga from the 1st of July 2018!


You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Jaebum Choo: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Jaebum Choo as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Jaebum Choo is a Professor in the Department of Bionano Technology at Hanyang University. He obtained his PhD in Molecular Spectroscopy at Texas A&M University in 1994 and then, in 1995,  joined as a faculty member of Hanyang University. Jaebum has been the Director of “Center for Integrated Human Sensing System” (ERC supported by National Research Foundation of Korea, 2009-2013)and a President of Korean Biochip Society in 2015.

He is currently a BK21+ Director of Bionano Fusion Technology Program supported by National Research Foundation of Korea. His main research areas are SERS, biosensors, micro-devices and molecular spectroscopy. His current research programs are centered on the development of highly sensitive optical nano-sensor systems for rapid and sensitive in vitro diagnostics. He has given more than 130 invited lectures in the USA, Europe and Asia, and has published over 240 research papers in peer-reviewed journals and 5 book chapters. Professor Choo was appointed as a Baik Nam Distinguished Professor in 2015 due to his excellent academic achievements.


We welcome Professor Jaebum Choo and his expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as an Associate Editor. Submit your article to Professor Jaebum Choo today!


Read some of Professor Choo’s latest research published in Analyst:

Analysis of ribonuclease activity in sub-nanoliter droplets by label-free fluorescence measurements

Choi, J.-W., Vasamsetti, B.M.K., Kim, K.-W., Seo, S.H., Lee, D.-H., Chang, S.-I., Choo, J., Kim, H.Y.

Raman spectrum identification based on the correlation score using the weighted segmental hit quality index

Park, J.-K., Park, A., Yang, S.K., Baek, S.-J., Hwang, J., Choo, J.

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Professor Damien Arrigan: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Damien Arrigan as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Damien Arrigan is a Professor of Analytical Chemistry at Curtin University, Perth, Australia. He studied as an undergraduate at Dublin City University and, after a two-year career in industrial biotechnology, undertook his PhD (1992) at the National University of Ireland, Cork, on electroanalysis with chemically modified electrodes.

Following postdoctoral positions at the National Microelectronics Research Centre (Cork) and the University of Southampton, he was a lecturer in analytical chemistry at University of Salford. In 2001 he relocated to Tyndall National Institute, Cork, where he started to combine miniaturisation tools with electrochemistry for detection purposes and in 2009 he moved to Curtin University.

Damien’s research interests encompass analytical chemistry and its boundaries with electrochemistry, especially the development of new sensing and detection methods and devices. Recent emphasis has been on exploration of the analytical opportunities afforded by electrochemistry at liquid-liquid (oil-water) interfaces, especially by miniaturisation of these interfaces for chemical and biochemical sensing. Current interests include nanopores and nanoscale electrochemistry, behaviour and detection of biological macromolecules and disease biomarkers, and the development of sensors to enhance water re-use technologies. You can find out more about Damien’s research on his homepage.


We welcome Professor Damien Arrigan and his expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as an Associate Editor. Submit your article to Professor Damien Arrigan today!


Read some of Professor Arrigan’s latest research published in Analyst:

Electrochemical behaviour at a liquid-organogel microinterface array of fucoidan extracted from algae

Felisilda, B.M.B, Alvarez De Eulate, E., Stringer, D.N., Fitton, J.H. and Arrigan, D.W.M.

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Nanopipette probes cells without killing them

A research team from Japan has developed a method for sampling tiny amounts of fluid from single cells without killing them. They hope their technique will allow scientists to better study cellular mechanisms from differentiation to cancer formation.

Advances in analytical detection methods enable processing and detection of analytes, even individual molecules, from single cell samples. But before chemical analysis can take place, a sample must be extracted from the cell – a procedure the cell usually doesn’t survive.

Takehiko Kitamori’s team from the University of Tokyo now managed to form a 100nm-wide hole in a human cell membrane and connect this hole to a tiny pipette to extract a sample – all while keeping the cell alive. Instead of piercing the cell by force, they coated their nanopipette with a lipid bilayer, the same material the cell membrane is made out of, which causes the two to fuse.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Micro/extended-nano sampling interface from a living single cell
L. Lin, K. Mawatari, K. Morikawa, Y. Pihosh, A. Yoshizaki and T. Kitamori
Analyst, 2017, 142, 1689-1696
DOI: 10.1039/C7AN00220C, Paper

This paper is free to access until 16th June

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Professor Ryan C. Bailey: New Analyst Associate Editor

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Professor Ryan C. Bailey as Associate Editor to the Analyst Editorial Board.


Ryan C. Bailey received his PhD from Northwestern University in 2004 and then was a joint Post-doctoral Fellow at Caltech and the Institute for Systems Biology. He joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2006, with affiliate appointments in the Department of Bioengineering, Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, and Institute for Genomic Biology.

In 2016, Professor Bailey was appointed as the Robert A. Gregg Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Michigan. Professor Bailey’s research generally focuses on the development of new microscale analytical methods for detecting biomarkers and characterizing (bio)molecular interactions with applications in personalized clinical diagnostics and fundamental biochemistry/biophysics. To this end, his group has developed chip-integrated optical detection methods and microfluidic approaches that are being applied to translational transcriptomic, proteomic, and epigenomic analyses.

Professor Bailey has received various awards, including the Pittcon Achievement Award (2015), Arthur F. Findeis Award for Achievements by a Young Analytical Scientist (2013), and a NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (2007), and was named to the TR35: 35 Top Innovators under 35 list by Technology Review in 2012.


We welcome Professor Ryan C. Bailey and his expertise to the Analyst Editorial Board as Associate Editor alongside Takehiko Kitamori, Lanqun Mao, Jean-Francois Masson, Boris Mizaikoff, Steven Soper and Evan Williams. Submit your article to Professor Ryan C. Bailey today!

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Analyst by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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What we do in the shadows…

What goes up, must come down...

We are all passionate scientists, but we all have a “dark” side. I know for example that Professor Pat Unwin at Warwick University is an accomplished musician, likewise, Professor Dermot Diamond at Dublin City University. And myself? I run. I run trail races. I run ultra trail races.

What’s the meaning of “ultra”? Well, anything beyond a marathon: 45k… 50k… 70k… 100k… 160k… and beyond! I just ran across the beautiful island of Corsica – 5 days, a whopping 185k, 12,000m of altitude up and all the way down again. Tough? Yes… but doable! Admittedly, you go through 10 “runners highs” and 25+ “runners lows”. But in the end – doable! And after that adventure, I asked myself, how different are profession and passion actually? Maybe we should explore this a little further…

Let’s consider an example – writing an EU proposal or an ERC grant? Tough? Yes… but doable! And honestly, there are at least 10 “proposal highs” and 25+ “proposal lows” you go through. So, how different are profession and passion? Let’s see by comparing writing a major proposal versus preparing for an ultra trail race!

1. It’s all about preparation A clear “yes” for both!

2. You need to focusTrue, relevant in both cases!

3. Preliminary results are important –  It’s all about knowing what you are up to… tick the box for both!

4. Step outside your comfort zone –  No new achievements without breaking new ground. Ticked!

5. Physical and mental fitness –  A prerequisite, right?

6. You never know whether you will be successful, unless you try –  Guess we agree! Ticked!

7. If you fail, try again, fail better –  Ticked for both!

8. Never give up –  Who would ever do that?

After all, not so different right? Seems there is a lot of analogy between preparing a proposal and preparing for an ultra trail race! Whether you are a musician, an ultra trail runner, a scientist or an interdisciplinary combination, if you do it with passion, it may be tough, but it is doable!


See you on the next (ultra) trail! And don’t forget 9. Any step is a step closer to the finish line 😉 Cheers, Boris



More stories on Europe’s toughest trek: Corsica GR20 can be found here


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New technology may spell the end of having to discard liquids from hand luggage before boarding a plane

An image of the Cobalt Light Systems team

The Cobalt Light Systems team, from left to right: Pavel Matousek, Chief Scientific Officer; Guy Maskall, Data Scientist; Stuart Bonthron, VP Product Development; Craig Tombling, Chief Operating Officer; Paul Loeffen, Chief Executive Officer.(Credit: Cobalt Light Systems)

Analyst Editorial Board Member Professor Pavel Matousek at the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) Central Laser Facility explains, “The technology works using the technique of Raman spectroscopy. When combined with advanced algorithms to distinguish between the container and its contents, the technology is able to identify the chemical composition in seconds, and with greater reliability than any other existing system.”

The equipment developed by the Cobalt Light Systems team characterises the contents inside non-metallic containers, protecting travellers by screening for liquid explosives and has been shortlisted to win the UK’s premier engineering prize, the MacRobert Award.

To read more about this story and the MacRobert Award 2014 head over to the Science & Technology Facilities Council website.

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2013 Dreyfus Prize awarded to Graham Cooks

2013 Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences

The 2013 Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences has been awarded to Graham Cooks

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has selected chemical instrumentation as the topic of the 2013 Dreyfus Prize in the Chemical Sciences. The Dreyfus Prize, awarded biennially, recognizes an individual for exceptional and original research in a selected area of chemistry that has advanced the field in a major way.

This year the Dreyfus Prize has been awarded to R. Graham Cooks, the Henry Bohn Hass Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Purdue University, Advisory Board member of Analyst and Chemical Science. Graham Cooks is recognized internationally as an innovative giant in the field of mass spectrometry who has enriched analytical chemistry in unparalleled ways. Virtually every pharmaceutical and biotechnology company relies on mass spectrometry at a level that has become possible, in part, through Cooks’s innovations. Click to read more.

Take a look at a few of Graham’s recent papers in Analyst and Chemical Science below they will be free to read until the end of the month:

Rapid analysis of whole blood by paper spray mass spectrometry for point-of-care therapeutic drug monitoring
Ryan D. Espy, Nicholas E. Manicke, Zheng Ouyang and R. Graham Cooks
Analyst, 2012, 137, 2344-2349
DOI: 10.1039/C2AN35082C

Accelerated bimolecular reactions in microdroplets studied by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry
Marion Girod, Encarnacion Moyano, Dahlia I. Campbell and R. Graham Cooks
Chem. Sci., 2011, 2, 501-510
DOI: 10.1039/C0SC00416B

Paper spray: a simple and efficient means of analysis of different contaminants in foodstuffs

Zhiping Zhang, R. Graham Cooks and Zheng Ouyang
Analyst, 2012, 137, 2556-2558
DOI: 10.1039/C2AN35196J

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18th Australian Electrochemistry Symposium, 15 April 2012

The 18th Australian Electrochemistry Symposium, sponsored by Analyst and Analytical Methods, runs all day on Sunday 15th April, at the Resources and Chemistry Precinct, Curtin University, Australia.

As well as a contributed lecture programme and poster session, there will be three keynote lectures by the 2012 medallists of the Electrochemistry Division of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (ED-RACI):

  • Joe Wang (University of California – San Diego), speaking on motion-based biosensing, is the 2012 Breyer Medallist
  • Justin Gooding (University of New South Wales), speaking on dispersible electrodes, is the 2012 Stokes Medallist
  • Jie Zhang (Monash University), speaking on reactions in ionic liquids, is the 2012 Bond Medallist

The meeting is being coordinated by Analyst Advisory Board member, Damien Arrigan, and further information can be found online.

 18th Australian Electrochemistry Symposium, Curtin University, 15 April 2012

Read some papers from the keynote speakers below:

Stamp Transfer Electrodes for Electrochemical Sensing on Non-Planar and Oversized Surfaces
Joshua Ray Windmiller, Amay Jairaj Bandodkar, Serguey Parkhomovsky and Joseph Wang
Analyst, 2012, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C2AN35041F

Wearable electrochemical sensors for in situ analysis in marine environments
Kerstin Malzahn, Joshua Ray Windmiller, Gabriela Valdés-Ramírez, Michael J. Schöning and Joseph Wang
Analyst, 2011, 136, 2912-2917
DOI: 10.1039/C1AN15193B

Development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of HbA1c in serum
Guozhen Liu, Sook Mei Khor, Sridhar G. Iyengar and J. Justin Gooding
Analyst, 2012, 137, 829-832
DOI: 10.1039/C2AN16034J
From collection: Future Electroanalytical Developments

Critical Review: Practical considerations associated with voltammetric studies in room temperature ionic liquids
Jie Zhang and Alan M. Bond
Analyst, 2005, 130, 1132-1147
DOI: 10.1039/B504721H

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New scanner for liquids at airports

The Insight 100 scanner which uses SORS to scan liquids

Insight 100 (Credit: Cobalt Light Systems)

The early-stage company Cobalt Light Systems has received European approval for its revolutionary INSIGHT100 bottle scanner, which could enable aircraft passengers to have liquid items larger than 100ml in their carry-on luggage.

The scanner uses Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS), a technique developed by Analyst Editorial Board member, Prof. Pavel Matousek of the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

Pavel says, “Since STFC made the breakthrough in discovering SORS a few years ago, we have worked closely with the team at Cobalt Light Systems to develop and refine this technology. It is particularly exciting to see how this particular scientific development could now go on to make a real difference to the safety and wellbeing of our society.”

Find out more in the full STFC press release here.

Take a look at some of Pavel’s work below:

Minireview: Non-invasive analysis of turbid samples using deep Raman spectroscopy
Kevin Buckley and Pavel Matousek
Analyst, 2011, 136, 3039-3050
DOI: 10.1039/C0AN00723D
From collection Grand Challenges in Analytical Chemistry

Towards a safe non-invasive method for evaluating the carbonate substitution levels of hydroxyapatite (HAP) in micro-calcifications found in breast tissue
Marleen M. Kerssens, Pavel Matousek, Keith Rogers and Nicholas Stone
Analyst, 2010, 135, 3156-3161
DOI: 10.1039/C0AN00565G
From themed issue Optical Diagnosis

Critical Review: Emerging concepts in deep Raman spectroscopy of biological tissue
Pavel Matousek and Nicholas Stone
Analyst, 2009, 134, 1058-1066
DOI: 10.1039/B821100K
From themed issue Optical Diagnosis

Subsurface probing of calcifications with spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS): future possibilities for the diagnosis of breast cancer
Nicholas Stone, Rebecca Baker, Keith Rogers, Anthony William Parker and Pavel Matousek
Analyst, 2007, 132, 899-905
DOI: 10.1039/B705029A

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