Archive for May, 2014

HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks:

Two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheets as a capillary GC stationary phase for highly effective molecular screening
Jia Jia, Fujian Xu, Shanling Wang, Xue Jiang, Zhou Long and Xiandeng Hou 
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00332B, Communication

On the optimization of operating conditions for Taylor dispersion analysis of mixtures
Hervé Cottet, Jean-Philippe Biron and Michel Martin  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00192C, PaperHot articles in Analyst

Capillary electrophoresis based on the nucleic acid detection in the application of cancer diagnosis and therapy
Dong-Sheng Lian and Shu-Jin Zhao  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00400K, Minireview

Micropatterning neuronal networks
Heike Hardelauf, Sarah Waide, Julia Sisnaiske, Peter Jacob, Vanessa Hausherr, Nicole Schöbel, Dirk Janasek, Christoph van Thriel and Jonathan West  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00608A, Paper

BRET-linked ATP assay with luciferase
Golnaz Borghei and Elizabeth A. H. Hall  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00436A, Paper

An ultra-high-throughput spiral microfluidic biochip for the enrichment of circulating tumor cells
Majid Ebrahimi Warkiani, Bee Luan Khoo, Daniel Shao-Weng Tan, Ali Asgar S. Bhagat, Wan-Teck Lim, Yoon Sim Yap, Soo Chin Lee, Ross A. Soo, Jongyoon Han and Chwee Teck Lim  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00355A, Paper

A purge and trap integrated microGC platform for chemical identification in aqueous samples
Muhammad Akbar, Shree Narayanan, Michael Restaino and Masoud Agah  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00254G, PaperHot articles in Analyst

Hybridization chain reaction-based fluorescence immunoassay using DNA intercalating dye for signal readout
Yan Deng, Ji Nie, Xiao-hui Zhang, Ming-Zhe Zhao, Ying-Lin Zhou and Xin-Xiang Zhang  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00190G, Paper

Evaluating the sensitivity of hybridization-based epigenotyping using a methyl binding domain protein
Brandon W. Heimer, Tatyana A. Shatova, Jungkyu K. Lee, Kaja Kaastrup and Hadley D. Sikes  
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00667D, Communication

Qualitative SERS analysis of G-quadruplex DNAs using selective stabilising ligands
K. Gracie, V. Dhamodharan, P. I. Pradeepkumar, K. Faulds and D. Graham 
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00551A, Paper

A water-soluble sulfonate-BODIPY based fluorescent probe for selective detection of HOCl/OCl in aqueous media
Jiyoung Kim and Youngmi Kim 
Analyst, 2014,139, 2986-2989
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00466C, Communication

A coumarin-based fluorescent probe for differential identification of sulfide and sulfite in CTAB micelle solution
Haiyu Tian, Junhong Qian, Qian Sun, Chenjia Jiang, Runsheng Zhang and Weibing Zhang 
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00478G, Paper

Upconversion nanoparticles for ratiometric fluorescence detection of nitrite
Junfen Han, Cheng Zhang, Fei Liu, Bianhua Liu, Mingyong Han, Wensheng Zou, Liang Yang and Zhongping Zhang 
Analyst, 2014,139, 3032-3038
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00402G, Paper

Split aptazyme-based catalytic molecular beacons for amplified detection of adenosine
Jin Huang, Yong He, Xiaohai Yang, Kemin Wang, Ke Quan and Xiaoping Lin 
Analyst, 2014,139, 2994-2997
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00454J, CommunicationHot articles in Analyst

High-performance Hg2+ FET-type sensors based on reduced graphene oxide–polyfuran nanohybrids
Jin Wook Park, Seon Joo Park, Oh Seok Kwon, Choonghyen Lee and Jyongsik Jang 
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00403E, Communication

One-step prepared fluorescent copper nanoclusters for reversible pH-sensing
Wei Wang, Fei Leng, Lei Zhan, Yong Chang, Xiao Xi Yang, Jing Lan and Cheng Zhi Huang  
Analyst, 2014,139, 2990-2993
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00113C, Communication

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Developing a Professional Society and Vitamin G

Starting with a dark morning (due to being up at 4:00 am) I got to Manchester airport to meet up with my colleagues Dr Alex Henderson and Profs Roy Goodacre and Peter Gardner. A very quick and easy flight over to Dublin and we were at the mercy of our excellent host Prof. Hugh Byrne at the FOCAS Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology. The reason we were all here was the 2nd quarterly meeting of the Clinical Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Network (www.clirspec.org) funded by an EPSRC Network Grant.

We had a lot to get through including feedback on the progress of the working parties, which will do the main work of the network, but also to report on the progress we have made so far. In a short amount of time we have been able to communicate our developments through our members at Pittcon2014, secure a session at SciX2014 and at Pittcon 2015, advertise ourselves through a Special Issue of the Journal of Biophotonics on “Photonic Biofluid Diagnostics” and importantly (very hot of the press) had a RSC Faraday Discussion accepted for 2016 on “Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy for Biomedical Diagnostics”.

Through this meeting we have managed to establish a Summer School that will take place in 2015 on the shores of Lake Windermere and our first conference that will be held at the University of Exeter hosted by Prof. Nick Stone and Dr Julian Moger in April 2015.  Stay tuned for more information soon.

A running theme of the meeting was the fact that we wanted to engage with the industrial and clinical communities to a greater extent and as such we are glad to be able to sponsor the invited talk of Prof. Hugh Barr at SPEC 2014, Krakow, Poland. The long first day came to close and Prof. Byrne was kind enough to take us for a drink (or two) of Vitamin G.

The next day of the meeting was solely set aside to discuss the development of an international professional society in clinical spectroscopy: the main thrust of our exit strategy. What we didn’t realise when the agenda was set was the potential minefield of logistical problems that we were getting into. However, after many hours discussion, we have a good plan and hope to be able to provide more information soon on how the dynamic world wide community of clinicians, industrialist and academics in our exciting field can get together in order to make a difference to the delivery of healthcare for the benefit of patients

Until the next time…

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What Affects the Coffee Ring of Biofluids?

When a drop is applied to a surface and dries, a number of factors control the formation of the dried drop. Essentially as the fluid or solvent evaporates, capillary flow transports molecules to the contact line of the drop with the surface and the drop dries as a ring with components coarsely separated, like a coffee ring.

Images of sessile drop formation

Drop deposition of biofluids is being investigated worldwide as a possible diagnostic tool. However, the parameters that affect the formation of the biofluids coffee ring are not fully understood and this is a barrier that needs to be overcome in order to realise the clinical potential of drop deposited biofluids. Drop deposition is particularly well suited for examining low abundance biofluids such as tears and synovial fluids but is also widely investigated for blood plasma and serum.

A team of US researchers, based at the University of Michigan, have recently published a HOT article characterising biofluids prepared by drop deposition. The researchers studied two model biofluids, blood plasma and synovial fluid, when deposited onto slightly hydrophilic substrates with a contact angle of 50 – 90 degrees. The researchers showed that under most circumstances the model biofluids followed the piling model, as suggested by Deegan et al. and that an increased understanding of the time-dependent rheology and intermolecular forces that occur during evaporation would provide a better approximation. Importantly, from molecular analysis of the drop via Raman spectroscopy, that whilst the morphology of the dried drop changed the chemical composition and molecular structure of the dried proteins within the outer ring were unaffected.

Karen Esmonde-White, one of the authors, comments “The formation of a ring-like structure and compatibility of the drop deposition technique with multiple analytical technologies are well-known features of drop deposition. In this study, we aimed to formalize what is mostly observational data regarding the underlying fluid dynamics of ring formation in drying biofluids. We hope that this work will improve our understanding of the underlying fluid dynamics and their effect on the dried deposit shape and chemical composition. These fundamental studies allow us to define sources of experimental variability in the drop deposition technique and improve its reproducibility. The eventual aim of these studies is clinical translation for examining rheological and chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with joint diseases”.

Characterization of biofluids prepared by sessile drop formation
Karen A. Esmonde-White, Francis W. L. Esmonde-White, Michael D. Morris and Blake J. Roessler
Analyst, 2014,139, 2734-2741
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02175K
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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks: Graphical abstract: Quantum dots in diagnostics and detection: principles and paradigms

Quantum dots in diagnostics and detection: principles and paradigms
T. R. Pisanic II, Y. Zhang and T. H. Wang
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00294F, Tutorial Review

Cotton fabric-based electrochemical device for lactate measurement in saliva
Radha S. P. Malon, K. Y. Chua, Dedy H. B. Wicaksono and Emma P. Córcoles
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00201F, Paper

Flow cytometric microsphere-based immunoassay as a novel non-radiometric method for the detection of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies in type 1 diabetes mellitus
Luciano L. Guerra, Aldana Trabucchi, Natalia I. Faccinetti, Ruben F. Iacono, Daniela B. Ureta, Edgardo Poskus and Silvina N. Valdez
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02243A, Paper

Enhanced Raman multigas sensing – a novel tool for control and analysis of 13CO2 labeling experiments in environmental research
Robert Keiner, Torsten Frosch, Tara Massad, Susan Trumbore and Jürgen Popp
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01971C, Paper

Simple sample processing enhances malaria rapid diagnostic test performance
K. M. Davis, L. E. Gibson, F. R. Haselton and D. W. Wright
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00338A, Paper

To view these article for free, please register for a free RSC account here

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Call for papers for in vivo analysis themed issue

 

Live-cell vibrational imaging of choline metabolites by stimulated Raman scattering coupled with isotope-based metabolic labelingYou are invited to contribute to the upcoming Analyst themed issue showcasing fundamental discoveries in in vivo analysis.

For your article to be considered for the in vivo analysis themed issue we must receive your manuscript by October 20th 2014.

Guest Edited by Professor Lanqun Mao, Analyst Associate Editor, this upcoming themed issue will highlight recent advances and developments focusing on analytical investigation in vivo. Unconfined by traditional discipline boundaries the issue will feature review articles, original research papers and communications across the breadth of the field.

If you would like to contribute a review article or original research paper to the in vivo analysis themed issue you are most welcome, please contact us.

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New technology may spell the end of having to discard liquids from hand luggage before boarding a plane

An image of the Cobalt Light Systems team

The Cobalt Light Systems team, from left to right: Pavel Matousek, Chief Scientific Officer; Guy Maskall, Data Scientist; Stuart Bonthron, VP Product Development; Craig Tombling, Chief Operating Officer; Paul Loeffen, Chief Executive Officer.(Credit: Cobalt Light Systems)

Analyst Editorial Board Member Professor Pavel Matousek at the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) Central Laser Facility explains, “The technology works using the technique of Raman spectroscopy. When combined with advanced algorithms to distinguish between the container and its contents, the technology is able to identify the chemical composition in seconds, and with greater reliability than any other existing system.”

The equipment developed by the Cobalt Light Systems team characterises the contents inside non-metallic containers, protecting travellers by screening for liquid explosives and has been shortlisted to win the UK’s premier engineering prize, the MacRobert Award.

To read more about this story and the MacRobert Award 2014 head over to the Science & Technology Facilities Council website.

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