Archive for January, 2014

HOT Articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks:

Chemometric determination of lipidic parameters in serum using ATR measurements of dry films of solvent extracts
David Perez-Guaita, Angel Sanchez-Illana, Josep Ventura-Gayete, Salvador Garrigues and Miguel de la Guardia
Analyst, 2014,139, 170-178
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01057K, Paper

Infrared imaging in breast cancer: automated tissue component recognition and spectral characterization of breast cancer cells as well as the tumor microenvironment
Audrey Benard, Christine Desmedt, Margarita Smolina, Philippe Szternfeld, Magali Verdonck, Ghizlane Rouas, Naima Kheddoumi, Françoise Rothé, Denis Larsimont, Christos Sotiriou and Erik Goormaghtigh
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01454A, Paper

SEDFIT–MSTAR: molecular weight and molecular weight distribution analysis of polymers by sedimentation equilibrium in the ultracentrifuge
Peter Schuck, Richard B. Gillis, Tabot M. D. Besong, Fahad Almutairi, Gary G. Adams, Arthur J. Rowe and Stephen E. Harding
Analyst, 2014,139, 79-92
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01507F, Paper

Structured illumination for tomographic X-ray diffraction imaging
Joel A. Greenberg, Mehadi Hassan, Kalyani Krishnamurthy and David Brady
Analyst, 2014,139, 709-713
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01641B, Communication

Molecular interactions of nanomaterials and organisms: defining biomarkers for toxicity and high-throughput screening using traditional and next-generation sequencing approaches
Rebecca Klaper, Devrah Arndt, Jared Bozich and Gustavo Dominguez
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01644G, Critical Review

Conformational and mechanical changes of DNA upon transcription factor binding detected by a QCM and transmission line model
Jorge de-Carvalho, Rogério M. M. Rodrigues, Brigitte Tomé, Sílvia F. Henriques, Nuno P. Mira, Isabel Sá-Correia and Guilherme N. M. Ferreira
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01682J, Paper

Real-time evaluation of aggregation using confocal imaging and image analysis tools
Zahra Hamrang, Egor Zindy, David Clarke and Alain Pluen
Analyst, 2014,139, 564-568
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01693E, Communication

Enhancing the sensitivity of potential step voltammetry using chemometric resolution
Jiarun Tu, Wensheng Cai and Xueguang Shao
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01719B, Paper

Amplified plasmonic detection of DNA hybridization using doxorubicin-capped gold particles
Jolanda Spadavecchia, Ramesh Perumal, Alexandre Barras, Joel Lyskawa, Patrice Woisel, William Laure, Claire-Marie Pradier, Rabah Boukherroub and Sabine Szunerits
Analyst, 2014,139, 157-164
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01794J, Paper

Quantitative dielectrophoretic tracking for characterization and separation of persistent subpopulations of Cryptosporidium parvum
Yi-Hsuan Su, Mikiyas Tsegaye, Walter Varhue, Kuo-Tang Liao, Lydia S. Abebe, James A. Smith, Richard L. Guerrant and Nathan S. Swami
Analyst, 2014,139, 66-73
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01810E, Paper

A dual-plate ITO–ITO generator–collector microtrench sensor: surface activation, spatial separation and suppression of irreversible oxygen and ascorbate interference
Mohammad A. Hasnat, Andrew J. Gross, Sara E. C. Dale, Edward O. Barnes, Richard G. Compton and Frank Marken
Analyst, 2014,139, 569-575
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01826A, Communication

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Analytical Sciences in Brazil themed issue – extended deadline

Analyst and Analytical Methods invite you to submit your next article to a web-themed issue on

Analytical Sciences in Brazil

Interdisciplinary analytical science is particularly welcome

Extended Submission deadline: 31st March 2014
Articles published online in a web collection

Guest Editors: Boris Mizaikoff, University of Ulm
Ivo M. Raimundo Jr., UNICAMP

Analyst: The home of premier fundamental discoveries, inventions and applications in the analytical and bioanalytical sciences with an Impact Factor of 4.0

Analytical Methods: Publishing early applied demonstrations of new analytical methods with clear societal impact and one of the fastest growing general analytical journals.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Conference: Analytical Tools for Cutting-edge Metabolomics

Analytical Tools for Cutting-edge Metabolomics – a joint meeting of the Analytical Division of the RSC and the International Metabolomics Society

Deadline for submission of abstracts is 14 March 2014.

Analytical chemistry has been one of the driving forces behind the development of metabolomics research over the past decade. The conference will bring together exceptional scientists for a program consisting of plenary and invited talks, posters, as well as an oral session devoted to early career researchers. It will be an excellent opportunity for analytical chemists to learn more about metabolomics and its application, and for metabolomics scientists to improve their knowledge of cutting-edge bioanalytical tools.

Date: 30 April 2014 09:30 – 16:45
Location: Burlington House, London
Contact: Mr Brian Woodget
Email: bwoodget1@sky.com
Tel: 01438 880286

Submit online here

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biomarkers leave gender clues at crime scene

Scientists in the US have unveiled details of a colorimetric assay that could provide an initial indication of a suspect’s gender during the on-scene stages of a forensic investigation.

Narrowing the pool of potential suspects early on in their investigations can give the police the upper hand. However, traditional DNA analysis requires laboratory conditions, sophisticated equipment and time. Rapid, simple, on-site analysis of blood left behind at a crime scene may provide investigators with a head start to quickly identify a group of possible suspects or rule out others.

Complementing their previous work, which used the enzyme biomarkers of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) to differentiate between blood samples from different ethnicities, Evgeny Katz at Clarkson University, Potsdam, and Jan Halámek at the University at Albany, State University of New York, have combined analysis of CK with another biomarker, alanine transaminase (ALT), to distinguish between male and female human serum samples. The levels of CK and ALT in the blood of males and females are known to show a small but significant difference. Using a multi-enzyme/multistep biocatalytic cascade, this small difference can be amplified and with the final step involving a coloured compound, a visual identification of gender can be made.

To read the full article, please go to Chemistry World.

Biocatalytic analysis of biomarkers for forensic identification of gender
Saira Bakshi, Lenka Halámková, Jan Halámek and Evgeny Katz
Analyst, 2014,139, 559-563
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02055J, Communication

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Stress-free sperm sexing

Mass differences between bovine sperm bearing X or Y chromosomes have been measured by researchers in Italy. The findings could be used to develop a gentle sperm sexing technique.

The livestock industry relies on sperm sorting to select the right candidates for artificial insemination. Flow cytometry, the current technique used to sort sperm, involves labelling sperm with a fluorescent dye and capturing the labelled sperm in single droplets before exciting the dye. The strength of the dye’s fluorescence indicates the presence of X or Y chromosomes. However, in this intrusive process the sperm become stressed – the extent of the damage this causes is still under debate.

A microbridge sensor developed by Marco Mauro and his team at Novaetech, Napoli, in collaboration with the Italian Experimental Institute, Lazarro Spallanzani in Cremona, is a non-invasive alternative for sorting live sperm cells.

To read the full article, please visit Chemistry World.

Experimental evidence of a buoyant mass difference between bovine spermatozoa bearing X- and Y-chromosomes using a micromechanical resonator
Marco Mauro, Raffaele Battaglia, Gianluca Ferrini, Roberto Puglisi, Donatella Balduzzi and Andrea Galli
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01979A, Paper

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Mid-air monitoring of migrating birds

Scientists in the US have designed a biosensor that could be used to study the metabolism of free-flying birds in real time.

There is still much we could learn about wild bird species to help us understand their behaviour, biology and evolution. The fast metabolism of birds makes them very responsive to environmental changes so bird studies are also very useful in ecology research.

Researchers have tracked migration patterns using radio tags and data loggers, but physiological states are mainly assessed by capturing the birds and taking blood samples. Such samples will only provide information of a bird’s current state, which will vary widely depending on the time of year, breeding, migration and so on. A device that tracks a bird whilst monitoring its physiological state would provide in depth information, particularly on migrating birds that travel thousands of kilometres.

Abdurrahman Gumus and colleagues at Cornell University have designed a sensor that could be used to track a bird whilst monitoring its physiology. Gumus says ‘although we have the ability to track the position of birds and, to some degree, correlate their behaviour with environmental conditions, the ability to actually directly link this with the physiological state opens up an entirely new way of conducting ornithological research’.

To read the full article, please visit Chemistry World.

Real-time in vivo uric acid biosensor system for biophysical monitoring of birds
A. Gumus, S. Lee, K. Karlsson, R. Gabrielson, D. W. Winkler and D. Erickson
Analyst, 2014,139, 742-748
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01787G, Paper

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Biocomputer decides when to administer drugs

Scientists in the US have devised an enzymatic logic system that could be used for releasing drugs. This is the first report of a man-made biomolecular system that can process a series of physiological signals, without the use of electronics.

Biocomputer-based logic systems that process biomolecular signals could revolutionise drug administration. By harnessing signal-responsive electrode surfaces that respond to biochemical signals, widespread personalised medicine takes a step closer to reality.

Historically, drug-release systems have been plagued by slow and uncontrolled release. Various external triggers, including temperature, pH and biochemical species, have been used to stimulate drug release. Systems activated by biochemical signals are often complicated and limited, combining both the receptor and the release system. Physical separation of these two components on individual electrodes would simplify the process.

Expanding on their recent work with glucose sensing electrodes, Evgeny Katz and Shay Mailloux at Clarkson University, in collaboration with Jan Halámek from the State University of New York at Albany, have developed a logical biomolecule release system. An electrode covered by a redox-active, iron(III)-cross-linked alginate polymer film with physically entrapped biomolecules serves as the substance-releasing component and a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-modified electrode serves as the biocatalytic electrode.

To read the full article, please visit Chemistry World

A model system for targeted drug release triggered by biomolecular signals logically processed through enzyme logic networks
Shay Mailloux, Jan Halámek and Evgeny Katz
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02162A, Communication

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)